• We present the results of the most sensitive and comprehensive survey yet undertaken for radio pulsars and fast transients in the Andromeda galaxy (M31) and its satellites, using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at a central frequency of 328 MHz. We used the WSRT in a special configuration called 8gr8 (eight-grate) mode, which provides a large instantaneous field-of-view, about 5 square degrees per pointing, with good sensitivity, long dwell times (up to 8 hours per pointing), and good spatial resolution (a few arc minutes) for locating sources. We have searched for both periodicities and single pulses in our data, aiming to detect bright, persistent radio pulsars and rotating radio transients (RRATs) of either Galactic or extragalactic origin. Our searches did not reveal any confirmed periodic signals or bright single bursts from (potentially) cosmological distances. However, we do report the detection of several single pulse events, some repeating at the same dispersion measure, which could potentially originate from neutron stars in M31. One in particular was seen multiple times, including a burst of six pulses in 2000 seconds, at a dispersion measure of 54.7 pc cm^-3, which potentially places the origin of this source outside of our Galaxy. Our results are compared to a range of hypothetical populations of pulsars and RRATs in M31 and allow us to constrain the luminosity function of pulsars in M31. They also show that, unless the pulsar population in M31 is much dimmer than in our Galaxy, there is no need to invoke any violation of the inverse square law of the distance for pulsar fluxes.
  • We are currently undertaking a survey to search for new pulsars and the recently found Rotating RAdio Transcients (RRATs) in the Cygnus OB complex. The survey uses the Westerbrok Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in a unique way called the 8gr8 mode, which gives it the best efficiency of any low-frequency wide-area survey. So far we have found a few new pulsars and the routines for the detection of RRATs are already implemented in the standard reduction. We expect to find a few tens of new pulsars and a similar number of RRATs. This will help us to improve our knowledge about the population and properties of the latter poorly known objects as well as provide an improved knowledge of the number of young pulsars associated with the OB complexes in the Cygnus region.