• The interaction of plasma with magnetic field in the partially ionised solar atmosphere is frequently modelled via a single-fluid approximation, which is valid for the case of a strongly coupled collisional media, such as solar photosphere and low chromosphere. Under the single-fluid formalism the main non-ideal effects are described by a series of extra terms in the generalised induction equation and in the energy conservation equation. These effects are: Ohmic diffusion, ambipolar diffusion, the Hall effect, and the Biermann battery effect. From the point of view of the numerical solution of the single-fluid equations, when ambipolar diffusion or Hall effects dominate can introduce severe restrictions on the integration time step and can compromise the stability of the numerical scheme. In this paper we introduce two numerical schemes to overcome those limitations. The first of them is known as Super Time-Stepping (STS) and it is designed to overcome the limitations imposed when the ambipolar diffusion term is dominant. The second scheme is called the Hall Diffusion Scheme (HDS) and it is used when the Hall term becomes dominant. These two numerical techniques can be used together by applying Strang operator splitting. This paper describes the implementation of the STS and HDS schemes in the single-fluid code Mancha3D. The validation for each of these schemes is provided by comparing the analytical solution with the numerical one for a suite of numerical tests.
  • We investigate the properties of a sunspot light-bridge, focusing on the changes produced by the impact of a plasma blob ejected from a C-class flare. We observed a sunspot in active region NOAA 12544 using spectropolarimetric raster maps of the four Fe I lines around 15655 \AA\ with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS), narrow-band intensity images sampling the Fe I 6173 \AA\ line with the GREGOR Fabry-P\'erot Interferometer (GFPI), and intensity broad band images in G-band and Ca II H band with the High-resolution Fast Imager (HiFI). All these instruments are located at the GREGOR telescope at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The data cover the time before, during, and after the flare event. The analysis is complemented with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The physical parameters of the atmosphere at differents heights were inferred using spectral-line inversion techniques. We identify photospheric and chromospheric brightenings, heating events, and changes in the Stokes profiles associated to the flare eruption and the subsequent arrival of the plasma blob to the light bridge, after traveling along an active region loop. The measurements suggest that these phenomena are the result of reconnection events driven by the interaction of the plasma blob with the magnetic field topology of the light bridge.
  • The magnetic fields of the quiet Sun cover at any time more than 90\% of its surface and their magnetic energy budget is crucial to explain the thermal structure of the solar atmosphere. One of the possible origins of these fields is due to the action of local dynamo in the upper convection zone of the Sun. Existing simulations of the local solar dynamo require an initial seed field, and sufficiently high spatial resolution, in order to achieve the amplification of the seed field to the observed values in the quiet Sun. Here we report an alternative model of seeding based on the action of the Bierman battery effect. This effect generates a magnetic field due to the local imbalances in electron pressure in the partially ionized solar plasma. We show that the battery effect self-consistently creates from zero an initial seed field of a strength of the order of micro G, and together with dynamo amplification, allows the generation of quiet Sun magnetic fields of a similar strength to those from solar observations.
  • This work aims to understand the behavior of non-linear waves in the vicinity of a coronal null point. In previous works we have showed that high frequency waves are generated in such magnetic configuration. This paper studies those waves in detail in order to provide a plausible explanation of their generation. We demonstrate that slow magneto-acoustic shock waves generated in the chromosphere propagate through the null point and produce a train of secondary shocks that escape along the field lines. A particular combination of the shock wave speeds generates waves at a frequency of 80 mHz. We speculate that this frequency may be sensitive to the atmospheric parameters in the corona and therefore can be used to probe the structure of this solar layer.
  • Photospheric waves in sunspots moving radially outwards at speeds faster than the characteristic wave velocities have been recently detected. It has been suggested that they are the visual pattern of $p-$modes excited around 5 Mm beneath the sunspot. Using numerical simulations, we have performed a parametric study of the waves observed at the photosphere and higher layers produced by sources located at different depths. The observational measurements are consistent with waves driven between approximately 1 Mm and 5 Mm below the sunspot surface.
