• Obscuration of the continuum emission from active galactic nuclei by streams of gas with relatively high velocity (> 1000 km/s) and column density (>3E25 per m2) has been seen in a few Seyfert galaxies. This obscuration has a transient nature. In December 2016 we have witnessed such an event in NGC 3783. The frequency and duration of these obscuration events is poorly known. Here we study archival data of NGC 3783 in order to constrain this duty cycle. We use archival Chandra/NuSTAR spectra taken in August 2016. We also study the hardness ratio of all Swift XRT spectra taken between 2008-2017. In August 2016, NGC 3783 also showed evidence for obscuration. While the column density of the obscuring material is ten times lower than in December 2016, the opacity is still sufficient to block a significant fraction of the ionising X-ray and EUV photons. From the Swift hardness ratio behaviour we find several other epochs with obscuration. Obscuration with columns >1E26 per m2 may take place in about half of the time. Also in archival X-ray data taken by ASCA in 1993 and 1996 we find evidence for obscuration. Obscuration of the ionising photons in NGC 3783 occurs more frequently than previously thought. This may not always have been recognised due to low spectral resolution observations, too limited spectral bandwidth or confusion with underlying continuum variations.
  • We investigate the physical structure of the AGN wind in the Seyfert-1 galaxy NGC 7469 through high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with Chandra HETGS and photoionisation modelling. Contemporaneous data from Chandra, HST, and Swift are used to model the optical-UV-X-ray continuum and determine the spectral energy distribution (SED) at two epochs, 13 years apart. For our investigation we use new observations taken in December 2015-January 2016, and historical ones taken in December 2002. We study the impact of a change in the SED shape, seen between the two epochs, on the photoionisation of the wind. The HETGS spectroscopy shows that the AGN wind in NGC 7469 consists of four ionisation components, with their outflow velocities ranging from -400 to -1800 km/s. From our modelling we find that the change in the ionising continuum shape between the two epochs results in some variation in the ionisation state of the wind components. However, for the main ions detected in X-rays, the sum of their column densities over all four components, remains in practice unchanged. For two of the four components, which are found to be thermally unstable in both epochs, we obtain 2 < r < 31 pc and 12 < r < 29 pc using the cooling and recombination timescales. For the other two thermally stable components, we obtain r < 31 pc and r < 80 pc from the recombination timescale. The results of our photoionisation modelling and thermal stability analysis suggest that the absorber components in NGC 7469 are consistent with being a thermally-driven wind from the AGN torus. Finally, from analysis of the zeroth-order ACIS/HETG data, we discover that the X-ray emission between 0.2-1 keV is spatially extended over 1.5-12". This diffuse soft X-ray emission is explained by coronal emission from the nuclear starburst ring in NGC 7469.
  • We conducted a multi-wavelength six-month campaign to observe the Seyfert galaxy NGC~7469, using the space-based observatories \textit{HST}, \textit{Swift}, \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR}. Here we report the results of the spectral analysis of the 7 simultaneous \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR} observations. The sources shows significant flux variability within each observation, but the average flux is less variable among the different pointings of our campaign. Our spectral analysis reveals a prominent narrow neutral \ion{Fe} K$\alpha$ emission line in all the spectra, with weaker contributions from Fe K$\beta$, neutral Ni K$\alpha$ and ionised iron. We find no evidence for variability or relativistic effects acting on the emission lines, which indicates that they originate from distant material. Analysing jointly \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR} data a constant photon index is found ($\Gamma$=$1.78\pm0.02$), together with a high energy cut-off $E_{\rm{cut}}=170^{+60}_{-40}$ keV. Adopting a self-consistent Comptonization model, these values correspond to an average coronal electron temperature of kT=$45^{+15}_{-12}$ keV and, assuming a spherical geometry, an optical depth $\tau=2.6\pm0.9$. The reflection component is consistent with being constant, with a reflection fraction in the range $R=0.3-0.6$. A prominent soft excess dominates the spectra below 4 keV. This is best fit with a second Comptonization component, arising from a \virg{warm corona} with an average $kT=0.67\pm0.03$ keV and a corresponding optical depth $\tau=9.2\pm0.2$.
