• The benchmark exoplanet GJ 1214b is one of the best studied transiting planets in the transition zone between rocky Earth-sized planets and gas or ice giants. This class of super-Earth/mini-Neptune planets is unknown in our Solar System, yet is one of the most frequently detected classes of exoplanets. Understanding the transition from rocky to gaseous planets is a crucial step in the exploration of extrasolar planetary systems, in particular with regard to the potential habitability of this class of planets. GJ 1214b has already been studied in detail from various platforms at many different wavelengths. Our airborne observations with SOFIA add information in the Paschen-alpha cont. 1.9 micron infrared wavelength band, which is not accessible by any other current ground- or space-based instrument due to telluric absorption or limited spectral coverage. We used FLIPO and FPI+ on SOFIA to comprehensively analyse the transmission signal of the possible water-world GJ 1214b through photometric observations during transit in three optical and one infrared channels. We present four simultaneous light curves and corresponding transit depths in three optical and one infrared channel, which we compare to previous observations and state-of-the-art synthetic atmospheric models of GJ 1214b. The final precision in transit depth is between 1.5 and 2.5 times the theoretical photon noise limit, not sensitive enough to constrain the theoretical models any better than previous observations. This is the first exoplanet observation with SOFIA that uses its full set of instruments available to exoplanet spectrophotometry. Therefore we use these results to evaluate SOFIA's potential in this field and suggest future improvements.
  • Motion of short-period stars orbiting the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center has been monitored for more than 20 years. These observations are currently offering a new way to test the gravitational theory in an unexplored regime: in a strong gravitational field, around a supermassive black hole. In this proceeding, we present three results: (i) a constraint on a hypothetical fifth force obtained by using 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars S0-2 and S0-38 ; (ii) an upper limit on the secular advance of the argument of the periastron for the star S0-2 ; (iii) a sensitivity analysis showing that the relativistic redshift of S0-2 will be measured after its closest approach to the black hole in 2018.
  • In this Letter, we demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic Center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from General Relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of $\left|\alpha\right| < 0.016$ at a length scale of $\lambda=$ 150 astronomical units. We also derive a 95% confidence upper limit on a linear drift of the argument of periastron of the short-period star S0-2 of $\left|\dot \omega_\textrm{S0-2} \right|< 1.6 \times 10^{-3}$ rad/yr, which can be used to constrain various gravitational and astrophysical theories. This analysis provides the first fully self-consistent test of the gravitational theory using orbital dynamic in a strong gravitational regime, that of a supermassive black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.
  • We present new, more precise measurements of the mass and distance of our Galaxy's central supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. These results stem from a new analysis that more than doubles the time baseline for astrometry of faint stars orbiting Sgr A*, combining two decades of speckle imaging and adaptive optics data. Specifically, we improve our analysis of the speckle images by using information about a star's orbit from the deep adaptive optics data (2005 - 2013) to inform the search for the star in the speckle years (1995 - 2005). When this new analysis technique is combined with the first complete re-reduction of Keck Galactic Center speckle images using speckle holography, we are able to track the short-period star S0-38 (K-band magnitude = 17, orbital period = 19 years) through the speckle years. We use the kinematic measurements from speckle holography and adaptive optics to estimate the orbits of S0-38 and S0-2 and thereby improve our constraints of the mass ($M_{bh}$) and distance ($R_o$) of Sgr A*: $M_{bh} = 4.02\pm0.16\pm0.04\times10^6~M_{\odot}$ and $7.86\pm0.14\pm0.04$ kpc. The uncertainties in $M_{bh}$ and $R_o$ as determined by the combined orbital fit of S0-2 and S0-38 are improved by a factor of 2 and 2.5, respectively, compared to an orbital fit of S0-2 alone and a factor of $\sim$2.5 compared to previous results from stellar orbits. This analysis also limits the extended dark mass within 0.01 pc to less than $0.13\times10^{6}~M_{\odot}$ at 99.7% confidence, a factor of 3 lower compared to prior work.