  • Active regions are the most prominent manifestations of solar magnetic fields; their generation and dissipation are fundamental problems in solar physics. Light bridges are commonly present during sunspot decay, but a comprehensive picture of their role in the removal of photospheric magnetic field is still missing. We study the three dimensional configuration of a sunspot and in particular its light bridge during one of the last stages of its decay. We present the magnetic and thermodynamical stratification inferred from full Stokes inversions of the photospheric Si I 10827 \AA\ and Ca I 10839 \AA\ lines obtained with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph of the GREGOR telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The analysis is complemented by a study of continuum images covering the disk passage of the active region, which are provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The sunspot shows a light bridge with penumbral continuum intensity that separates the central umbra from a smaller umbra. We find that in this region the magnetic field lines form a canopy with lower magnetic field strength in the inner part. The photospheric light bridge is dominated by gas pressure (high-$\beta$), as opposed to the surrounding umbra where the magnetic pressure is higher. A convective flow is observed in the light bridge. This flow is able to bend the magnetic field lines and to produce field reversals. The field lines close above the light bridge and become as vertical and strong as in the surrounding umbra. We conclude that it develops because of two highly magnetized regions which come closer during the sunspot evolution.
  • This paper studies the dependence of the CaIIH line core brightness on the strength and inclination of photospheric magnetic field, and on the parameters of convective and wave motions in a facular region at the solar disc center. We use three simultaneous datasets obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife): (1) spectra of BaII 4554 A line registered with the instrument TESOS to measure the variations of intensity and velocity through the photosphere up to the temperature minimum; (2) spectropolarimetric data in FeI 1.56 $\mu$m lines (registered with the instrument TIP II) to measure photospheric magnetic fields; (3) filtergrams in CaIIH that give information about brightness fluctuations in the chromosphere. The results show that the CaIIH brightness in the facula strongly depends on the power of waves with periods in the 5-min range, that propagate upwards, and also on the phase shift between velocity oscillations at the bottom photosphere and around the temperature minimum height, measured from BaII line. The CaIIH brightness is maximum at locations where the phase shift between temperature and velocity oscillations lies within 0-100 degrees. There is an indirect influence of convective motions on the CaIIH brightness. Namely, the higher is the amplitude of convective velocities and the larger is the height where they change their direction of motion, the brighter is the facula. Altogether, our results lead to conclusions that facular regions appear bright not only because of the Wilson depression in magnetic structures, but also due to real heating.
  • In this paper, we show a "proof of concept" of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm's law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.
  • Large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations (LALOs) in prominences are spectacular manifestations of the solar activity. In such events nearby energetic disturbances induce periodic motions on filaments with displacements comparable to the size of the filaments themselves and with velocities larger than 20 km/s. The pendulum model, in which the gravity projected along a rigid magnetic field is the restoring force, was proposed to explain these events. However, it can be objected that in a realistic situation where the magnetic field reacts to the mass motion of the heavy prominence, the simplified pendulum model could be no longer valid. We have performed non-linear time-dependent numerical simulations of LALOs considering a dipped magnetic field line structure. In this work we demonstrate that for even relatively weak magnetic fields the pendulum model works very well. We therefore validate the pendulum model and show its robustness, with important implications for prominence seismology purposes. With this model it is possible to infer the geometry of the dipped field lines that support the prominence.
  • The amplitudes of the Evershed flow are measured using pairs of carefully selected FeI and FeII spectral lines located close in wavelength and registered simultaneously. A sunspot belonging to the NOAA 11582 group was scanned using the spectrograph of the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife). Velocities were extracted from intensity profiles using the lambda-meter technique. The formation heights of the observed spectral lines were calculated using semi-empirical models of a bright and dark penumbral filament taking into account the sunspot location at the limb. Our objective is to compare azimuthally averaged amplitudes of the Evershed flow extracted from neutral and ion lines. We find measurable differences in the radial component of the flow. All five pairs of lines show the same tendency, with a few hundred m/s larger amplitude of the flow measured from FeI lines compared to FeII lines. This tendency is preserved at all photospheric heights and radial distances in the penumbra. We discuss the possible origin of this effect.
