• Quasars are galaxies hosting accreting supermassive black holes; due to their brightness, they are unique probes of the early universe. To date, only few quasars have been reported at $z > 6.5$ ($<$800 Myr after the Big Bang). In this work, we present six additional $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars discovered using the Pan-STARRS1 survey. We use a sample of 15 $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars to perform a homogeneous and comprehensive analysis of this highest-redshift quasar population. We report four main results: (1) the majority of $z\gtrsim$6.5 quasars show large blueshifts of the broad CIV 1549\AA$\,$emission line compared to the systemic redshift of the quasars, with a median value $\sim$3$\times$ higher than a quasar sample at $z\sim$1; (2) we estimate the quasars' black hole masses (M$\rm_{BH}\sim$0.3$-$5 $\times$ 10$^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$) via modeling of the MgII 2798\AA$\,$emission line and rest-frame UV continuum; we find that quasars at high redshift accrete their material (with $\langle (L_{\mathrm{bol}}/L_{\mathrm{Edd}}) \rangle = 0.39$) at a rate comparable to a luminosity-matched sample at lower$-$redshift, albeit with significant scatter ($0.4$ dex); (3) we recover no evolution of the FeII/MgII abundance ratio with cosmic time; (4) we derive near zone sizes; together with measurements for $z\sim6$ quasars from recent work, we confirm a shallow evolution of the decreasing quasar near zone sizes with redshift. Finally, we present new millimeter observations of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m emission line and underlying dust continuum from NOEMA for four quasars, and provide new accurate redshifts and [CII]/infrared luminosities estimates. The analysis presented here shows the large range of properties of the most distant quasars.
  • Bright quasars, observed when the Universe was less than one billion years old (z>5.5), are known to host massive black holes (~10$^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$), and are thought to reside in the center of massive dark matter overdensities. In this picture, overdensities of galaxies are expected around high redshift quasars. However, observations based on the detection of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) around these quasars do not offer a clear picture: this may be due to the uncertain redshift constraints of LBGs, which are selected through broad-band filters only. To circumvent such uncertainties, we here perform a search for Lyman Alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the field of the quasar PSO J215.1512-16.0417 at z~5.73, through narrow band, deep imaging with FORS2 at the VLT. We study an area of 37 arcmin$^{2}$, i.e. ~206 comoving Mpc$^{2}$ at the redshift of the quasar. We find no evidence for an overdensity of LAEs in the quasar field with respect to blank field studies. Possible explanations for these findings include that our survey volume is too small, or that the strong ionizing radiation from the quasar hinders galaxy formation in its immediate proximity. Another possibility is that these quasars are not situated in the dense environments predicted by some simulations.
  • We investigate the properties of the circumgalactic gas in the halo of quasar host galaxies from CIV absorption line systems. Optical spectroscopy of closely aligned pairs of quasars (projected distance \leq 200 kpc) obtained at the Gran Telescopio Canarias is used to investigate the distribution of the absorbing gas for a sample of 18 quasars at z \sim 2. We found that the detected absorption systems of EW \geq 0.3Ang associated with the foreground QSO are revealed up to 200 kpc from the center of the host galaxy. The structure of the absorbing gas is rather patchy with a covering fraction of the gas that quickly decreases beyond 100 kpc. These results are in qualitative agreement with those found for the lower ionisation metal Mg II 2800 Ang.
  • PKS 2155-304 is one of the brightest extragalactic source in the X-ray and EUV bands, and is a prototype for the BL Lac class of objects. In this paper we investigate the large-scale environment of this source using new multi-object as well as long-slit spectroscopy, together with archival spectra and optical images. We find clear evidence of a modest overdensity of galaxies at z=0.11610, consistent with previous determinations of the BL Lac redshift. The galaxy group has a radial velocity dispersion of 250km/s and a virial radius of 0.22Mpc, yielding a role-of-thumb estimate of the virial mass of M(vir)~1.5x10$^{13}$Msun, i.e., one order of magnitude less than what observed in other similar objects. This result hints toward a relatively wide diversity in the environmental properties of BL Lac objects.
  • Luminous distant quasars are unique probes of the high redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) and of the growth of massive galaxies and black holes in the early universe. Absorption due to neutral Hydrogen in the IGM makes quasars beyond a redshift of z~6.5 very faint in the optical $z$-band, thus locating quasars at higher redshifts require large surveys that are sensitive above 1 micron. We report the discovery of three new z>6.5 quasars, corresponding to an age of the universe of <850 Myr, selected as z-band dropouts in the Pan-STARRS1 survey. This increases the number of known z>6.5 quasars from 4 to 7. The quasars have redshifts of z=6.50, 6.52, and 6.66, and include the brightest z-dropout quasar reported to date, PSO J036.5078+03.0498 with M_1450=-27.4. We obtained near-infrared spectroscopy for the quasars and from the MgII line we estimate that the central black holes have masses between 5x10^8 and 4x10^9 M_sun, and are accreting close to the Eddington limit (L_Bol/L_Edd=0.13-1.2). We investigate the ionized regions around the quasars and find near zone radii of R_NZ=1.5-5.2 proper Mpc, confirming the trend of decreasing near zone sizes with increasing redshift found for quasars at 5.7<z<6.4. By combining R_NZ of the PS1 quasars with those of 5.7<z<7.1 quasars in the literature, we derive a luminosity corrected redshift evolution of R_NZ,corrected=(7.2+/-0.2)-(6.1+/-0.7)x(z-6) Mpc. However, the large spread in R_NZ in the new quasars implies a wide range in quasar ages and/or a large variation in the neutral Hydrogen fraction along different lines of sight.