  • We present medium resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectra, covering 1.1 to 3.4 microns, of the normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2014J in M82 obtained with the FLITECAM instrument aboard SOFIA approximately 17-25 days after maximum B light. Our 2.8-3.4 micron spectra may be the first ~3 micron spectra of a SN Ia ever published. The spectra spanning the 1.5-2.7 micron range are characterized by a strong emission feature at ~1.77 microns with a full width at half maximum of ~11,000-13,000 km/s. We compare the observed FLITECAM spectra to the recent non-LTE delayed detonation models of Dessart et al. (2014) and find that the models agree with the spectra remarkably well in the 1.5-2.7 micron wavelength range. Based on this comparison we identify the ~1.77 micron emission peak as a blend of permitted lines of Co II. Other features seen in the 2.0 - 2.5 micron spectra are also identified as emission from permitted transitions of Co II. However, the models are not as successful at reproducing the spectra in the 1.1 - 1.4 micron range or between 2.8 and 3.4 microns. These observations demonstrate the promise of SOFIA by allowing access to wavelength regions inaccessible from the ground, and serve to draw attention to the usefulness of the regions between the standard ground-based NIR passbands for constraining SN models.
  • We present the first detection from the Spitzer Space Telescope of 4.5 micron variability from Sgr A*, the emitting source associated with the Milky Way's central black hole. The >23 hour continuous light curve was obtained with the IRAC instrument in 2013 December. The result characterizes the variability of Sgr A* prior to the closest approach of the G2 object, a putative infalling gas cloud that orbits close to Sgr A*. The high stellar density at the location of Sgr A* produces a background of ~250 mJy at 4.5 microns in each pixel with a large pixel-to-pixel gradient, but the light curve for the highly variable Sgr A* source was successfully measured by modeling and removing the variations due to pointing wobble. The observed flux densities range from the noise level of ~0.7 mJy rms in a 6.4-s measurement to ~10 mJy. Emission was seen above the noise level ~34% of the time. The light curve characteristics, including the flux density distribution and structure function, are consistent with those previously derived at shorter infrared wavelengths. We see no evidence in the light curve for activity attributable to the G2 interaction at the observing epoch, ~100 days before the expected G2 periapsis passage. The IRAC light curve is more than a factor of two longer than any previous infrared observation, improving constraints on the timescale of the break in the power spectral distribution of Sgr A* flux densities. The data favor the longer of the two previously published values for the timescale.
  • We present 19.7, 31.5, and 37.1 {\mu}m images of the inner 6 pc of the Galactic Center of the Milky Way with a spatial resolution of 3.2 - 4.6'' taken by the Faint Object Infrared Camera on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The images reveal in detail the "clumpy" structure of the Circumnuclear Ring (CNR)--the torus of hot gas and dust orbiting the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center with an inner radius of 1.4 pc. The CNR exhibits features of a classic HII region: the dust emission at 19.7 {\mu}m closely traces the ionized gas emission observed in the radio while the 31.5 and 37.1 {\mu}m emission traces the photo-dissociation region beyond the ionized gas. The 19.7/37.1 color temperature map reveals a radial temperature gradient across the CNR with temperatures ranging from 65-85 K, consistent with the prevailing paradigm in which the dust is centrally heated by the inner cluster of hot, young stars. We produce a 37.1 {\mu}m intensity model of the CNR with the derived geometric properties and find that it is consistent with the observed 37.1 {\mu}m map of the CNR. Dense ($5 to 9 \times 10^{4} \, \mathrm{cm}^{-3}$) clumps with a FWHM of ~0.15 pc exist along the inner edge of the CNR and shadow the material deeper into the ring. The clumps are unlikely to be long-lived structures since they are not dense enough to be stable against tidal shear from the supermassive black hole.
