• In an earlier paper (2007), we used follow-up observations of a sample of sources from the 9C survey at 15.2 GHz to derive a set of spectral-index distributions up to a frequency of 90 GHz. These were based on simultaneous measurements made at 15.2 GHz with the Ryle telescope and at 22 and 43 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We used these distributions to make empirical estimates of source counts at 22, 30, 43, 70 and 90 GHz. In a later paper (2013), we took data at 15.7 GHz from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) and data at 93.2 GHz from the Combined Array for Research in Millimetre-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and estimated the source count at 93.2 GHz. In this paper, we re-examine the data used in both papers and now believe that the VLA flux densities we measured at 43 GHz were significantly in error, being on average only about 70 per cent of their correct values. Here, we present strong evidence for this conclusion and discuss the effect on the source-count estimates made in the 2007 paper. The source-count prediction in the 2013 paper is also revised. We make comparisons with spectral-index distributions and source counts from other telescopes, in particular with a recent deep 95 GHz source count measured by the South Pole Telescope. We investigate reasons for the problem of the low VLA 43-GHz values and find a number of possible contributory factors, but none is sufficient on its own to account for such a large deficit.
  • We present deep 15.7-GHz observations made with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array in two fields previously observed as part of the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey. These observations allow the source counts to be calculated down to 0.1 mJy, a factor of five deeper than achieved by the 10C survey. The new source counts are consistent with the extrapolated fit to the 10C source count, and display no evidence for either steepening or flattening of the counts. There is thus no evidence for the emergence of a significant new population of sources (e.g. starforming) at 15.7 GHz flux densities above 0.1 mJy, the flux density level at which we expect starforming galaxies to begin to contribute. Comparisons with the de Zotti et al. model and the SKADS Simulated Sky show that they both underestimate the observed number of sources by a factor of two at this flux density level. We suggest that this is due to the flat-spectrum cores of radio galaxies contributing more significantly to the counts than predicted by the models.
  • We present observations and analysis of a sample of 123 galaxy clusters from the 2013 Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich sources with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI), a ground-based radio interferometer. AMI provides an independent measurement with higher angular resolution, 3 arcmin compared to the Planck beams of 5-10 arcmin. The AMI observations thus provide validation of the cluster detections, improved positional estimates, and a consistency check on the fitted 'size' ($\theta_{s}$) and 'flux' ($Y_{\rm tot}$) parameters in the Generalised Navarro, Frenk and White (GNFW) model. We detect 99 of the clusters. We use the AMI positional estimates to check the positional estimates and error-bars produced by the Planck algorithms PowellSnakes and MMF3. We find that $Y_{\rm tot}$ values as measured by AMI are biased downwards with respect to the Planck constraints, especially for high Planck-SNR clusters. We perform simulations to show that this can be explained by deviation from the 'universal' pressure profile shape used to model the clusters. We show that AMI data can constrain the $\alpha$ and $\beta$ parameters describing the shape of the profile in the GNFW model for individual clusters provided careful attention is paid to the degeneracies between parameters, but one requires information on a wider range of angular scales than are present in AMI data alone to correctly constrain all parameters simultaneously.
  • We present a source catalogue and first results from a deep, blind radio survey carried out at 20 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, with follow-up observations at 5.5, 9 and 18 GHz. The Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) deep pilot survey covers a total area of 5 deg^2 in the Chandra Deep Field South and in Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We estimate the survey to be 90% complete above 2.5 mJy. Of the 85 sources detected, 55% have steep spectra (alpha_{1.4}^{20} < -0.5) and 45% have flat or inverted spectra (alpha_{1.4}^{20} >= -0.5). The steep-spectrum sources tend to have single power-law spectra between 1.4 and 18 GHz, while the spectral indices of the flat- or inverted-spectrum sources tend to steepen with frequency. Among the 18 inverted-spectrum (alpha_{1.4}^{20} >= 0.0) sources, 10 have clearly defined peaks in their spectra with alpha_{1.4}^{5.5} > 0.15 and alpha_{9}^{18} < -0.15. On a 3-yr timescale, at least 10 sources varied by more than 15% at 20 GHz, showing that variability is still common at the low flux densities probed by the AT20G-deep pilot survey. We find a strong and puzzling shift in the typical spectral index of the 15-20 GHz source population when combining data from the AT20G, Ninth Cambridge and Tenth Cambridge surveys: there is a shift towards a steeper-spectrum population when going from ~1 Jy to ~5 mJy, which is followed by a shift back towards a flatter-spectrum population below ~5 mJy. The 5-GHz source-count model by Jackson & Wall (1999), which only includes contributions from FRI and FRII sources, and star-forming galaxies, does not reproduce the observed flattening of the flat-spectrum counts below ~5 mJy. It is therefore possible that another population of sources is contributing to this effect.