  • Coronal waves are an important aspect of the dynamics of the plasma in the corona. Wavefront dislocations are topological features of most waves in nature and also of magnetohydrodynamic waves. Are there dislocations in coronal waves? The finding and explanation of dislocations may shed light on the nature and characteristics of the propagating waves, their interaction in the corona and in general on the plasma dynamics. We positively identify dislocations in coronal waves observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) as singularities in the Doppler shifts of emission coronal lines. We study the possible singularities that can be expected in coronal waves and try to reproduce the observed dislocations in terms of localization and frequency of appearance. The observed dislocations can only be explained by the interference of a kink and a sausage wave modes propagating with different frequencies along the coronal magnetic field. In the plane transverse to the propagation, the cross-section of the oscillating plasma must be smaller than the spatial resolution, and the two waves result in net longitudinal and transverse velocity components that are mixed through projection onto the line of sight. Alfv\'en waves can be responsible of the kink mode, but a magnetoacoustic sausage mode is necessary in all cases. Higher (flute) modes are excluded. The kink mode has a pressure amplitude that is smaller than the pressure amplitude of the sausage mode, though its observed velocity is larger. This concentrates dislocations on the top of the loop. To explain dislocations, any model of coronal waves must include the simultaneous propagation and interference of kink and sausage wave modes of comparable but different frequencies, with a sausage wave amplitude much smaller than the kink one.
  • Spectropolarimetric temporal series from Fe I $\lambda$ 6301.5 \AA\ and Ca II infrared triplet lines are obtained by applying the Stokes synthesis code NICOLE to a numerical simulation of wave propagation in a sunspot umbra from MANCHA code. The analysis of the phase difference between Doppler velocity and intensity core oscillations of the Fe I $\lambda$ 6301.5 \AA\ line reveals that variations in the intensity are produced by opacity fluctuations rather than intrinsic temperature oscillations, except for frequencies between 5 and 6.5 mHz. On the other hand, the photospheric magnetic field retrieved from the weak field approximation provides the intrinsic magnetic field oscillations associated to wave propagation. Our results suggest that this is due to the low magnetic field gradient of our sunspot model. The Stokes parameters of the chromospheric Ca II infrared triplet lines show striking variations as shock waves travel through the formation height of the lines, including emission self-reversals in the line core and highly abnormal Stokes V profiles. Magnetic field oscillations inferred from the Ca II infrared lines using the weak field approximation appear to be related with the magnetic field strength variation between the photosphere and the chromosphere.
  • We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at a prominence-corona transition region in a non-linear regime. Our aim is to understand how the presence of neutral atoms in the prominence plasma influences the instability growth rate, and the evolution of velocity, magnetic field vector and thermodynamic parameters of turbulent drops. We perform 2.5D numerical simulations of the instability initiated by a multi-mode perturbation at the corona-prominence interface using a single-fluid MHD approach including a generalized Ohm's law. The initial equilibrium configuration is purely hydrostatic and contains a homogeneous horizontal magnetic field forming an angle with the direction in which the plasma is perturbed. We analyze simulations with two different orientations of the magnetic field. For each field orientation we compare two simulations, one for the pure MHD case, and one including the ambipolar diffusion in the Ohm's law (AD case). Other than that, both simulations for each field orientation are identical. The numerical results in the initial stage of the instability are compared with the analytical linear calculations. We find that the configuration is always unstable in the AD case. The growth rate of the small-scale modes in the non-linear regime is up to 50% larger in the AD case than in the purely MHD case and the average velocities of flows are a few percent larger. Significant drift momenta are found at the interface between the coronal and the prominence material at all stages of the instability, produced by the faster downward motion of the neutral component with respect to the ionized component. The differences in temperature of the bubbles between the ideal and non-ideal case are also significant, reaching 30%. There is an asymmetry between large rising bubbles and small-scale down flowing fingers, favoring the detection of upward velocities in observations.