  • The X-ray narrow emission line region (NELR) of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC\,5548 has been interpreted as a single-phase photoionized plasma that is absorbed by some of the warm absorber components. This scenario requires those overlaying warm absorber components to have larger distance (to the central engine) than the X-ray NELR, which is not fully consistent with the distance estimates found in the literature. Therefore, we reanalyze the high-resolution spectra obtained in 2013--2014 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) aboard \textit{XMM}-Newton to provide an alternative interpretation of the X-ray narrow emission features. We find that the X-ray narrow emission features in NGC\,5548 can be described by a two-phase photoionized plasma with different ionization parameters ($\log \xi=1.3$ and $0.1$) and kinematics ($v_{\rm out}=-50$ and $-400~{\rm km~s^{-1}}$), and no further absorption by the warm absorber components. The X-ray and optical NELR might be the same multi-phase photoionized plasma. Both X-ray and optical NELR have comparable distances, asymmetric line profiles, and the underlying photoionized plasma is turbulent and compact in size. The X-ray NELR is not the counterpart of the UV/X-ray absorber outside the line of sight because their distances and kinematics are not consistent. In addition, X-ray broad emission features that we find in the spectrum can be accounted for by a third photoionized emission component. The RGS spectrum obtained in 2016 is analyzed as well, where the luminosity of most prominent emission lines (the \ion{O}{vii} forbidden line and \ion{O}{viii} Ly$\alpha$ line) are the same (at a 1 $\sigma$ confidence level) as in 2013--2014.
  • The Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 hosts a $\sim$kpc extended outflow that is evident in the [\ion{O}{iii}] image and that is also detected as a warm absorber in the UV/X-ray spectrum. Here, we analyze a $\sim$30 ks Chandra-ACIS X-ray image, with the aim of resolving the diffuse extranuclear X-ray emission and of investigating its relationship with the galactic outflow. Thanks to its sub-arcsecond spatial resolution, Chandra resolves the circumnuclear X-ray emission, which extends up to a projected distance of at least $\sim$16 kpc from the center. The morphology of the diffuse X-ray emission is spherically symmetrical. We could not recover a morphological resemblance between the soft X-ray emission and the ionization bicone that is traced by the [\ion{O}{iii}] outflow. we argue that the photoionized gas nebula must be distributed mostly along the polar directions, outside our line of sight. In this geometry, the X-ray/UV warm absorber must trace a different gas component, physically disconnected from the emitting gas, and located closer to the equatorial plane.
  • We investigate the ionic column density variability of the ionized outflows associated with NGC$\sim$7469, to estimate their location and power. This could allow a better understanding of galactic feedback of AGNs to their host galaxies. Analysis of seven XMM-Newton grating observations from 2015 is reported. We use an individual-ion spectral fitting approach, and compare different epochs to accurately determine variability on time-scales of years, months, and days. We find no significant column density variability in a 10 year period implying that the outflow is far from the ionizing source. The implied lower bound on the ionization equilibrium time, 10 years, constrains the lower limit on the distance to be at least 12 pc, and up to 31 pc, much less but consistent with the 1 kpc wide starburst ring. The ionization distribution of column density is reconstructed from measured column densities, nicely matching results of two 2004 observations, with one large high ionization parameter ($\xi$) component at $2<\log \xi<3.5$, and one at $0.5<\log \xi<1$ in cgs units. The strong dependence of the expression for kinetic power, $\propto1/\xi$, hampers tight constraints on the feedback mechanism of outflows with a large range in ionization parameter, which is often observed and indicates a non-conical outflow. The kinetic power of the outflow is estimated here to be within 0.4 and 60 \% of the Eddington luminosity, depending on the ion used to estimate $\xi$.
