• We present a catalogue of ALMA flux density measurements of 754 calibrators observed between August 2012 and September 2017, for a total of 16,263 observations in different bands and epochs. The flux densities were measured reprocessing the ALMA images generated in the framework of the ALMACAL project, with a new code developed by the Italian node of the European ALMA Regional Centre. A search in the online databases yielded redshift measurements for 589 sources ($\sim$78 per cent of the total). Almost all sources are flat-spectrum, based on their low-frequency spectral index, and have properties consistent with being blazars of different types. To illustrate the properties of the sample we show the redshift and flux density distributions as well as the distributions of the number of observations of individual sources and of time spans in the source frame for sources observed in bands 3 (84$-$116 GHz) and 6 (211$-$275 GHz). As examples of the scientific investigations allowed by the catalogue we briefly discuss the variability properties of our sources in ALMA bands 3 and 6 and the frequency spectra between the effective frequencies of these bands. We find that the median variability index steadily increases with the source-frame time lag increasing from 100 to 800 days, and that the frequency spectra of BL Lacs are significantly flatter than those of flat-spectrum radio quasars. We also show the global spectral energy distributions of our sources over 17 orders of magnitude in frequency.
  • We present the results from a $\sim500$ ks Chandra observation of the $z=6.31$ QSO SDSS J1030+0524. This is the deepest X-ray observation to date of a $z\sim6$ QSO. The QSO is detected with a total of 125 net counts in the full ($0.5-7$ keV) band and its spectrum can be modeled by a single power-law model with photon index of $\Gamma = 1.81 \pm 0.18$ and full band flux of $f=3.95\times 10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. When compared with the data obtained by XMM-Newton in 2003, our Chandra observation in 2017 shows a harder ($\Delta \Gamma \approx -0.6$) spectrum and a 2.5 times fainter flux. Such a variation, in a timespan of $\sim2$ yrs rest-frame, is unexpected for such a luminous QSO powered by a $> 10^9 \: M_{\odot}$ black hole. The observed source hardening and weakening could be related to an intrinsic variation in the accretion rate. However, the limited photon statistics does not allow us to discriminate between an intrinsic luminosity and spectral change, and an absorption event produced by an intervening gas cloud along the line of sight. We also report the discovery of diffuse X-ray emission that extends for 30"x20" southward the QSO with a signal-to-noise ratio of $\sim$6, hardness ratio of $HR=0.03_{-0.25}^{+0.20}$, and soft band flux of $f_{0.5-2 \: keV}= 1.1_{-0.3}^{+0.3} \times 10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, that is not associated to a group or cluster of galaxies. We discuss two possible explanations for the extended emission, which may be either associated with the radio lobe of a nearby, foreground radio galaxy (at $z \approx 1-2$), or ascribed to the feedback from the QSO itself acting on its surrounding environment, as proposed by simulations of early black hole formation.
  • We present high sensitivity polarimetric observations in 6 bands covering the 5.5-38 GHz range of a complete sample of 53 compact extragalactic radio sources brighter than 200 mJy at 20 GHz. The observations, carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), achieved a 91% detection rate (at 5 sigma). Within this frequency range the spectra of about 95% of sources are well fitted by double power laws, both in total intensity and in polarisation, but the spectral shapes are generally different in the two cases. Most sources were classified as either steep- or peaked-spectrum but less than 50% have the same classification in total and in polarised intensity. No significant trends of the polarisation degree with flux density or with frequency were found. The mean variability index in total intensity of steep-spectrum sources increases with frequency for a 4-5 year lag, while no significant trend shows up for the other sources and for the 8 year lag. In polarisation, the variability index, that could be computed only for the 8 year lag, is substantially higher than in total intensity and has no significant frequency dependence.