  • We study the modification of the classical criterion for the linear onset and growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a partially ionized (PI) plasma in the one-fluid description, considering a generalized induction equation. The governing linear equations and appropriate boundary conditions, including gravitational terms, are derived and applied to the case of the RTI in a single interface between two partially ionized plasmas. The boundary conditions lead to an equation for the frequencies in which some of them have positive complex parts, marking the appearance of the RTI. We study the ambipolar term alone first, extending the result to the full induction equation later. We find that the configuration is always unstable because of the presence of a neutral species. In the classical stability regime the growth rate is small, since the collisions prevent the neutral fluid to fully develop the RTI. For parameters in the classical instability regime the growth rate is lowered, but for the considered theoretical values of the collision frequencies and diffusion coefficients for solar prominences the differences with the compressible MHD case are small. We conclude that PI modifies some aspects of the linear RTI instability, since it takes into account that neutrals do not feel the stabilizing effect of the magnetic field. For the set of parameters representative for solar prominences, our model gives the resulting timescale comparable with observed lifetimes of RTI plumes.
  • We study Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at the coronal-prominence boundary by means of 2.5D numerical simulations in a single-fluid MHD approach including a generalized Ohm's law. The initial configuration includes a homogeneous magnetic field forming an angle with the direction in which the plasma is perturbed. For each field inclination we compare two simulations, one for the pure MHD case, and one including the ambipolar diffusion in the Ohm's law, otherwise identical. We find that the configuration containing neutral atoms is always unstable. The growth rate of the small-scale modes in the non-linear regime is larger than in the purely MHD case.
  • We describe the presence of wavefront dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in stratified stellar atmospheres. Scalar dislocations such as edges and vortices can appear in Alfv\'en waves, as well as in general magneto-acoustic waves. We detect those dislocations in observations of magnetohydrodynamic waves in sunspots in the solar chromosphere. Through the measured charge of all the dislocations observed, we can give for the first time estimates of the modal contribution in the waves propagating along magnetic fields in solar sunspots.
  • We investigate the impact on Fe abundance determination of including magnetic flux in series of 3D radiation-MHD simulations of solar convection which we used to synthesize spectral intensity profiles corresponding to disc centre. A differential approach is used to quantify the changes in theoretical equivalent width of a set of 28 iron spectral lines spanning a wide range in lambda, excitation potential, oscillator strength, Land\'e factor, and formation height. The lines were computed in LTE using the spectral synthesis code LILIA. We used input magnetoconvection snapshots covering 50 minutes of solar evolution and belonging to series having an average vertical magnetic flux density of 0, 50, 100 and 200 G. For the relevant calculations we used the Copenhagen Stagger code. The presence of magnetic fields causes both a direct (Zeeman-broadening) effect on spectral lines with non-zero Land\'e factor and an indirect effect on temperature-sensitive lines via a change in the photospheric T-tau stratification. The corresponding correction in the estimated atomic abundance ranges from a few hundredths of a dex up to |Delta log(Fe)| ~ 0.15 dex, depending on the spectral line and on the amount of average magnetic flux within the range of values we considered. The Zeeman-broadening effect gains relatively more importance in the IR. The largest modification to previous solar abundance determinations based on visible spectral lines is instead due to the indirect effect, i.e., the line-weakening caused by a warmer stratification on an optical depth scale. Our results indicate that the average solar iron abundance obtained when using magnetoconvection models can be 0.03-0.11 dex higher than when using the simpler HD convection approach. We demonstrate that accounting for magnetic flux is important in state-of-the-art solar photospheric abundance determinations based on 3D simulations.
  • In this paper, we study the properties of solar granulation in a facular region from the photosphere up to the lower chromosphere. Our aim is to investigate the dependence of granular structure on magnetic field strength. We use observations obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife) using two different instruments: Triple Etalon SOlar Spectrometer (TESOS), in the BaII 4554 A line to measure velocity and intensity variations along the photosphere; and, simultaneously, Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP-II), in the FeI 1.56 $\mu$m lines to the measure Stokes parameters and the magnetic field strength at the lower photosphere. We obtain that the convective velocities of granules in the facular area decrease with magnetic field while the convective velocities of intergranular lanes increase with the field strength. Similar to the quiet areas, there is a contrast and velocity sign reversal taking place in the middle photosphere. The reversal heights depend on the magnetic field strength and are, on average, about 100 km higher than in the quiet regions. The correlation between convective velocity and intensity decreases with magnetic field at the bottom photosphere, but increases in the upper photosphere. The contrast of intergranular lanes observed close to the disc center is almost independent of the magnetic field strength. The strong magnetic field of facular area seems to stabilize the convection and to promote more effective energy transfer in the upper layers of the solar atmosphere, since the convective elements reach larger heights.