  • We report on the X-ray dust-scattering features observed around the afterglow of the gamma ray burst GRB 160623A. With an XMM-Newton observation carried out ~2 days after the burst, we found evidence of at least six rings, with angular size expanding between ~2 and 9 arcmin, as expected for X-ray scattering of the prompt GRB emission by dust clouds in our Galaxy. From the expansion rate of the rings, we measured the distances of the dust layers with extraordinary precision: 528.1 +\- 1.2 pc, 679.2 +\- 1.9 pc, 789.0 +\- 2.8 pc, 952 +\- 5 pc, 1539 +\- 20 pc and 5079 +\- 64 pc. A spectral analysis of the ring spectra, based on an appropriate dust-scattering model (BARE-GR-B from Zubko et al. 2004}) and the estimated burst fluence, allowed us to derive the column density of the individual dust layers, which are in the range 7x10^20-1.5x10^22 cm^-2. The farthest dust-layer (i.e. the one responsible for the smallest ring) is also the one with the lowest column density and it is possibly very extended, indicating a diffuse dust region. The properties derived for the six dust-layers (distance, thickness, and optical depth) are generally in good agreement with independent information on the reddening along this line of sight and on the distribution of molecular and atomic gas.
  • X-ray spectral timing analysis is presented of XMM-Newton observations of the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy I Zwicky 1 (I Zw 1) taken in 2015 January. After exploring the effect of background flaring on timing analyses, X-ray time lags between the reflection-dominated 0.3-1.0keV energy and continuum-dominated 1.0-4.0keV band are measured, indicative of reverberation off the inner accretion disc. The reverberation lag time is seen to vary as a step function in frequency; across lower frequency components of the variability, 3e-4 to 1.2e-3Hz a lag of 160s is measured, but the lag shortens to (59 +/- 4)s above 1.2e-3Hz. The lag-energy spectrum reveals differing profiles between these ranges with a change in the dip showing the earliest arriving photons. The low frequency signal indicates reverberation of X-rays emitted from a corona extended at low height over the disc while at high frequencies, variability is generated in a collimated core of the corona through which luminosity fluctuations propagate upwards. Principal component analysis of the variability supports this interpretation, showing uncorrelated variation in the spectral slope of two power law continuum components. The distinct evolution of the two components of the corona is seen as a flare passes inwards from the extended to the collimated portion. An increase in variability in the extended corona was found preceding the initial increase in X-ray flux. Variability from the extended corona was seen to die away as the flare passed into the collimated core leading to a second sharper increase in the X-ray count rate.
  • In 2016 we carried out a Swift monitoring program to track the X-ray hardness variability of eight type-I AGN over a year. The purpose of this monitoring was to find intense obscuration events in AGN, and thereby study them by triggering joint XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and HST observations. We successfully accomplished this for NGC 3783 in December 2016. We found heavy X-ray absorption produced by an obscuring outflow in this AGN. As a result of this obscuration, interesting absorption features appear in the UV and X-ray spectra, which are not present in the previous epochs. Namely, the obscuration produces broad and blue-shifted UV absorption lines of Ly$\alpha$, C IV, and N V, together with a new high-ionisation component producing Fe XXV and Fe XXVI absorption lines. In soft X-rays, only narrow emission lines stand out above the diminished continuum as they are not absorbed by the obscurer. Our analysis shows that the obscurer partially covers the central source with a column density of few $10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, outflowing with a velocity of few thousand km s$^{-1}$. The obscuration in NGC 3783 is variable and lasts for about a month. Unlike the commonly-seen warm-absorber winds at pc-scale distances from the black hole, the eclipsing wind in NGC 3783 is located at about 10 light days. Our results suggest the obscuration is produced by an inhomogeneous and clumpy medium, consistent with clouds in the base of a radiatively-driven disk wind at the outer broad-line region of the AGN.