  • We present near-IR images of five luminous quasars at z~2 and one at z~4 obtained with an experimental adaptive optics instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The observations are part of a program aimed at demonstrating the capabilities of multi-conjugated adaptive optics imaging combined with the use of natural guide stars for high spatial resolution studies on large telescopes. The observations were mostly obtained under poor seeing conditions but in two cases. In spite of these non optimal conditions, the resulting images of point sources have cores of FWHM ~0.2 arcsec. We are able to characterize the host galaxy properties for 2 sources and set stringent upper limits to the galaxy luminosity for the others. We also report on the expected capabilities for investigating the host galaxies of distant quasars with adaptive optics systems coupled with future Extremely Large Telescopes. Detailed simulations show that it will be possible to characterize compact (2-3 kpc) quasar host galaxies for QSOs at z = 2 with nucleus K-magnitude spanning from 15 to 20 (corresponding to absolute magnitude -31 to -26) and host galaxies that are 4 mag fainter than their nuclei.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations from the 2014 Long Baseline Campaign in dust continuum and spectral line emission from the HL Tau region. The continuum images at wavelengths of 2.9, 1.3, and 0.87 mm have unprecedented angular resolutions of 0.075 arcseconds (10 AU) to 0.025 arcseconds (3.5 AU), revealing an astonishing level of detail in the circumstellar disk surrounding the young solar analogue HL Tau, with a pattern of bright and dark rings observed at all wavelengths. By fitting ellipses to the most distinct rings, we measure precise values for the disk inclination (46.72pm0.05 degrees) and position angle (+138.02pm0.07 degrees). We obtain a high-fidelity image of the 1.0 mm spectral index ($\alpha$), which ranges from $\alpha\sim2.0$ in the optically-thick central peak and two brightest rings, increasing to 2.3-3.0 in the dark rings. The dark rings are not devoid of emission, we estimate a grain emissivity index of 0.8 for the innermost dark ring and lower for subsequent dark rings, consistent with some degree of grain growth and evolution. Additional clues that the rings arise from planet formation include an increase in their central offsets with radius and the presence of numerous orbital resonances. At a resolution of 35 AU, we resolve the molecular component of the disk in HCO+ (1-0) which exhibits a pattern over LSR velocities from 2-12 km/s consistent with Keplerian motion around a ~1.3 solar mass star, although complicated by absorption at low blue-shifted velocities. We also serendipitously detect and resolve the nearby protostars XZ Tau (A/B) and LkHa358 at 2.9 mm.
  • R.P.J. Tilanus, T.P. Krichbaum, J.A. Zensus, A. Baudry, M. Bremer, H. Falcke, G. Giovannini, R. Laing, H. J. van Langevelde, W. Vlemmings, Z. Abraham, J. Afonso, I. Agudo, A. Alberdi, J. Alcolea, D. Altamirano, S. Asadi, K. Assaf, P. Augusto, A-K. Baczko, M. Boeck, T. Boller, M. Bondi, F. Boone, G. Bourda, R. Brajsa, J. Brand, S. Britzen, V. Bujarrabal, S. Cales, C. Casadio, V. Casasola, P. Castangia, J. Cernicharo, P. Charlot, L. Chemin, Y. Clenet, F. Colomer, F. Combes, J. Cordes, M. Coriat, N. Cross, F. D'Ammando, D. Dallacasa, J-F. Desmurs, R. Eatough, A. Eckart, D. Eisenacher, S. Etoka, M. Felix, R. Fender, M. Ferreira, E. Freeland, S. Frey, C. Fromm, L. Fuhrmann, K. Gabanyi, R. Galvan-Madrid, M. Giroletti, C. Goddi, J. Gomez, E. Gourgoulhon, M. Gray, I. di Gregorio, R. Greimel, N. Grosso, J. Guirado, K. Hada, A. Hanslmeier, C. Henkel, F. Herpin, P. Hess, J. Hodgson, D. Horns, E. Humphreys, B. Hutawarakorn Kramer, V. Ilyushin, V. Impellizzeri, V. Ivanov, M. Julião, M. Kadler, E. Kerins, P. Klaassen, K. van 't