• We present an X-ray follow-up, based on XMM plus Chandra, of six Fossil Group (FG) candidates identified in our previous work using SDSS and RASS data. Four candidates (out of six) exhibit extended X-ray emission, confirming them as true FGs. For the other two groups, the RASS emission has its origin as either an optically dull/X-ray bright AGN, or the blending of distinct X-ray sources. Using SDSS-DR7 data, we confirm, for all groups, the presence of an r-band magnitude gap between the seed elliptical and the second-rank galaxy. However, the gap value depends, up to 0.5mag, on how one estimates the seed galaxy total flux, which is greatly underestimated when using SDSS (relative to Sersic) magnitudes. This implies that many FGs may be actually missed when using SDSS data, a fact that should be carefully taken into account when comparing the observed number densities of FGs to the expectations from cosmological simulations. The similarity in the properties of seed--FG and non-fossil ellipticals, found in our previous study, extends to the sample of X-ray confirmed FGs, indicating that bright ellipticals in FGs do not represent a distinct population of galaxies. For one system, we also find that the velocity distribution of faint galaxies is bimodal, possibly showing that the system formed through the merging of two groups. This undermines the idea that all selected FGs form a population of true fossils.
  • We present the analysis of the luminosity function of a large sample of galaxy clusters from the Northern Sky Optical Cluster Survey, using latest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our global luminosity function (down to M_r<= -16) does not show the presence of an upturn at faint magnitudes, while we do observe a strong dependence of its shape on both richness and cluster-centric radius, with a brightening of M^* and an increase of the dwarf to giant ratio with richness, indicating that more massive systems are more efficient in creating/retaining a population of dwarf satellites. This is observed both within physical (0.5 R_200) and fixed (0.5 Mpc) apertures, suggesting that the trend is either due to a global effect, operating at all scales, or to a local one but operating on even smaller scales. We further observe a decrease of the relative number of dwarf galaxies towards the cluster center; this is most probably due to tidal collisions or collisional disruption of the dwarfs since merging processes are inhibited by the high velocity dispersions in cluster cores and, furthermore, we do not observe a strong dependence of the bright end on the environment. We find indication that the dwarf to giant ratio decreases with increasing redshift, within 0.07<z<0.2. We also measure a trend for stronger suppression of faint galaxies (below M^*+2) with increasing redshift in poor systems, with respect to more massive ones, indicating that the evolutionary stage of less massive galaxies depends more critically on the environment. Finally we point out that the luminosity function is far from universal; hence the uncertainties introduced by the different methods used to build a composite function may partially explain the variety of faint-end slopes reported in the literature as well as, in some cases, the presence of a faint-end upturn.
  • We present a systematic study of the sub-sample of Shakhbazyan groups (SHKs) covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release--5 (SDSS-5). SHKs probe an environment with characteristics which are intermediate between those of loose and very compact groups. Surprisingly, we found that several groups identifying algorithms (e.g. Berlind et al. 2006, Tago et al. 2008) miss this type of structures. Using the SDSS-5 spectroscopic data and the photometric redshifts derived in D'Abrusco et al. 2007, we identified possible group members in photometric redshift space and derived, for each group, several individual properties. We also combined pointed and stacked Rosat All Sky Survey data to investigate the X-ray luminosities of these systems. Our study confirms that the majority of groups are physical entities with richness in the range 3--13 galaxies, and properties ranging between those of loose and compact groups. We confirm that SHK groups are richer in early-type galaxies than the surrounding environment and the field, as expected from the morphology-density relation and from the selection of groups of red galaxies. Furthermore, our work supports the existence of two sub-classes of structures, the first one being formed by compact and isolated groups and the second formed by extended structures. We suggest that while the first class of objects dwells in less dense regions like the outer parts of clusters or the field, possibly sharing the properties of Hickson Compact Groups, the more extended structures represent a mixture of [core+halo] configurations and cores of rich clusters. X-ray luminosities for SHKs are generally consistent with these results and with the expectations for the L_X-sigma_v relation, but also suggest the velocity dispersions reported in literature are underestimated for some of the richest systems.
  • We consider the possibility that masses and gravitational potentials of galaxy cluster, estimated at X-ray wavelengths, could be explained without assuming huge amounts of dark matter, but in the context of $f(R)$-gravity. Specifically, we take into account the weak field limit of such theories and show that the corrected gravitational potential allows to estimate the total mass of a sample of 12 clusters of galaxies. Results show that such a gravitational potential provides a fair fit to the mass of visible matter (i.e. gas + stars) estimated by X-ray observations, without the need of additional dark matter while the size of the clusters, as already observed at different scale for galaxies, strictly depends on the interaction lengths of the corrections to the Newtonian potential.
  • We perform a combined X-ray and strong lensing analysis of RX J1347.5-1145, one of the most luminous galaxy clusters at X-ray wavelengths. We show that evidence from strong lensing alone, based on published VLT and new HST data, strongly argues in favor of a complex structure. The analysis takes into account arc positions, shapes and orientations and is done thoroughly in the image plane. The cluster inner regions are well fitted by a bimodal mass distribution, with a total projected mass of $M_{tot} = (9.9 \pm 0.3)\times 10^{14} M_\odot/h$ within a radius of $360 \mathrm{kpc}/h$ ($1.5'$). Such a complex structure could be a signature of a recent major merger as further supported by X-ray data. A temperature map of the cluster, based on deep Chandra observations, reveals a hot front located between the first main component and an X-ray emitting South Eastern sub-clump. The map also unveils a filament of cold gas in the innermost regions of the cluster, most probably a cooling wake caused by the motion of the cD inside the cool core region. A merger scenario in the plane of the sky between two dark matter sub-clumps is consistent with both our lensing and X-ray analyses, and can explain previous discrepancies with mass estimates based on the virial theorem.
