• A detailed knowledge of stellar activity is crucial for understanding stellar dynamos, as well as pushing exoplanet radial-velocity detection limits towards Earth analogue confirmation. We directly compare archival HARPS spectra taken at the minimum in $\alpha$ Cen B's activity cycle to a high-activity state when clear rotational modulation of $\log{R'_{HK}}$ is visible. Relative to the inactive spectra, we find a large number of narrow pseudo-emission features in the active spectra with strengths that are rotationally modulated. These features most likely originate from plage, spots, or a combination of both. They also display radial velocity variations of $\sim$300 m s$^{-1}$ - consistent with an active region rotating across the stellar surface. Furthermore, we see evidence that some of the lines originating from the `active immaculate' photosphere appear broader relative to the `inactive immaculate' case. This may be due to enhanced contributions of e.g. magnetic bright points to these lines, which then causes additional line broadening. More detailed analysis may enable measurements of plage and spot coverage using single spectra in the future.
  • We report the first ground-based detections of the shallow transit of the super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e using a 2-meter-class telescope. Using differential spectrophotometry, we observed one transit in 2013 and another in 2014, with average spectral resolutions of ~700 and ~250, spanning the Johnson BVR photometric bands. We find a white-light planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.0190 -0.0027+0.0023 from the 2013 observations and 0.0200 -0.0018+0.0017 from the 2014 observations. The two datasets combined results in a radius ratio of 0.0198 -0.0014+0.0013. These values are all in agreement with previous space-based results. Scintillation noise in the data prevents us from placing strong constraints on the presence of an extended hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Nevertheless, our detections of 55 Cnc e in transit demonstrate that moderate-size telescopes on the ground will be capable of routine follow-up observations of super-Earth candidates discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) around bright stars. We expect it will be also possible to place constraints on the atmospheric characteristics of those planets by devising observational strategies to minimize scintillation noise.
  • We report the discovery of WTS-2 b, an unusually close-in 1.02-day hot Jupiter (Mp=1.12MJ, Rp=1.363RJ) orbiting a K2V star, which has a possible gravitationally-bound M-dwarf companion at 0.6 arcsec separation contributing ~20 percent of the total flux in the observed J-band light curve. The planet is only 1.5 times the separation from its host star at which it would be destroyed by Roche lobe overflow, and has a predicted remaining lifetime of just ~40 Myr, assuming a tidal dissipation quality factor of Q'*=10^6. Q'* is a key factor in determining how frictional processes within a host star affect the orbital evolution of its companion giant planets, but it is currently poorly constrained by observations. We calculate that the orbital decay of WTS-2 b would correspond to a shift in its transit arrival time of T_shift~17 seconds after 15 years assuming Q'*=10^6. A shift less than this would place a direct observational constraint on the lower limit of Q'* in this system. We also report a correction to the previously published expected T_shift for WASP-18 b, finding that T_shift=356 seconds after 10 years for Q'*=10^6, which is much larger than the estimated 28 seconds quoted in WASP-18 b discovery paper. We attempted to constrain Q'* via a study of the entire population of known transiting hot Jupiters, but our results were inconclusive, requiring a more detailed treatment of transit survey sensitivities at long periods. We conclude that the most informative and straight-forward constraints on Q'* will be obtained by direct observational measurements of the shift in transit arrival times in individual hot Jupiter systems. We show that this is achievable across the mass spectrum of exoplanet host stars within a decade, and will directly probe the effects of stellar interior structure on tidal dissipation.
  • We report a 4.8 sigma detection of water absorption features in the day side spectrum of the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b. We used high-resolution (R~100,000) spectra taken at 3.2 microns with CRIRES on the VLT to trace the radial-velocity shift of the water features in the planet's day side atmosphere during 5 h of its 2.2 d orbit as it approached secondary eclipse. Despite considerable telluric contamination in this wavelength regime, we detect the signal within our uncertainties at the expected combination of systemic velocity (Vsys=-3 +5-6 km/s) and planet orbital velocity (Kp=154 +14-10 km/s), and determine a H2O line contrast ratio of (1.3+/-0.2)x10^-3 with respect to the stellar continuum. We find no evidence of significant absorption or emission from other carbon-bearing molecules, such as methane, although we do note a marginal increase in the significance of our detection to 5.1 sigma with the inclusion of carbon dioxide in our template spectrum. This result demonstrates that ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy is suited to finding not just simple molecules like CO, but also to more complex molecules like H2O even in highly telluric contaminated regions of the Earth's transmission spectrum. It is a powerful tool that can be used for conducting an immediate census of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules in the atmospheres of giant planets, and will potentially allow the formation and migration history of these planets to be constrained by the measurement of their atmospheric C/O ratios.