Klooster, E. Kording, M. Kozlov, M. Kramer, A. Kreikenbohm, O. Kurtanidze, J. Lazio, A. Leite, M. Leitzinger, J. Lepine, S. Levshakov, R. Lico, M. Lindqvist, E. Liuzzo, A. Lobanov, P. Lucas, K. Mannheim, J. Marcaide, S. Markoff, I. Martí-Vidal, C. Martins, N. Masetti, M. Massardi, K. Menten, H. Messias, S. Migliari, A. Mignano, J. Miller-Jones, D. Minniti, P. Molaro, S. Molina, A. Monteiro, L. Moscadelli, C. Mueller, A. Müller, S. Muller, F. Niederhofer, P. Odert, H. Olofsson, M. Orienti, R. Paladino, F. Panessa, Z. Paragi, T. Paumard, P. Pedrosa, M. Pérez-Torres, G. Perrin, M. Perucho, D. Porquet, I. Prandoni, S. Ransom, D. Reimers, M. Rejkuba, L. Rezzolla, A. Richards, E. Ros, A. Roy, A. Rushton, T. Savolainen, R. Schulz, M. Silva, G. Sivakoff, R. Soria-Ruiz, R. Soria, M. Spaans, R. Spencer, B. Stappers, G. Surcis, A. Tarchi, M. Temmer, M. Thompson, J. Torrelles, J. Truestedt, V. Tudose, T. Venturi, J. Verbiest, J. Vieira, P. Vielzeuf, F. Vincent, N. Wex, K. Wiik, T. Wiklind, J. Wilms, E. Zackrisson, H. Zechlin
    July 1, 2014 astro-ph.IM
    Very long baseline interferometry at millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths (mmVLBI) offers the highest achievable spatial resolution at any wavelength in astronomy. The anticipated inclusion of ALMA as a phased array into a global VLBI network will bring unprecedented sensitivity and a transformational leap in capabilities for mmVLBI. Building on years of pioneering efforts in the US and Europe the ongoing ALMA Phasing Project (APP), a US-led international collaboration with MPIfR-led European contributions, is expected to deliver a beamformer and VLBI capability to ALMA by the end of 2014 (APP: Fish et al. 2013, arXiv:1309.3519). This report focuses on the future use of mmVLBI by the international users community from a European viewpoint. Firstly, it highlights the intense science interest in Europe in future mmVLBI observations as compiled from the responses to a general call to the European community for future research projects. A wide range of research is presented that includes, amongst others: - Imaging the event horizon of the black hole at the centre of the Galaxy - Testing the theory of General Relativity an/or searching for alternative theories - Studying the origin of AGN jets and jet formation - Cosmological evolution of galaxies and BHs, AGN feedback - Masers in the Milky Way (in stars and star-forming regions) - Extragalactic emission lines and astro-chemistry - Redshifted absorption lines in distant galaxies and study of the ISM and circumnuclear gas - Pulsars, neutron stars, X-ray binaries - Testing cosmology - Testing fundamental physical constants
  • Context. The advent of Fermi is changing our understanding on the radio and gamma-ray emission in Active Galactic Nuclei. Contrary to pre-Fermi ideas, BL Lac objects are found to be the most abundant emitters in the gamma-ray band. However, since they are relatively weak radio sources, most of their parsec-scale structure and their multi-frequency properties are poorly understood and/or have not been investigated in a systematically fashion. Aims. Our main goal is to analyze the radio and gamma-ray emission properties of a sample of 42 BL Lacs selected, for the first time in the literature, with no constraint on their radio and gamma-ray flux densities/emission. Methods. Thanks to new Very Long Baseline Array observations at 8 and 15 GHz for the whole sample, we present here fundamental parameters such as radio flux densities, spectral index information, and parsec-scale structure. Moreover, we search for gamma-ray counterparts using data reported in the Second Catalog of Fermi Gamma-ray sources. Results. Parsec-scale radio emission is observed in the majority of the sources at both frequencies. Gamma-ray counterparts are found for 14/42 sources. Conclusions. The comparison between our results in radio and gamma-ray bands points out the presence of a large number of faint BL Lacs showing "non classical" properties such as low source compactness, core dominance, no gamma-ray emission and steep radio spectral indexes. A deeper multiwavelength analysis will be needed.