  • We present new observations and analysis of G2 - the intriguing red emission-line object which is quickly approaching the Galaxy's central black hole. The observations were obtained with the laser guide star adaptive optics systems on the W. M. Keck I and II telescopes and include spectroscopy (R ~ 3600) centered on the Hydrogen Br-gamma line as well as K' (2.1 micrometer) and L' (3.8 micrometer) imaging. Analysis of these observations shows the Br-gamma line emission has a positional offset from the L' continuum. This offset is likely due to background source confusion at L'. We therefore present the first orbital solution derived from Br-gamma line astrometry, which when coupled with radial velocity measurements, results in a later time of closest approach (2014.21 +/- 0.14), closer periastron (130 AU, 1900Rs), and higher eccentricity (0.9814 +/- 0.0060) compared to a solution using L' astrometry. The new orbit casts doubt on previous associations of G2 and a low surface brightness "tail". It is shown that G2 has no K' counterpart down to K' ~ 20 mag. G2's L' continuum and the Br-gamma line-emission is unresolved in almost all epochs; however it is marginally extended in our highest quality Br-gamma data set from 2006 and exhibits a clear velocity gradient at that time. While the observations altogether suggest that G2 has a gaseous component which is tidally interacting with the central black hole, there is likely a central star providing the self-gravity necessary to sustain the compact nature of this object.
  • We have made the first detection of a near-infrared counterpart associated with the disk around Radio Source "I," a massive protostar in the Kleinmann-Low Nebula in Orion using imaging with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. The infrared emission is evident in images acquired using L' (3.8 microns) and Ms (4.7 microns) filters and is not detectable at K' (2.1 microns). The observed morphology strongly suggests that we are seeing some combination of scattered and thermal light emanating from the disk. The disk is also manifest in the L'/Ms flux ratio image. We interpret the near-infrared emission as the illuminated surface of a nearly edge-on disk, oriented so that only the northern face is visible; the opposite surface remains hidden by the disk. We do not see infrared radiation associated directly with the star proposed to be associated with Source "I." The data also suggest that there is a cavity above and below the disk that is oriented perpendicular to the disk, and is sculpted by the known, strong outflow from the inner disk of Source I. We compare our data to models of a protostar with a surrounding disk, envelope, and wind-blown cavity in order to elucidate the nature of the disk around Radio Source I.
  • Stars with short orbital periods at the center of our galaxy offer a powerful and unique probe of a supermassive black hole. Over the past 17 years, the W. M. Keck Observatory has been used to image the Galactic center at the highest angular resolution possible today. By adding to this data set and advancing methodologies, we have detected S0-102, a star orbiting our galaxy's supermassive black hole with a period of just 11.5 years. S0-102 doubles the number of stars with full phase coverage and periods less than 20 years. It thereby provides the opportunity with future measurements to resolve degeneracies in the parameters describing the central gravitational potential and to test Einstein's theory of General Relativity in an unexplored regime.
  • The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory consisting of a specially modified Boeing 747SP with a 2.7-m telescope, flying at altitudes as high as 13.7 km (45,000 ft). Designed to observe at wavelengths from 0.3 micron to 1.6 mm, SOFIA operates above 99.8 % of the water vapor that obscures much of the infrared and submillimeter. SOFIA has seven science instruments under development, including an occultation photometer, near-, mid-, and far-infrared cameras, infrared spectrometers, and heterodyne receivers. SOFIA, a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center DLR, began initial science flights in 2010 December, and has conducted 30 science flights in the subsequent year. During this early science period three instruments have flown: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and the occultation photometer HIPO. This article provides an overview of the observatory and its early performance.
  • We present new mid-infrared images of the central region of the Orion Nebula using the newly commissioned SOFIA airborne telescope and its 5 -- 40 micron camera FORCAST. The 37.1 micron images represent the highest resolution observations (<4") ever obtained of this region at these wavelengths. After BN/KL (which is described in a separate letter in this issue), the dominant source at all wavelengths except 37.1 micron is the Ney-Allen Nebula, a crescent-shaped extended source associated with theta 1D. The morphology of the Ney-Allen nebula in our images is consistent with the interpretation that it is ambient dust swept up by the stellar wind from theta 1D, as suggested by Smith et al. (2005). Our observations also reveal emission from two "proplyds" (proto-planetary disks), and a few embedded young stellar objects (YSOs; IRc9, and OMC1S IRS1, 2, and 10). The spectral energy distribution for IRc9 is presented and fitted with standard YSO models from Robitaille et al. (2007) to constrain the total luminosity, disk size, and envelope size. The diffuse, nebular emission we observe at all FORCAST wavelengths is most likely from the background photodissociation region (PDR) and shows structure that coincides roughly with H_alpha and [N II] emission. We conclude that the spatial variations in the diffuse emission are likely due to undulations in the surface of the background PDR.