  • In this paper we present ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy of 51 Pegasi using CRIRES at the Very Large Telescope. The system was observed for 3x5 hours at 2.3 {\mu}m at a spectral resolution of R = 100,000, targeting potential signatures from carbon monoxide, water vapour and methane in the planet's dayside spectrum. In the first 2x5 hours of data, we find a combined signal from carbon monoxide and water in absorption at a formal 5.9{\sigma} confidence level, indicating a non-inverted atmosphere. We derive a planet mass of M_P = (0.46 +- 0.02) M_Jup and an orbital inclination i between 79.6 and 82.2 degrees, with the upper limit set by the non-detection of the planet transit in previous photometric monitoring. However, there is no trace of the signal in the final 5 hours of data. A statistical analysis indicates that the signal from the first two nights is robust, but we find no compelling explanation for its absence in the final night. The latter suffers from stronger noise residuals and greater instrumental instability than the first two nights, but these cannot fully account for the missing signal. It is possible that the integrated dayside emission from 51 Peg b is instead strongly affected by weather. However, more data are required before we can claim any time variability in the planet's atmosphere.
  • In recent years, day-side emission from about a dozen hot Jupiters has been detected through ground-based secondary eclipse observations in the near-infrared. These near-infrared observations are vital for determining the energy budgets of hot Jupiters, since they probe the planet's spectral energy distribution near its peak. The aim of this work is to measure the Ks-band secondary eclipse depth of WASP-33b, the first planet discovered to transit an A-type star. This planet receives the highest level of irradiation of all transiting planets discovered to date. Furthermore, its host-star shows pulsations and is classified as a low-amplitude delta-Scuti. As part of our GROUnd-based Secondary Eclipse (GROUSE) project we have obtained observations of two separate secondary eclipses of WASP-33b in the Ks-band using the LIRIS instrument on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT). The telescope was significantly defocused to avoid saturation of the detector for this bright star (K~7.5). To increase the stability and the cadence of the observations, they were performed in staring mode. We collected a total of 5100 and 6900 frames for the first and the second night respectively, both with an average cadence of 3.3 seconds. On the second night the eclipse is detected at the 12-sigma level, with a measured eclipse depth of 0.244+0.027-0.020 %. This eclipse depth corresponds to a brightness temperature of 3270+115-160 K. The measured brightness temperature on the second night is consistent with the expected equilibrium temperature for a planet with a very low albedo and a rapid re-radiation of the absorbed stellar light. For the other night the short out-of-eclipse baseline prevents good corrections for the stellar pulsations and systematic effects, which makes this dataset unreliable for eclipse depth measurements. This demonstrates the need of getting a sufficient out-of-eclipse baseline.
  • We report the discovery of 16 detached M-dwarf eclipsing binaries with J<16 mag and provide a detailed characterisation of three of them, using high-precision infrared light curves from the WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS). Such systems provide the most accurate and model-independent method for measuring the fundamental parameters of these poorly understood yet numerous stars, which currently lack sufficient observations to precisely calibrate stellar evolution models. We fully solve for the masses and radii of three of the systems, finding orbital periods in the range 1.5<P<4.9 days, with masses spanning 0.35-0.50 Msun and radii between 0.38-0.50 Rsun, with uncertainties of ~3.5-6.4% in mass and ~2.7-5.5% in radius. Close-companions in short-period binaries are expected to be tidally-locked into fast rotational velocities, resulting in high levels of magnetic activity. This is predicted to inflate their radii by inhibiting convective flow and increasing star spot coverage. The radii of the WTS systems are inflated above model predictions by ~3-12%, in agreement with the observed trend, despite an expected lower systematic contribution from star spots signals at infrared wavelengths. We searched for correlation between the orbital period and radius inflation by combining our results with all existing M-dwarf radius measurements of comparable precision, but we found no statistically significant evidence for a decrease in radius inflation for longer period, less active systems. Radius inflation continues to exists in non-synchronised systems indicating that the problem remains even for very low activity M-dwarfs. Resolving this issue is vital not only for understanding the most populous stars in the Universe, but also for characterising their planetary companions, which hold the best prospects for finding Earth-like planets in the traditional habitable zone.
  • Context: Only recently it has become possible to measure the thermal emission from hot-Jupiters at near-Infrared wavelengths using ground-based telescopes, by secondary eclipse observations. This allows the planet flux to be probed around the peak of its spectral energy distribution, which is vital for the understanding of its energy budget. Aims: The aim of the reported work is to measure the eclipse depth of the planet HAT-P-1b at 2.2micron. This planet is an interesting case, since the amount of stellar irradiation it receives falls in between that of the two best studied systems (HD209458 and HD189733), and it has been suggested to have a weak thermal inversion layer. Methods: We have used the LIRIS instrument on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) to observe the secondary eclipse of HATP-1b in the Ks-band, as part of our Ground-based secondary eclipse (GROUSE) project. The observations were done in staring mode, while significantly defocusing the telescope to avoid saturation on the K=8.4 star. With an average cadence of 2.5 seconds, we collected 6520 frames during one night. Results: The eclipse is detected at the 4sigma level, the measured depth being 0.109+/-0.025%. The uncertainties are dominated by residual systematic effects, as estimated from different reduction/analysis procedures. The measured depth corresponds to a brightness temperature of 2136+150-170K. This brightness temperature is significantly higher than those derived from longer wavelengths, making it difficult to fit all available data points with a plausible atmospheric model. However, it may be that we underestimate the true uncertainties of our measurements, since it is notoriously difficult to assign precise statistical significance to a result when systematic effects are important.