  • NGC 2617 is a nearby ($z\sim 0.01$) active galaxy that recently switched from being a Seyfert 1.8 to be a Seyfert 1.0. At the same time, it underwent a strong increase of X-ray flux by one order of magnitude with respect to archival measurements. We characterise the X-ray spectral and timing properties of NGC 2617 with the aim of studying the physics of a changing-look active galactic nucleus (AGN). We performed a comprehensive timing and spectral analysis of two XMM-Newton pointed observations spaced by one month, complemented by archival quasi-simultaneous INTEGRAL observations. We found that, to the first order, NGC 2617 looks like a type 1 AGN in the X-ray band and, with the addition of a modest reflection component, its continuum can be modelled well either with a power law plus a phenomenological blackbody, a partially covered power law, or a double Comptonisation model. Independent of the continuum adopted, in all three cases a column density of a few $10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ of neutral gas covering 20-40\% of the continuum source is required by the data. Most interestingly, absorption structures due to highly ionised iron have been detected in both observations with a redshift of about $0.1c$ with respect to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy. The redshifted absorber can be ascribed to a failed wind/aborted jets component, to gravitational redshift effects, and/or to matter directly falling towards the central supermassive black hole. In either case, we are probing the innermost accretion flow around the central supermassive black hole of NGC 2617 and might be even watching matter in a direct inflow towards the black hole itself.
  • Outflows of photoionized gas are commonly detected in the X-ray spectra of Seyfert 1 galaxies. However, the evidence for this phenomenon in broad line radio galaxies, which are analogous to Seyfert 1 galaxies in the radio-loud regime, has so far been scarce. Here, we present the analysis of the X-ray absorption in the radio-loud quasar 4C +74.26. With the aim of characterizing the kinetic and the ionization conditions of the absorbing material, we fitted jointly the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) spectra, which were taken 4 months apart. The intrinsic continuum flux did not vary significantly during this time lapse. The spectrum shows the absorption signatures (e.g., Fe-UTA, \ion{O}{vii}, and \ion{Ne}{vii}--\ion{Ne}{x}) of a photoionized gas outflow ($N_{\rm H} \sim 3.5 \times 10^{21} \rm cm^{-2}$, $\log \xi \sim 2.6$, $v_{\rm out}\sim 3600 \, \rm km \, s^{-1}$) located at the redshift of source. We estimate that the gas is located outside the broad line region but within the boundaries of the putative torus. This ionized absorber is consistent with the X-ray counterpart of a polar scattering outflow reported in the optical band for this source. The kinetic luminosity carried by the outflow is insufficient to produce a significant feedback is this quasar. Finally, we show that the heavy soft X-ray absorption that was noticed in the past for this source arises mostly in the Galactic ISM.
  • We model the broad emission lines present in the optical, UV and X-ray spectra of Mrk 509, a bright type 1 Seyfert galaxy. The broad lines were simultaneously observed during a large multiwavelength campaign, using the XMM-Newton-OM for the optical lines, HST-COS for the UV lines and XMM-Newton-RGS and Epic for the X-ray lines respectively. We also used FUSE archival data for the broad lines observed in the far-ultra-violet. The goal is to find a physical connection among the lines measured at different wavelengths and determine the size and the distance from the central source of the emitting gas components. We used the "Locally optimally emission Cloud" (LOC) model which interprets the emissivity of the broad line region (BLR) as regulated by powerlaw distributions of both gas density and distances from the central source. We find that one LOC component cannot model all the lines simultaneously. In particular, we find that the X-ray and UV lines likely may originate in the more internal part of the AGN, at radii in the range ~5x10^{14}-3x10^{17} cm, while the optical lines and part of the UV lines may likely be originating further out, at radii ~3x10^{17}-3x^{18} cm. These two gas components are parametrized by a radial distribution of the luminosities with a slope gamma of ~1.15 and ~1.10, respectively, both of them covering at least 60% of the source. This simple parameterization points to a structured broad line region, with the higher ionized emission coming from closer in, while the emission of the low-ionization lines is more concentrated in the outskirts of the broad line region.