  • We present 37\micron\ imaging of the S140 complex of infrared sources centered on IRS1 made with the FORCAST camera on SOFIA. These observations are the longest wavelength imaging to resolve clearly the three main sources seen at shorter wavelengths, IRS 1, 2 and 3, and are nearly at the diffraction limit of the 2.5-m telescope. We also obtained a small number of images at 11 and 31\micron\ that are useful for flux measurement. Our images cover the area of several strong sub-mm sources seen in the area -- SMM 1, 2, and 3 -- that are not coincident with any mid-infrared sources and are not visible in our longer wavelength imaging either. Our new observations confirm previous estimates of the relative dust optical depth and source luminosity for the components in this likely cluster of early B stars. We also investigate the use of super-resolution to go beyond the basic diffraction limit in imaging on SOFIA and find that the van Cittert algorithm, together with the "multi-resolution" technique, provides excellent results.
  • The massive star forming region W3 was observed with the faint object infrared camera for the SOFIA telescope (FORCAST) as part of the Short Science program. The 6.4, 6.6, 7.7, 19.7, 24.2, 31.5 and 37.1 \um bandpasses were used to observe the emission of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, Very Small Grains and Big Grains. Optical depth and color temperature maps of W3A show that IRS2 has blown a bubble devoid of gas and dust of $\sim$0.05 pc radius. It is embedded in a dusty shell of ionized gas that contributes 40% of the total 24 \um emission of W3A. This dust component is mostly heated by far ultraviolet, rather than trapped Ly$\alpha$ photons. This shell is itself surrounded by a thin ($\sim$0.01 pc) photodissociation region where PAHs show intense emission. The infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of three different zones located at 8, 20 and 25\arcsec from IRS2, show that the peak of the SED shifts towards longer wavelengths, when moving away from the star. Adopting the stellar radiation field for these three positions, DUSTEM model fits to these SEDs yield a dust-to-gas mass ratio in the ionized gas similar to that in the diffuse ISM. However, the ratio of the IR-to-UV opacity of the dust in the ionized shell is increased by a factor $\simeq$3 compared to the diffuse ISM.
  • The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a joint U.S./German project, is a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope carried by a Boeing 747-SP that flies in the stratosphere at altitudes as high as 45,000 feet (13.72 km). This facility is capable of observing from 0.3 {\mu}m to 1.6 mm with an average transmission greater than 80 percent. SOFIA will be staged out of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center aircraft operations facility at Palmdale, CA. The SOFIA Science Mission Operations (SMO) will be located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. First science flights began in 2010 and a full operations schedule of up to one hundred 8 to 10 hour flights per year will be reached by 2014. The observatory is expected to operate until the mid 2030's. SOFIAs initial complement of seven focal plane instruments includes broadband imagers, moderate-resolution spectrographs that will resolve broad features due to dust and large molecules, and high-resolution spectrometers capable of studying the kinematics of atomic and molecular gas at sub-km/s resolution. We describe the SOFIA facility and outline the opportunities for observations by the general scientific community and for future instrumentation development. The operational characteristics of the SOFIA first-generation instruments are summarized. The status of the flight test program is discussed and we show First Light images obtained at wavelengths from 5.4 to 37 \"im with the FORCAST imaging camera. Additional information about SOFIA is available at http://www.sofia.usra.edu and http://www.sofia.usra.edu/Science/docs/SofiaScienceVision051809-1.pdf
  • Spitzer Space Telescope photometry and spectroscopy of BD +20 307 show that all of the dust around this remarkable Gyr-old spectroscopic binary arises within 1 AU. No additional cold dust is needed to fit the infrared excess. Peaks in the 10 and 20 micron spectrum are well fit with small silicates that should be removed on a timescale of years from the system. This is the dustiest star known for its age, which is >1 Gyr. The dust cannot arise from a steady-state collisional cascade. A catastrophic collision of two rocky, planetary-scale bodies in the terrestrial zone is the most likely source for this warm dust because it does not require a reservoir of planetesimals in the outer system.