  • Full Stokes filter-polarimeters are key instruments for investigating the rapid evolution of magnetic structures on the solar surface. To this end, the image quality is routinely improved using a-posteriori image reconstruction methods. We analyze the robustness of circular polarization asymmetries to phase-diversity image reconstruction techniques. We use snapshots of magneto-hydrodynamical simulations carried out with different initial conditions to synthesize spectra of the magnetically sensitive Fe I line at 5250.2 A. We degrade the synthetic profiles spatially and spectrally to simulate observations with the IMaX full Stokes filter-polarimeter. We also simulate the focused/defocused pairs of images used by the phase-diversity algorithm for reconstruction and the polarimetric modulation scheme. We assume that standard optimization methods are able to infer the projection of the wavefront on the Zernike polynomials with 10% precision. We also consider the less favorable case of 25% precision. We obtain reconstructed monochromatic modulated images that are later demodulated and compared with the original maps. Although asymmetries are often difficult to define in the quiet Sun due to the complexity of the Stokes V profiles, we show how asymmetries are degraded with spatial and spectral smearing. The results indicate that, although image reconstruction techniques reduce the spatial smearing, they can modify the asymmetries of the profiles, mainly caused by the appearance of spatially-correlated noise.
  • We aim at reproducing the height dependence of sunspot wave signatures obtained from spectropolarimetric observations through 3D MHD numerical simulations. A magneto-static sunspot model based on the properties of the observed sunspot is constructed and perturbed at the photosphere introducing the fluctuations measured with the \SiI\ $\lambda$ 10827 \AA\ line. The results of the simulations are compared with the oscillations observed simultaneously at different heights from the \HeI\ $\lambda$ 10830 \AA\ line, the \CaIIH\ core and the \FeI\ blends in the wings of the \CaIIH\ line. The simulations show a remarkable agreement with the observations. They reproduce the velocity maps and power spectra at the formation heights of the observed lines, as well as the phase and amplification spectra between several pair of lines. We find that the stronger shocks at the chromosphere are accompanied with a delay between the observed signal and the simulated one at the corresponding height, indicating that shocks shift the formation height of the chromospheric lines to higher layers. Since the simulated wave propagation matches very well the properties of the observed one, we are able to use the numerical calculations to quantify the energy contribution of the magneto-acoustic waves to the chromospheric heating in sunspots. Our findings indicate that the energy supplied by these waves is too low to balance the chromospheric radiative losses. The energy contained at the formation height of the lowermost \SiI\ $\lambda$ 10827 \AA\ line in the form of slow magneto-acoustic waves is already insufficient to heat the higher layers, and the acoustic energy which reaches the chromosphere is around 3-9 times lower than the required amount of energy. The contribution of the magnetic energy is even lower.
  • We present observational evidence for oscillations of magnetic flux density in the quiet areas of the Sun. The majority of magnetic fields on the solar surface have strengths of the order of or lower than the equipartition field (300-500 G). This results in a myriad of magnetic fields whose evolution is largely determined by the turbulent plasma motions. When granules evolve they squash the magnetic field lines together or pull them apart. Here we report on the periodic deformation of the shapes of features in circular polarization observed at high resolution with Sunrise. In particular, we note that the area of patches with constant magnetic flux oscillates with time, which implies that the apparent magnetic field intensity oscillates in antiphase. The periods associated to this oscillatory pattern is compatible with the granular life-time and change abruptly, which suggests that these oscillations might not correspond to characteristic oscillatory modes of magnetic structures, but to the forcing by granular motions. In one particular case, we find three patches around the same granule oscillating in phase, which means that the spatial coherence of these oscillations can reach 1600 km. Interestingly, the same kind of oscillatory phenomenon is found also in the upper photosphere.