  • The radio source at the center of the cool core galaxy cluster RBS 797 (z=0.35) is known to exhibit a misalignment of its radio jets and lobes observed at different VLA-scale, with the innermost kpc-scale jets being almost orthogonal to the radio emission which extends for tens of kpc filling the X-ray cavities. Gitti et al. suggested that this peculiar radio morphology may indicate a recurrent activity of the central radio source, where the jet orientation is changing between the different outbursts due to the effects of supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs). We aim at unveiling the nuclear radio properties of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in RBS 797 and at investigating the presence of a SMBBH system in its center. We have performed new high-resolution observations at 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN), reaching an angular resolution of 9x5 mas^2 and a sensitivity of 36 microJy/beam. We report the EVN detection of two compact components in the BCG of RBS 797, with a projected separation of ~77 pc. We can envisage two possible scenarios: the two components are two different nuclei in a close binary system, or they are the core and a knot of its jet. Both interpretations are consistent with the presence of SMBBHs. Our re-analysis of VLA archival data seems to favor the first scenario, as we detect two pairs of radio jets misaligned by ~90 degrees on the same kpc scale emanating from the central radio core. If the two outbursts are almost contemporaneous, this is clear evidence of the presence of two active SMBHs, whose radio nuclei are unresolved at VLA resolution. The nature of the double source detected by our EVN observations in the BCG of RBS 797 can be established only by future sensitive, multi-frequency VLBI observations. If confirmed, RBS 797 would be the first SMBBH system observed at medium-high redshift at VLBI resolution. (abridged)
  • PKS 2155-304 is one of the brightest BL Lac object in the sky and a very well studied target from radio to TeV bands. We report on high-resolution (~ 0.12 arcsec) direct imaging of the field of PKS 2155-304 using adaptive optics near-IR observations in J and Ks bands obtained with the ESO multi-conjugate adaptive optic demonstrator (MAD) at the Very Large Telescope. These data are complemented with archival VLA images at various frequencies to investigate the properties of the close environment of the source. We characterized the faint galaxies that form the poor group associated to the target. No radio emission is present for these galaxies, while an old radio jet at ~ 20 kpc from the nucleus of PKS 2155-304 and a jet-like structure of ~ 2 kpc (~ 1 arcsec) in the eastern direction are revealed. No counterparts of these radio jets are found in the NIR or in archival Chandra observations.
  • Among radio galaxies, compact sources are a class of objects not yet well understood, and most of them cannot be included in classical populations of compact radio sources (flat spectrum AGN or compact steep spectrum sources). Our main goal is to analyze the radio and optical properties of a sample of compact sources and compare them with FRI/FRII extended radio galaxies. We selected in the Bologna Complete Sample a sub sample of Compact sources, naming it the C BCS sample. We collected new and literature sub-arcsecond resolution multi-frequency VLA images and optical data. We compared total and nuclear radio power with optical emission line measurements. The [OIII] luminosity - 408 MHz total power relation found in High and Low excitation galaxies, as well as in young (CSS) sources, holds also for the C BCSs. However, C BCSs present higher [OIII] luminosity than expected at a given total radio power, and they show the same correlation of Core Radio Galaxies, but with a higher radio power. C BCSs appear to be the high power tail of Core Radio Galaxies. For most of the C BCSs, the morphology seems to be strongly dependent to the presence of dense environments (e.g. cluster or HI-rich galaxies) and to a low age or restarted radio activity.
  • The statistical analysis of parsec scale region of radio galaxies is crucial to obtain information on the nature of their central engine. To this purpose, we defined and observed the Bologna Complete Sample (BCS) which is unbiased with respect to the orientation of the nuclear relativistic jet being selected from low-frequency samples. The BCS is a complete sample of 94 nearby (z<0.1) radio galaxies that are well studied targets with literature kiloparsec data. For all of them, we collected parsec scale information asking new VLBI (VLBA and EVN) observations. Statistical results on their properties in radio band are presented. From the estimates of the Doppler factor and viewing angles, we discuss the connection with the available gamma-ray data. Finally, we show how future observations with Fermi could reveal new important detections of some of the BCS sources.