  • In 2013 we conducted a large multi-wavelength campaign on the archetypical Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. Unexpectedly, this usually unobscured source appeared strongly absorbed in the soft X-rays during the entire campaign, and signatures of new and strong outflows were present in the almost simultaneous UV HST/COS data. Here we carry out a comprehensive spectral analysis of all available XMM-Newton observations of NGC 5548 (for a total of ~763 ks) in combination with 3 simultaneous NuSTAR obs. We obtain a best-fit composed by i) a weakly varying flat (Gamma~1.5-1.7) power-law component; ii) a constant, cold reflection (FeK + continuum) component; iii) a soft excess, possibly due to thermal Comptonization; and iv) a constant, ionized scattered emission-line dominated component. Our main findings are that, during the 2013 campaign, the first 3 of these components appear to be partially covered by a heavy and variable obscurer located along the l.o.s. that is consistent with a multilayer of cold and mildly ionized gas. We characterize in detail the short timescale (~ks-to-days) spectral variability of this new obscurer, and find it is mostly due to a combination of Nh and Cf variations, on top of intrinsic power-law variations. In addition, our best-fit spectrum is left with several (but marginal) absorption features at rest-frame energies ~6.7-6.9 keV and ~8 keV, as well as a weak broad emission line feature redwards of the 6.4 keV emission line. These could indicate a more complex underlying model, e.g. a P-Cygni-type profile if allowing for a large velocity and wide-angle outflow. These findings are consistent with a picture where the obscurer represents the manifestation along the l.o.s. of a multilayer of gas that is likely outflowing at high speed, and simultaneously producing heavy obscuration and scattering in the X-rays and broad absorption features in the UV.
  • We present our investigation into the long-term variability of the X-ray obscuration and optical-UV-X-ray continuum in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. In 2013 and 2014, the Swift observatory monitored NGC 5548 on average every day or two, with archival observations reaching back to 2005, totalling about 670 ks of observing time. Both broadband spectral modelling and temporal rms variability analysis are applied to the Swift data. We disentangle the variability caused by absorption, due to an obscuring weakly-ionised outflow near the disk, from variability of the intrinsic continuum components (the soft X-ray excess and the power-law) originating from the disk and its associated coronae. The spectral model that we apply to this extensive Swift data is the global model that we derived for NGC 5548 from analysis of the stacked spectra from our multi-satellite campaign of summer 2013 (including XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and HST). The results of our Swift study show that changes in the covering fraction of the obscurer is the primary and dominant cause of variability in the soft X-ray band on timescales of 10 days to ~ 5 months. The obscuring covering fraction of the X-ray source is found to range between 0.7 and nearly 1.0. The contribution of the soft excess component to the X-ray variability is often much less than that of the obscurer, but it becomes comparable when the optical-UV continuum flares up. We find that the soft excess is consistent with being the high-energy tail of the optical-UV continuum and can be explained by warm Comptonisation: up-scattering of the disk seed photons in a warm, optically thick corona as part of the inner disk. To this date, the Swift monitoring of NGC 5548 shows that the obscurer has been continuously present in our line of sight for at least 4 years (since at least February 2012).
  • (Abridged) The archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 was observed in 2013-2014 in the context of an extensive multiwavelength campaign, which revealed the source to be in an extraordinary state of persistent heavy obscuration. We re-analyzed the archival grating spectra obtained by XMM-Newton and Chandra between 1999 and 2007 in order to characterize the classic warm absorber (WA) using consistent models and up-to-date photoionization codes and atomic physics databases and to construct a baseline model that can be used as a template for the WA in the 2013 observations. The WA in NGC 5548 is composed of 6 distinct ionization phases outflowing in 4 kinematic regimes in the form of a stratified wind with several layers intersected by our line of sight. If the changes in the WA are solely due to ionization or recombination processes in response to variations in the ionizing flux among the different observations, we are able to estimate lower limits on the density of the WA, finding that the farthest components are less dense and have a lower ionization. These limits are used to put stringent upper limits on the distance of the WA components from the central ionizing source, with the lowest ionization phases <50, <20, and <5 pc, respectively, while the intermediately ionized components lie at <3.6 and <2.2 pc from the center, respectively. The highest ionization component is located at ~0.6 pc or closer to the AGN central engine. The mass outflow rate summed over all WA components is ~0.3 Msun/yr, about six times the nominal accretion rate of the source. The total kinetic luminosity injected into the ISM is a small fraction (~0.03%) of the bolometric luminosity of the source. After adding the contribution of the UV absorbers, this value augments to ~0.2% of the bolometric luminosity, well below the minimum amount of energy required by current feedback models to regulate galaxy evolution.