  • Modern photometric multiband digital surveys produce large amounts of data that, in order to be effectively exploited, need automatic tools capable to extract from photometric data an objective classification. We present here a new method for classifying objects in large multi-parametric photometric data bases, consisting of a combination of a clustering algorithm and a cluster agglomeration tool. The generalization capabilities and the potentialities of this approach are tested against the complexity of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey archive, for which an example of application is reported.
  • We present a new analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data aimed at producing a detailed map of the nearby (z < 0.5) universe. Using neural networks trained on the available spectroscopic base of knowledge we derived distance estimates for about 30 million galaxies distributed over ca. 8,000 sq. deg. We also used unsupervised clustering tools developed in the framework of the VO-Tech project, to investigate the possibility to understand the nature of each object present in the field and, in particular, to produce a list of candidate AGNs and QSOs.
  • We studied the X-ray properties of the Hickson Compact Group HCG62, in order to determine the properties and dynamic and evolutionary state of its hot gaseous halo. Our analysis reveals that the X-ray diffuse halo has an extremely complex morphological, thermal and chemical structure. Two deep cavities, due to the presence of the AGN hosted by the central galaxy NGC 4778, are clearly visible in the group X-ray halo. The cavities appear to be surrounded by ridges of cool gas. The group shows a cool core associated with the dominant galaxy. In the outer regions the temperature structure is quite regular, while the metal abundance shows a more patchy distribution, with large Si/O and Si/Fe ratios.
  • In the framework of the European VO-Tech project, we are implementing new machine learning methods specifically tailored to match the needs of astronomical data mining. In this paper, we shortly present the methods and discuss an application to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey public data set. In particular, we discuss some preliminary results on the 3-D taxonomy of the nearby (z < 0.5) universe. Using neural networks trained on the available spectroscopic base of knowledge we derived distance estimates for ca. 30 million galaxies distributed over 8,000 sq. deg. We also use unsupervised clustering tools to investigate whether it is possible to characterize in broad morphological bins the nature of each object and produce a reliable list of candidate AGNs and QSOs.
  • We present Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster AC114, which shows a strongly irregular morphology, with signs of multiple merging activity. We report the discovery of a soft X-ray filament originating close to the core of the cluster. We confirm that X-ray emission is associated with two of three mass concentrations identified in previous gravitational lensing studies of this object. These two mass concentrations are located at opposite ends of the soft filament, evidence for interaction between them. In the northern part, the cluster shows two sharp discontinuities, both in surface brightness and in temperature, evincing another, more recent merger event which took place in, or close, to the cluster core. In spite of the merger activity, a combined mass and lensing analysis shows remarkably good agreement between lensing and X-ray masses. We therefore advocate for the robustness of the X-ray mass estimates, and conclude that the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium can yield accurate mass estimates even in clusters as dynamically active as AC 114, once the gas density distribution is properly mapped.
  • We present an XMM observation of the distant galaxy cluster CL 0939+4713. The X-ray image shows pronounced substructure, with two main subclusters forming the cluster core. This is an indication that the cluster is a dynamically young system. This conclusion is supported by the temperature distribution: a hot region is found between the two main subclusters indicating that they are at the beginning of a major merger, and that they will collide in a few hundreds of Myr. The intra-cluster gas of CL 0939+4713 shows inhomogeneities in the metal distribution, with the optically richer subcluster having a higher metallicity.
  • The multiplicity function (MF) of groups and clusters of galaxies is determined using galaxy catalogues extracted from a set of Digitized Palomar Sky Survey (DPOSS) plates. The two different types of structures (of low and high richness) were identified using two different algorithms: a modified version of the van Albada method for groups, and a peak finding algorithm for larger structures. In a 300 sq. deg. area up to z<0.2, we find 2944 groups and 179 clusters. Our MF covers a wide range of richnesses, from 2 to 200, and the two MF's derived by the two algorithms match smoothly without the need for additional conditions or normalisations. The resulting multiplicity function, of slope alpha= -2.08 +- 0.07, strongly resembles a power law.
  • RBS797 and CL 0939+4713 are two intermediate red-shift clusters ($z=0.35-0.41$). They have very different morphologies but both show surprisingly interesting structures. RBS797 looks relaxed, with an almost circular morphology; a CHANDRA observation of this cluster has revealed two deep depressions in the X-ray emission near the core. CL 0939+4713 has instead an irregular morphology with evident substructures which seem to be in the process of merging.
  • We present CHANDRA observations of the X-ray luminous, distant galaxy cluster RBS797 at z=0.35. In the central region the X-ray emission shows two pronounced X-ray minima, which are located opposite to each other with respect to the cluster centre. These depressions suggest an interaction between the central radio galaxy and the intra-cluster medium, which would be the first detection in such a distant cluster. The minima are symmetric relative to the cluster centre and very deep compared to similar features found in a few other nearby clusters. A spectral and morphological analysis of the overall cluster emission shows that RBS797 is a hot cluster (T=7.7^{+1.2}_{-1.0} keV) with a total mass of M_{tot}(r_{500})=6.5^{+1.6}_{-1.2} 10^{14} \msol.
  • The projected multiplicity function of galaxies gives (per square degree) the density of galaxy aggregates formed by N members. We use the CRoNaRio matched catalogues to derive the low N (N<15) multiplicity function from D-POSS data. The van Albada (1982) algorithm was implemented and used to identify candidate groups in the CRoNaRio catalogues. In absence of redshift surveys complete down to the magnitude limit of the DPOSS material and covering a wide enough area, the performances of the algorithm were tested on realistically simulated catalogues. The application to a set of 13 CRoNaRio catalogues allowed us to derive a multiplicity function as accurate as those available in literature obtained from redshift surveys.