  • We have obtained high spatial resolution imaging observations of the HR 4796A circumstellar debris dust ring using the broad optical response of the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in coronagraphic mode. We use our visual wavelength observations to improve upon the earlier measured geometrical parameters of the ring-like disk. Two significant flux density asymmetries are noted: (1) preferential forward scattering by the disk grains and (2) an azimuthal surface brightness anisotropy about the morphological minor axis of the disk with corresponding differential ansal brightness. We find the debris ring offset from the location of the star by ~1.4 AU, a shift insufficient to explain the differing brightnesses of the NE and SW ansae simply by the 1/$r^2$ dimmunition of starlight. The STIS data also better quantify the radial confinement of the starlight-scattering circumstellar debris, to a characteristic region <14 AU in photometric half-width, with a significantly steeper inner truncation than outward falloff in radial surface brightness. The inferred spatial distribution of the disk grains is consistent with the possibility of one or more unseen co-orbital planetary-mass perturbers, and the colors of the disk grains are consistent with a collisionally evolved population of debris, possibly including ices reddened by radiation exposure to the central star.
  • We present new proper motions from the 10 m Keck telescopes for a puzzling population of massive, young stars located within 3.5" (0.14 pc) of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. Our proper motion measurements have uncertainties of only 0.07 mas/yr (3 km/s), which is ~7 times better than previous proper motion measurements for these stars, and enables us to measure accelerations as low as 0.2 mas/yr^2 (7 km/s/yr). Using these measurements, line-of-sight velocities from the literature, and 3D velocities for additional young stars in the central parsec, we constrain the true orbit of each individual star and directly test the hypothesis that the massive stars reside in two stellar disks as has been previously proposed. Analysis of the stellar orbits reveals only one of the previously proposed disks of young stars using a method that is capable of detecting disks containing at least 7 stars. The detected disk contains 50% of the young stars, is inclined by ~115 deg from the plane of the sky, and is oriented at a position angle of ~100 deg East of North. Additionally, the on-disk and off-disk populations have similar K-band luminosity functions and radial distributions that decrease at larger projected radii as \propto r^-2. The disk has an out-of-the-disk velocity dispersion of 28 +/- 6 km/s, which corresponds to a half-opening angle of 7 +/- 2 deg, and several candidate disk members have eccentricities greater than 0.2. Our findings suggest that the young stars may have formed in situ but in a more complex geometry than a simple, thin circular disk.
  • We report new precision measurements of the properties of our Galaxy's supermassive black hole. Based on astrometric (1995-2007) and radial velocity (2000-2007) measurements from the W. M. Keck 10-meter telescopes, a fully unconstrained Keplerian orbit for the short period star S0-2 provides values for Ro of 8.0+-0.6 kpc, M_bh of 4.1+-0.6x10^6 Mo, and the black hole's radial velocity, which is consistent with zero with 30 km/s uncertainty. If the black hole is assumed to be at rest with respect to the Galaxy, we can further constrain the fit and obtain Ro = 8.4+-0.4 kpc and M_bh = 4.5+-0.4x10^6 Mo. More complex models constrain the extended dark mass distribution to be less than 3-4x10^5 Mo within 0.01 pc, ~100x higher than predictions from stellar and stellar remnant models. For all models, we identify transient astrometric shifts from source confusion and the assumptions regarding the black hole's radial motion as previously unrecognized limitations on orbital accuracy and the usefulness of fainter stars. Future astrometric and RV observations will remedy these effects. Our estimates of Ro and the Galaxy's local rotation speed, which it is derived from combining Ro with the apparent proper motion of Sgr A*, (theta0 = 229+-18 km/s), are compatible with measurements made using other methods. The increased black hole mass found in this study, compared to that determined using projected mass estimators, implies a longer period for the innermost stable orbit, longer resonant relaxation timescales for stars in the vicinity of the black hole and a better agreement with the M_bh-sigma relation.