  • We explore the effect of the magnetic field when using realistic three-dimensional convection experiments to determine solar element abundances. By carrying out magnetoconvection simulations with a radiation-hydro code (the Copenhagen stagger code) and through a-posteriori spectral synthesis of three Fe I lines, we obtain evidence that moderate amounts of mean magnetic flux cause a noticeable change in the derived equivalent widths compared with those for a non-magnetic case. The corresponding Fe abundance correction for a mean flux density of 200 G reaches up to ~0.1 dex in magnitude. These results are based on space- and time-averaged line profiles over a time span of 2.5 solar hours in the statistically stationary regime of the convection. The main factors causing the change in equivalent widths, namely the Zeeman broadening and the modification of the temperature stratification, act in different amounts and, for the iron lines considered here, in opposite directions; yet, the resulting $|\Delta\log\epsilon_{\odot}(Fe)|$ coincides within a factor two in all of them, even though the sign of the total abundance correction is different for the visible and infrared lines. We conclude that magnetic effects should be taken into account when discussing precise values of the solar and stellar abundances and that an extended study is warranted.
  • We study the propagation of waves from the photosphere to the chromosphere of sunspots. From time series of cospatial Ca II H (including its line blends) intensity spectra and polarimetric spectra of Si I 1082.7 nm and He I 1083.0 nm we retrieve the line-of-sight velocity at several heights. The analysis of the phase difference and amplification spectra shows standing waves for frequencies below 4 mHz and propagating waves for higher frequencies, and allows us to infer the temperature and height where the lines are formed. Using these observational data, we have constructed a model of sunspot, and we have introduced the velocity measured with the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm line as a driver. The numerically propagated wave pattern fits reasonably well with the observed using the lines formed at higher layers, and the simulations reproduce many of the observed features. The observed waves are slow MHD waves propagating longitudinally along field lines.
  • We analyze the propagation of waves in sunspots from the photosphere to the chromosphere using time series of co-spatial Ca II H intensity spectra (including its line blends) and polarimetric spectra of Si I 10827 and the He I 10830 multiplet. From the Doppler shifts of these lines we retrieve the variation of the velocity along the line-of-sight at several heights. Phase spectra are used to obtain the relation between the oscillatory signals. Our analysis reveals standing waves at frequencies lower than 4 mHz and a continuous propagation of waves at higher frequencies, which steepen into shocks in the chromosphere when approaching the formation height of the Ca II H core. The observed non-linearities are weaker in Ca II H than in He I lines. Our analysis suggests that the Ca II H core forms at a lower height than the He I 10830 line: a time delay of about 20 s is measured between the Doppler signal detected at both wavelengths. We fit a model of linear slow magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a stratified atmosphere with radiative losses according to Newton's cooling law to the phase spectra and derive the difference in the formation height of the spectral lines. We show that the linear model describes well the wave propagation up to the formation height of Ca II H, where non-linearities start to become very important.
  • While sunspots are easily observed at the solar surface, determining their subsurface structure is not trivial. There are two main hypotheses for the subsurface structure of sunspots: the monolithic model and the cluster model. Local helioseismology is the only means by which we can investigate subphotospheric structure. However, as current linear inversion techniques do not yet allow helioseismology to probe the internal structure with sufficient confidence to distinguish between the monolith and cluster models, the development of physically realistic sunspot models are a priority for helioseismologists. This is because they are not only important indicators of the variety of physical effects that may influence helioseismic inferences in active regions, but they also enable detailed assessments of the validity of helioseismic interpretations through numerical forward modeling. In this paper, we provide a critical review of the existing sunspot models and an overview of numerical methods employed to model wave propagation through model sunspots. We then carry out an helioseismic analysis of the sunspot in Active Region 9787 and address the serious inconsistencies uncovered by \citeauthor{gizonetal2009}~(\citeyear{gizonetal2009,gizonetal2009a}). We find that this sunspot is most probably associated with a shallow, positive wave-speed perturbation (unlike the traditional two-layer model) and that travel-time measurements are consistent with a horizontal outflow in the surrounding moat.