  • Context. Our consortium performed an extensive multi-wavelength campaign of the nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 in 2013-14. The source appeared unusually heavily absorbed in the soft X-rays, and signatures of outflowing absorption were also present in the UV. He-like triplets of neon, oxygen and nitrogen, and radiative recombination continuum (RRC) features were found to dominate the soft X-ray spectrum due to the low continuum flux. Aims. Here we focus on characterising these narrow emission features using data obtained from the XMM-Newton RGS (770 ks stacked spectrum). Methods. We use SPEX for our initial analysis of these features. Self-consistent photoionisation models from Cloudy are then compared with the data to characterise the physical conditions of the emitting region. Results. Outflow velocity discrepancies within the O VII triplet lines can be explained if the X-ray narrow-line region (NLR) in NGC 5548 is absorbed by at least one of the six warm absorber components found by previous analyses. The RRCs allow us to directly calculate a temperature of the emitting gas of a few eV ($\sim10^{4}$ K), favouring photoionised conditions. We fit the data with a Cloudy model of log $\xi = 1.45 \pm 0.05$ erg cm s$^{-1}$, log $N_H = 22.9 \pm 0.4$ cm$^{-2}$ and log v$_{turb} = 2.25 \pm 0.5$ km s$^{-1}$ for the emitting gas; this is the first time the X-ray NLR gas in this source has been modelled so comprehensively. This allows us to estimate the distance from the central source to the illuminated face of the emitting clouds as $13.9 \pm 0.6$ pc, consistent with previous work.
  • During an extensive multiwavelength campaign that we performed in 2013-14 the prototypical Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 has been found in an unusual condition of heavy and persistent obscuration. The newly discovered "obscurer" absorbs most of the soft X-ray continuum along our line of sight and lowers the ionizing luminosity received by the classical warm absorber. Here we present the analysis of the high resolution X-ray spectra collected with XMM-Newton and Chandra throughout the campaign, which are suitable to investigate the variability of both the obscurer and the classical warm absorber. The time separation between these X-ray observations range from 2 days to 8 months. On these timescales the obscurer is variable both in column density and in covering fraction. This is consistent with the picture of a patchy wind. The most significant variation occurred in September 2013 when the source brightened for two weeks. A higher and steeper intrinsic continuum and a lower obscurer covering fraction are both required to explain the spectral shape during the flare. We suggest that a geometrical change of the soft X-ray source behind the obscurer cause the observed drop in the covering fraction. Due to the higher soft X-ray continuum level the September 2013 Chandra spectrum is the only X ray spectrum of the campaign where individual features of the warm absorber could be detected. The spectrum shows absorption from Fe-UTA, \ion{O}{iv}, and \ion{O}{v}, consistent to belong to the lower-ionization counterpart of the historical NGC 5548 warm absorber. Hence, we confirm that the warm absorber has responded to the drop in the ionizing luminosity caused by the obscurer.
  • We describe the analysis of the seven broad-band X-ray continuum observations of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 that were obtained with XMM-Newton or Chandra, simultaneously with high-energy (> 10 keV) observations with NuSTAR and INTEGRAL. These data were obtained as part of a multiwavelength campaign undertaken from the summer of 2013 till early 2014. We find evidence of a high-energy cut-off in at least one observation, which we attribute to thermal Comptonization, and a constant reflected component that is likely due to neutral material at least a few light months away from the continuum source. We confirm the presence of strong, partial covering X-ray absorption as the explanation for the sharp decrease in flux through the soft X-ray band. The obscurers appear to be variable in column density and covering fraction on time scales as short as weeks. A fit of the average spectrum over the range 0.3-400 keV with a realistic Comptonization model indicates the presence of a hot corona with a temperature of 40(+40,-10) keV and an optical depth of 2.7(+0.7,-1.2) if a spherical geometry is assumed.