  • To study a statistical properties of different classes of radio sources, we defined and observed the Bologna Complete Sample (BCS) which is unbiased with respect to the orientation of the nuclear relativistic jet being selected from low-frequency samples. The BCS is a complete sample of 94 nearby (z<0.1) radio galaxies that are well studied targets with literature kiloparsec data. For all of them, we collected parsec scale information asking new VLBI observations. Statistical results on their properties in radio band are presented. From the estimates of the Doppler factor and viewing angles, we discuss the connection with the available gamma-ray data. Finally, we show how future observations with Fermi could reveal new important detections of some of the BCS sources.
  • We investigate the properties of the three BL Lac objects, PKS 2201+044, 3C 371 and PKS 0521-365, that exhibit prominent optical jets. We present high resolution near-IR images of the jet of the first two, obtained with an innovative adaptive-optics system (MAD) at ESO VLT telescope. Comparison of the jet in the optical, radio, NIR and X-ray bands reveals strong similarities in the morphology. A common property of these sources is the presence of broad emission lines in their optical spectra at variance with the typical featureless spectrum of the nearby BL Lac objects. Despite some resemblances (e.g. in the radio type), significant differences (e.g. in the central black hole masses and radio structures) with radio-loud NLS1s are found.
  • Relativistic jets are a common feature of radio loud active galactic nuclei. Multifrequency observations are a unique tool to constrain their physics. We report on a detailed study of the properties of the jet of the nearby BL Lac object PKS 2201+044, one of the rare cases where the jet is detected from radio to X-rays. We use new adaptive optics near-IR observations of the source, obtained with the ESO multi-conjugated adaptive optics demonstrator (MAD) at the Very Large Telescope. These observations acquired in Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics mode are combined with images previously achieved by HST, VLA and Chandra to perform a morphological and photometric study of the jet. We find a noticeable similarity in the morphology of the jet at radio, near-IR and optical wavelengths. We construct the spectral shape of the main knot of jet that appears dominated by synchrotron radiation. On the basis of the jet morphology and the weak lines spectrum we suggest that PKS 2201+044 belongs to the class of radio sources intermediate between FRIs and FRIIs.
  • We present new VLBI observations at 5 GHz of a complete sample of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in nearby Abell Clusters (distance class <3). Combined with data from the literature, this provides parsec-scale information for 34 BCGs. Our analysis of their parsec scale radio emission and cluster X-ray properties shows a possible dichotomy between BCGs in cool core clusters and those in non cool core clusters. Among resolved sources, those in cool core clusters tend to have two-sided parsec-scale jets, while those in less relaxed clusters have predominantly one-sided parsec-scale jets. We suggest that this difference could be the result of interplay between the jets and the surrounding medium. The one-sided structure in non cool core clusters could be due to Doppler boosting effects in relativistic, intrinsically symmetric jets; two-sided morphology in cool core clusters is likely related to the presence of heavy and mildly relativistic jets slowed down on the parsec-scale. Evidence of recurrent activity are also found in BCGs in cool core clusters.
  • We present a statistical study on parsec scale properties of a sample of Brigthest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in Abell Clusters. These data show a possible difference between BCGs in cool core clusters (two-sided parsec scale jets) and in non cool core clusters (one-sided parsec scale jet). We suggest that the two-sided morphology in cool core clusters could be due to the presence of mildly relativistic jets slowed down already at mas scale as consequence of the jet interaction with a dense surrounding medium.