  • This paper presents a sensitive and comprehensive IRAC 3-8 $\mu$m photometric survey of white dwarfs for companions in the planetary mass regime with temperatures cooler than the known T dwarfs. The search focuses on descendents of intermediate mass stars with $M\ga3$ $M_{\odot}$ whose inner, few hundred AU regions cannot be probed effectively for massive planets and brown dwarfs by any alternative existing method. Furthermore, examination for mid-infrared excess explores an extensive range of orbital semimajor axes, including the intermediate 5-50 AU range poorly covered and incompletely accessible by other techniques at main sequence or evolved stars. Three samples of white dwarfs are chosen which together represent relatively young as well as older populations of stars: 9 open cluster white dwarfs, 22 high mass field white dwarfs, and 17 metal-rich field white dwarfs. In particular, these targets include: 7 Hyads and 4 field white dwarfs of similar age; 1 Pleiad and 19 field white dwarfs of similar age; van Maanen 2 and 16 similarly metal-rich white dwarfs with ages between 1 and 7 Gyr. No substellar companion candidates were identified at any star. By demanding a 15% minimum photometric excess at 4.5 $\mu$m to indicate a companion detection, upper limits in the planetary mass regime are established at 34 of the sample white dwarfs, 20 of which have limits below 10 $M_{\rm J}$ according to substellar cooling models. Specifically, limits below the minimum mass for deuterium burning are established at all Pleiades and Hyadeswhite dwarfs, as well as similarly young field white dwarfs, half a dozen of which receive limits at or below 5 $M_{\rm J}$. Two IRAC epochs at vMa 2 rule out $T\ga200$ K proper motion companions within 1200 AU.
  • This paper presents the results of a Spitzer IRAC 3-8 micron photometric search for warm dust orbiting 17 nearby, metal-rich white dwarfs, 15 of which apparently have hydrogen dominated atmospheres (type DAZ). G166-58, G29-38, and GD 362 manifest excess emission in their IRAC fluxes and the latter two are known to harbor dust grains warm enough to radiate detectable emission at near-infrared wavelengths as short as 2 micron. Their IRAC fluxes display differences compatible with a relatively larger amount of cooler dust at GD 362. G166-58 is presently unique in that it appears to exhibit excess flux only at wavelengths longer than about 5 micron. Evidence is presented that this mid-infrared emission is most likely associated with the white dwarf, indicating that G166-58 bears circumstellar dust no warmer than T~400 K. The remaining 14 targets reveal no reliable mid-infrared excess, indicating the majority of DAZ stars do not have warm debris disks sufficiently opaque to be detected by IRAC.
  • We report the first time-series of broadband infrared (IR) color measurements of Sgr A*, the variable emission source associated with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. Using the laser and natural guide star AO systems on the Keck II telescope, we imaged Sgr A* in multiple near-infrared broadband filters with a typical cycle time of ~3 min during 4 observing runs (2005-2006), two of which were simultaneous with Chandra X-ray measurements. In spite of the large range of dereddened flux densities for Sgr A* (2-30 mJy), all of our near-IR measurements are consistent with a constant spectral index of alpha = -0.6+-0.2. Furthermore, this value is consistent with the spectral indices observed at X-ray wavelengths during nearly all outbursts; which is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton model for the production of the X-ray emission. During the coordinated observations, one IR outburst occurs <36 min after a possibly associated X-ray outburst, while several similar IR outbursts show no elevated X-ray emission. A variable X-ray to IR ratio and constant infrared spectral index challenge the notion that the IR and X-ray emission are connected to the same electrons. We, therefore, posit that the population of electrons responsible for both the IR and X-ray emission are generated by an acceleration mechanism that leaves the bulk of the electron energy distribution responsible for the IR emission unchanged, but has a variable high-energy cutoff. Occasionally a tail of electrons >1 GeV is generated, and it is this high-energy tail that gives rise to the X-ray outbursts. One possible explanation for this type of variation is from the turbulence induced by a magnetorotational instability, in which the outer scale length of the turbulence varies and changes the high-energy cutoff.