  • We investigate the extent and the properties of the MgII cool, low-density absorbing gas located in the halo and in the circum-galactic environment of quasars, using a sample of 31 projected quasar pairs with impact parameter pd<200kpc in the redshift range 0.5<z<1.6. In the transverse direction, we detect 18 MgII absorbers associated with the foreground quasars, while no absorption system originated by the gas surrounding the quasar itself is found along the line-of-sight. This suggests that the quasar emission induces an anisotropy in the absorbing gas distribution. Our observations indicate that the covering fraction (fc) of MgII absorption systems with rest frame equivalent width Wr(2796)>0.3Ang. ranges from fc~1.0 at pd<65kpc to fc~0.2 at pd>150kpc, and appears to be higher than for galaxies. Our findings support a scenario where the luminosity/mass of the host galaxies affect the extent and the richness of the absorbing MgII circum-galactic medium.
  • We present Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of nine BL Lac objects of unknown redshift belonging to the list of optically selected radio loud BL Lacs candidates. We explore their spectroscopic properties and the possible link with gamma ray emission. From the new observations we determine the redshift of four objects from faint emission lines or from absorption features of the host galaxy. In three cases we find narrow intervening absorptions from which a lower limit to the redshift is inferred. For the remaining two featureless sources, lower limits to the redshift are deduced from the very absence of spectral lines. A search for gamma counterpart emission shows that six out of nine are Fermi gamma-ray emitters with two new detections. Our analysis suggests that most of the BL Lac still lacking of redshift information are most probably located at high redshift.
  • We present optical spectroscopy of the nearest quasar pair listed in the 13th edition of the Veron-Cetty & Veron catalogue, i.e. the two quasars SDSS J15244+3032 and RXS J15244+3032 (redshift z~0.27, angular separation ~7 arcsec, and line-of-sight velocity difference ~1900 km/s). This system would be an optimal candidate to investigate the mutual interaction of the host galaxies with ground based optical imaging and spectroscopy. However, new optical data demonstrate that RXS J15244+3032 is indeed a star of spectral type G. This paper includes data gathered with the Asiago 1.82m telescope (Cima Ekar Observatory, Asiago, Italy).
  • We present the discovery of a triplet of quasars at z~1.51. The whole system is well accommodated within 25 arcsec (i.e., 200 kpc in projected distance). The velocity differences among the three objects (as measured through the broad MgII emission line) are less than 1000 km/s, suggesting that the quasars belong to the same physical structure. Broad band NIR images of the field do not reveal evidence of galaxies or galaxy clusters that could act as a gravitational lens, ruling out the possibility that two or all the three quasars are multiple images of a single, strongly lensed source. QQQ J1519+0627 is the second triplet of quasars known up to date. We estimate that these systems are extremely rare in terms of simple accidental superposition. The lack of strong galaxy overdensity suggests that this peculiar system is harboured in the seeds of a yet-to-be-formed massive structure. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory with the New Technology Telescope (NTT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and at the Calar Alto Observatory with the 3.5m telescope of the Centro Astron\'omico Hispano Alem\'an (CAHA).
  • We present optical spectroscopy of projected QSO pairs to investigate the MgII and the CIV absorption features imprinted on the spectrum of the background object by the gaseous halo surrounding the foreground QSO. We observed 13 projected pairs in the redshift range 0.7<z<2.2 spanning projected separations between 60 kpc and 120 kpc. In the spectra of the background QSOs, we identify MgII intervening absorption systems associated to the foreground QSOs in 7 out of 10 pairs, and 1 absorption system out of 3 is found for CIV. The distribution of the equivalent width as a function of the impact parameter shows that, unlike the case of normal galaxies, some strong absorption systems (EWr > 1 Ang) are present also beyond a projected radius of ~70 kpc. If we take into account the mass of the galaxies as an additional parameter that influence the extent of the gaseous haloes, the distribution of the absorptions connected to the QSOs is consistent to that of galaxies. In the spectra of the foreground QSOs we do not detect any MgII absorption lines originated by the gas surrounding the QSO itself, but in 2 cases these features are present for CIV. The comparison between the absorption features observed in the transverse direction and those along the line of sight allows us to comment on the distribution of the absorbing gas and on the emission properties of the QSOs. Based on observations undertaken at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) under Programmes 085.B-0210(A) and 086.B-0028(A).
  • The dynamical properties of six SDSS quasar pairs at z < 0.8 are investigated. The pairs have proper transverse separation < 500 kpc, and velocity difference along the line of sight < 500 km/s. If they are bound systems their dynamical mass can be evaluated and compared with that of host galaxies. Evidence is found of an excess of the former mass with respect to the latter. This suggests that these quasar pairs are hosted by galaxies with massive dark halos or that they reside in a group/cluster of galaxies.