  • An extensive multi-satellite campaign on NGC 5548 has revealed this archetypal Seyfert-1 galaxy to be in an exceptional state of persistent heavy absorption. Our observations taken in 2013-2014 with XMM-Newton, Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and two ground-based observatories have together enabled us to establish that this unexpected phenomenon is caused by an outflowing stream of weakly ionised gas (called the obscurer), extending from the vicinity of the accretion disk to the broad-line region. In this work we present the details of our campaign and the data obtained by all the observatories. We determine the spectral energy distribution of NGC 5548 from near-infrared to hard X-rays by establishing the contribution of various emission and absorption processes taking place along our line of sight towards the central engine. We thus uncover the intrinsic emission and produce a broadband continuum model for both obscured (average summer 2013 data) and unobscured ($<$ 2011) epochs of NGC 5548. Our results suggest that the intrinsic NIR/optical/UV continuum is a single Comptonised component with its higher energy tail creating the 'soft X-ray excess'. This component is compatible with emission from a warm, optically-thick corona as part of the inner accretion disk. We then investigate the effects of the continuum on the ionisation balance and thermal stability of photoionised gas for unobscured and obscured epochs.
  • (Abridged) Our deep multiwavelength campaign on NGC 5548 revealed an unusually strong X-ray obscuration. The resulting dramatic decrease in incident ionizing flux allowed us to construct a comprehensive physical, spatial and temporal picture for the long-studied AGN wind in this object. Here we analyze the UV spectra of the outflow acquired during the campaign as well as from four previous epochs. We find that a simple model based on a fixed total column-density absorber, reacting to changes in ionizing illumination, matches the very different ionization states seen in five spectroscopic epochs spanning 16 years. Absorption troughs from C III* appeared for the first time during our campaign. From these troughs, we infer that the main outflow component is situated at 3.5+-1 pc from the central source. Three other components are situated between 5-70 pc and two are further than 100 pc. The wealth of observational constraints and the disparate relationship of the observed X-ray and UV flux between different epochs make our physical model a leading contender for interpreting trough variability data of quasar outflows.
  • We present in this paper the results of a 270 ks Chandra HETGS observation in the context of a large multiwavelength campaign on the Seyfert galaxy Mrk 509. The HETGS spectrum allows us to study the high ionisation warm absorber and the Fe-K complex in Mrk 509. We search for variability in the spectral properties of the source with respect to previous observations in this campaign, as well as for evidence of ultra-fast outflow signatures. The Chandra HETGS X-ray spectrum of Mrk 509 was analysed using the SPEX fitting package. We confirm the basic structure of the warm absorber found in the 600 ks XMM-Newton RGS observation observed three years earlier, consisting of five distinct ionisation components in a multikinematic regime. We find little or no variability in the physical properties of the different warm absorber phases with respect to previous observations in this campaign, except for component D2 which has a higher column density at the expense of component C2 at the same outflow velocity (-240 km/s). Contrary to prior reports we find no -700 km/s outflow component. The O VIII absorption line profiles show an average covering factor of 0.81 +/- 0.08 for outflow velocities faster than -100 km/s, similar to those measured in the UV. This supports the idea of a patchy wind. The relative metal abundances in the outflow are close to proto-solar. The narrow component of the Fe Kalpha emission line shows no changes with respect to previous observations which confirms its origin in distant matter. The narrow line has a red wing that can be interpreted to be a weak relativistic emission line. We find no significant evidence of ultra-fast outflows in our new spectrum down to the sensitivity limit of our data.