  • To study statistical properties of different classes of sources, it is necessary to observe a sample that is free of selection effects. To do this, we initiated a project to observe a complete sample of radio galaxies selected from the B2 Catalogue of Radio Sources and the Third Cambridge Revised Catalogue (3CR), with no selection constraint on the nuclear properties. We named this sample "the Bologna Complete Sample" (BCS). We present new VLBI observations at 5 and 1.6 GHz for 33 sources drawn from a sample not biased toward orientation. By combining these data with those in the literature, information on the parsec-scale morphology is available for a total of 76 of 94 radio sources with a range in radio power and kiloparsec-scale morphologies. The fraction of two-sided sources at milliarcsecond resolution is high (30%), compared to the fraction found in VLBI surveys selected at centimeter wavelengths, as expected from the predictions of unified models. The parsec-scale jets are generally found to be straight and to line up with the kiloparsec-scale jets. A few peculiar sources are discussed in detail.
  • The aim of the present work is to study the radio emission on the parsec scale of 4C 26.42, the Brightest cluster galaxy in Abell 1795, in the framework of radiosources in a dense cool core cluster. We present Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 1.6, 5, 8.4 and 22 GHz. We performed a spectral index and multiepoch analysis. The source appears two-sided with a well defined and symmetric Z-structure at ~5 mas from the core. The kiloparsec-scale morphology is similar to the parsec-scale structure, but reversed in P.A., with symmetric 90 deg. bends at about 2 arcsec from the nuclear region. Comparing data obtained at 3 different epochs we derive a 3$\sigma$ limit to the apparent proper motion of $\beta_a$ < 0.04. We suggest that the parsec-scale jets are sub-relativistic, in contrast with the high velocities found for most low-power radio galaxies. The origin of the unusual radio morphology remains a puzzle. We suggest that the identification of the parent galaxy with the central cD in a cooling cluster plays an important role in the properties and structure of the jets.
  • We present an update of the parsec scale properties of the Bologna Complete Sample consisting of 95 radio sources with z $<$ 0.1 from the B2 Catalog of Radio Sources and the Third Cambridge Revised Catalog (3CR). Thanks to new data obtained in phase reference mode, we have now parsec scale images for 76 sources of the sample. Most of them show a one-sided jet structure but we find a higher fraction of two-sided sources in comparison with previous flux-limited VLBI surveys. Results for two peculiar sources, 3C 293 and 3C 310, are presented and discussed in more detail.
  • We present new VLBI observations of a complete sample of Brigthest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in nearby Abell Clusters. These data show a possible difference between BCGs in cool core clusters (two-sided parsec scale jets) and in non cool core clusters (one-sided parsec scale jet). We suggest that this difference could be due to the jet interaction with the surrounding medium. More data are necessary to discuss whether parsec-scale properties of BCGs are influenced by their peculiar morphology and position at the center of rich galaxy clusters.
  • Extended X-ray structures are common in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). Here we present the first case of a Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio galaxy, 3C 305, in which the X-ray radiation appears to be associated with the optical emission line region, dominated by the [O III]5007. On the basis of a morphological study, performed using the comparison between the X-rays, the optical and the radio band, we argue that the high energy emission has a thermal nature and it is not directly linked to the radio jet and hotspots of this source. Finally, we discuss the origin of the extended X-ray structure connected with the optical emission line region following two different interpretations: as due to the interaction between matter outflows and shock-heated environment gas, or as due to gas photoionized by nuclear emission.
  • We present an update of the parsec scale properties of the Bologna Complete Sample consisting of 95 radio sources from the B2 Catalog of Radio Sources and the Third Cambridge Revised Catalog (3CR), with z < 0.1. Thanks to recent new data we have now parsec scale images for 76 sources of the sample. Most of them show a one-sided jet structure but we find a higher fraction of two-sided sources in comparison with previous flux-limited VLBI surveys. A few peculiar sources are presented and discussed in more detail.
  • We present new VLBI observations of Brightest Cluster Galaxies in eight nearby Abell clusters. These data show a possible difference between Brightest Cluster Galaxies in cool core clusters (two-sided pc scale jets) and in non cool core clusters (one-sided pc scale jets). We suggest that this difference could be due to the jet interaction with the surrounding medium. More data are necessary to discuss if pc-scale properties of Brightest Cluster Galaxies are influenced by their peculiar morphology and position in the center of rich clusters of galaxies.