  • Multi-band (0.9 to 1.6 um) images of the TW Hydrae Association (TWA) brown dwarf, 2MASS J1207334-393254 (also known as 2M1207), and its candidate planetary mass companion (2M1207b) were obtained on 2004 Aug 28 and 2005 Apr 26 with HST/NICMOS. The images from these two epochs unequivocally confirm the two objects as a common proper motion pair (16.0 sigma confidence). A new measurement of the proper motion of 2M1207 implies a distance to the system of 59+-7 pc and a projected separation of 46+-5 AU. The NICMOS and previously published VLT photometry of 2M1207b, extending overall from 0.9 to 3.8 um, are fully consistent with an object of a few Jupiter masses at the canonical age of a TWA member (~8 Myr) based on evolutionary models of young giant planets. These observations provide information on the physical nature of 2M1207b and unambiguously establish that the first direct image of a planetary mass companion in orbit around a self-luminous body, other than our Sun, has been secured.
  • We present high-resolution near-infrared spectra, obtained with the NIRSPEC spectrograph on the W. M. Keck II Telescope, of a collection of hot, massive stars within the central 25 arcseconds of the Galactic center. We have identified a total of twenty-one emission-line stars, seven of which are new radial velocity detections with five of those being classified as He I emission-line stars for the first time. These stars fall into two categories based on their spectral properties: 1) those with narrow 2.112, 2.113 micron He I doublet absorption lines, and 2) those with broad 2.058 micron He I emission lines. These data have the highest spectral resolution ever obtained for these sources and, as a result, both components of the absorption doublet are separately resolved for the first time. We use these spectral features to measure radial velocities. The majority of the measured radial velocities have relative errors of 20 kms, smaller than those previously obtained with proper-motion or radial velocity measurements for similar stellar samples in the Galactic center. The radial velocities estimated from the He I absorption doublet are more robust than those previously estimated from the 2.058 micron emission line, since they do not suffer from confusion due to emission from the surrounding ISM. Using this velocity information, we agree that the stars are orbiting in a somewhat coherent manner but are not as defined into a disk or disks as previously thought. Finally, multi-epoch radial velocity measurements for IRS 16NE show a change in its velocity presumably due to an unseen stellar companion.
  • (Abridged) We present the first Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGS-AO) observations of the Galactic center. LGS-AO has dramatically improved the quality, robustness, and versatility with which high angular resolution infrared images of the Galactic center can be obtained with the W. M. Keck II 10-meter telescope. Specifically, Strehl ratios of 0.7 and 0.3 at L'[3.8 micron] and K'[2.1 micron], respectively, are achieved in these LGS-AO images. During our observations, the infrared counterpart to the central supermassive black hole, Sgr A*-IR, showed significant infrared intensity variations, with observed L' magnitudes ranging from 12.6 to 14.5 mag. The faintest end of our L' detections, 1.3 mJy (dereddened), is the lowest level of emission yet observed for this source by a factor of 3. No significant variation in the location of SgrA*-IR is detected as a function of either wavelength or intensity. Near a peak in its intensity, we obtained the first measurement of SgrA*-IR's K'-L' color (3.0 +- 0.2 mag, observed), which corresponds to an intrinsic spectral index of -0.5 +- 0.3. This is significantly bluer than other recent infrared measurements. Because our measurement was taken at a time when Sgr A* was ~6 times brighter in the infrared than the other measurements, we posit that the spectral index of the emission arising from the vicinity of our Galaxy's central black hole may depend on the strength of the flare, with stronger flares giving rise to a higher fraction of high energy electrons in the emitting region.