  • Supermassive black holes in the nuclei of active galaxies expel large amounts of matter through powerful winds of ionized gas. The archetypal active galaxy NGC 5548 has been studied for decades, and high-resolution X-ray and UV observations have previously shown a persistent ionized outflow. An observing campaign in 2013 with six space observatories shows the nucleus to be obscured by a long-lasting, clumpy stream of ionized gas never seen before. It blocks 90% of the soft X-ray emission and causes simultaneous deep, broad UV absorption troughs. The outflow velocities of this gas are up to five times faster than those in the persistent outflow, and at a distance of only a few light days from the nucleus, it may likely originate from the accretion disk.
  • Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are the most luminous persistent objects in the universe. An excess of X-ray emission below about 2 keV, called soft-excess, is very common in Type 1 AGN spectra. The origin of this feature remains debated. Originally modeled with a blackbody, there are now several possibilities to model the soft-excess, including warm Comptonization and blurred ionized reflection. In this paper, we test ionized-reflection models on Mrk 509, a bright Seyfert 1 galaxy for which we have a unique data set, in order to determine whether it can be responsible for the strong soft-excess. We use ten simultaneous XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL observations performed every four days. We present here the results of the spectral analysis, the evolution of the parameters and the variability properties of the X-ray emission. The application of blurred ionized-reflection models leads to a very strong reflection and an extreme geometry, but fails to reproduce the broad-band spectrum of Mrk 509. Two different scenarios for blurred ionized reflection are discussed: stable geometry and lamp-post configuration. In both cases we find that the model parameters do not follow the expected relations, indicating that the model is fine-tuned to fit the data without physical justification. A large, slow variation of the soft-excess without counterpart in the hard X-rays could be explained by a change in ionization of the reflector. However, such a change does not naturally follow from the assumed geometrical configuration. Warm Comptonization remains the most probable origin of the soft-excess in this object. Nevertheless, it is possible that both ionized reflection and warm Comptonization mechanisms can explain the soft-excess in all objects, one dominating the other one, depending on the physical conditions of the disk and the corona.
  • The Advanced Telescope for High-energy Astrophysics (Athena+) is being proposed to ESA as the L2 mission (for a launch in 2028) and is specifically designed to answer two of the most pressing questions for astrophysics in the forthcoming decade: How did ordinary matter assemble into the large scale structures we see today? and how do black holes grow and shape the Universe? For addressing these two issues, Athena+ will provide transformational capabilities in terms of angular resolution, effective area, spectral resolution, grasp, that will make it the most powerful X-ray observatory ever flown. Such an observatory, when opened to the astronomical community, will be used for virtually all classes of astrophysical objects, from high-z gamma-ray bursts to the closest planets in our solar neighborhood. In this paper, we briefly review the core science objectives of Athena+, present the science requirements and the foreseen implementation of the mission, and illustrate its transformational capabilities compared to existing facilities.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of new XMM-Newton data of the source CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, detected in the COSMOS survey at z = 0.359. Previous works suggested that CID-42 is a candidate recoiling supermassive black holes showing also an inverted P-Cygni profile in the X- ray spectra at ~6 keV (rest) with an iron emission line plus a redshifted absorption line (detected at 3sigma in previous XMM-Newton and Chandra observations). Detailed analysis of the absorption line suggested the presence of ionized material inflowing into the black hole at high velocity. In the new long XMM-Newton observation, while the overall spectral shape remains constant, the continuum 2-10 keV flux decreased of ~20% with respect to previous observation and the absorption line is undetected. The upper limit on the intensity of the absorption line is EW<162 keV. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations show that the non detection of the line is solely due to variation in the properties of the inflowing material, in agreement with the transient nature of these features, and that the intensity of the line is lower than the previously measured with a probability of 98.8%. In the scenario of CID-42 as recoiling SMBH, the absorption line can be interpreted as due to inflow of gas with variable density and located in the proximity of the SMBH and recoiling with it. New monitoring observations will be requested to further characterize this line.