  • We present an interesting Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) detection in the first of the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) 'blind', degree-square fields to have been observed down to our target sensitivity of 100{\mu}Jy/beam. In follow-up deep pointed observations the SZ effect is detected with a maximum peak decrement greater than 8 \times the thermal noise. No corresponding emission is visible in the ROSAT all-sky X-ray survey and no cluster is evident in the Palomar all-sky optical survey. Compared with existing SZ images of distant clusters, the extent is large (\approx 10') and complex; our analysis favours a model containing two clusters rather than a single cluster. Our Bayesian analysis is currently limited to modelling each cluster with an ellipsoidal or spherical beta-model, which do not do justice to this decrement. Fitting an ellipsoid to the deeper candidate we find the following. (a) Assuming that the Evrard et al. (2002) approximation to Press & Schechter (1974) correctly gives the number density of clusters as a function of mass and redshift, then, in the search area, the formal Bayesian probability ratio of the AMI detection of this cluster is 7.9 \times 10^4:1; alternatively assuming Jenkins et al. (2001) as the true prior, the formal Bayesian probability ratio of detection is 2.1 \times 10^5:1. (b) The cluster mass is MT,200 = 5.5+1.2\times 10^14h-1M\odot. (c) Abandoning a physical model with num- -1.3 70 ber density prior and instead simply modelling the SZ decrement using a phenomenological {\beta}-model of temperature decrement as a function of angular distance, we find a central SZ temperature decrement of -295+36 {\mu}K - this allows for CMB primary anisotropies, receiver -15 noise and radio sources. We are unsure if the cluster system we observe is a merging system or two separate clusters.
  • In our first paper we described three regions of the 9C survey of radio sources with the Ryle telescope at 15.2 GHz, constituting a total area of 520 deg^2 to a completeness limit of approximately 25 mJy. Here we report on a series of deeper regions, amounting to an area of 115 deg^2 complete to approximately 10 mJy and of 29 deg^2 complete to approximately 5.5 mJy. We have investigated the source counts and the distributions of the 1.4 to 15.2 GHz spectral index (alpha) for these deeper samples. The whole catalogue of 643 sources is available online. Down to our lower limit of 5.5 mJy we detect no evidence for any change in the differential source count from the earlier fitted count above 25 mJy. We have matched both our new and earlier catalogues with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalogue at 1.4 GHz. For samples of sources selected at 15.2 GHz, in three flux density ranges, we detect a significant shift in the median value of alpha; samples with higher flux densities have higher proportions of sources with flat and rising spectra. We suggest that this observed shift is consistent with a model containing two distinct source populations having differently sloped source counts. Samples selected at 1.4 GHz contain significantly smaller proportions of sources with flat and rising spectra. Also, in our area complete to approximately 10 mJy, we find 5 sources between 10 to 15 mJy, amounting to 4.3 per cent of sources in this range, with no counterpart in the NVSS catalogue. These results illustrate the problems inherent in using a low frequency catalogue to characterise the source population at a much higher frequency and emphasise the value of our blind 15.2 GHz survey.
  • We present observations of the Lynds' dark nebula LDN 1111 made at microwave frequencies between 14.6 and 17.2 GHz with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). We find emission in this frequency band in excess of a thermal free--free spectrum extrapolated from data at 1.4 GHz with matched uv-coverage. This excess is > 15 sigma above the predicted emission. We fit the measured spectrum using the spinning dust model of Drain & Lazarian (1998a) and find the best fitting model parameters agree well with those derived from Scuba data for this object by Visser et al. (2001).
  • The Arcminute Microkelvin Imager is a pair of interferometer arrays operating with six frequency channels spanning 13.9-18.2 GHz, with very high sensitivity to angular scales 30''-10'. The telescope is aimed principally at Sunyaev-Zel'dovich imaging of clusters of galaxies. We discuss the design of the telescope and describe and explain its electronic and mechanical systems.
  • We present observations between 14.2 and 17.9 GHz of sixteen Galactic HII regions made with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). In conjunction with data from the literature at lower radio frequencies we investigate the possibility of a spinning dust component in the spectra of these objects. We conclude that there is no significant evidence for spinning dust towards these sources and measure an average spectral index of 0.15+/-0.07 between 1.4 and 17.9 GHz for the sample.
  • We have used multi-frequency follow-up observations of a sample of extragalactic sources from the 9C survey at 15 GHz to make deductions about the expected source population at higher radio frequencies, such as those in the lower frequency bands of the Planck Surveyor satellite. In particular, we have made empirical estimates of the source counts at 22 GHz, 30 GHz, 43 GHz and 70 GHz and compared these with both known data and current theoretical predictions. We have also made an estimate of the count at the ALMA frequency of 90 GHz, with a view to assessing the possible population of point sources available for the phase calibration of that instrument.
  • Foreground radio sources are a major contaminant for centimetre-wave cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements and the 9C survey was set up as part of the observing strategy of the CMB telescope, the Very Small Array. Prior to this survey with the Ryle Telescope at 15 GHz there was no comparable high-frequency radio survey of any extent. Our first published source count reached a limit of ~25mJy but we have now surveyed some areas more deeply, to a completenesss limit of ~5mJy. We present the results from this deeper survey.
  • We present the preliminary results of a new survey of radio sources using the Ryle telescope at 15.2 GHz. This is the highest frequency at which a survey has been done that is relevant to the issue of radio source contamination in CMB experiments. The differential source count of the 66 sources found in 63 sqdeg is 80(S/Jy)^-2 /Jy/sr from about 20 to 500 mJy. Extrapolating this to 34 GHz (where many cm-wave CMB experiments operate) gives an estimated temperature contribution from sources of 9 microK in a CMB image, with a beam corresponding to multipole l=500. A means of source subtraction is evidently necessary, otherwise the signal-to-noise ratio in CMB images will be limited to 4 or 5, becoming worse at higher resolution. We compare the population of sources observed in this new survey to that predicted by extrapolation from lower frequency surveys, finding that source fluxes, and indeed the existence of many sources, cannot be determined by extrapolation.