• We present a comprehensive temporal and spectral analysis of the long Swift GRB 120327A afterglow data to investigate the possible causes of the observed early time colour variations. We collected data from various instruments/telescopes in different bands (X-rays, ultra- violet, optical and near-infrared) and determined the shapes of the afterglow early-time light curves. We studied the overall temporal behaviour and the spectral energy distributions from early to late times. The ultra-violet, optical, and near-infrared light curves can be modelled with a single power-law component between 200 and 2e4 s after the burst event. The X-ray light curve shows a canonical steep-shallow-steep behaviour, typical of long gamma-ray bursts. At early times a colour variation is observed in the ultra-violet/optical bands, while at very late times a hint of a re-brightening is visible. The observed early time colour change can be explained as a variation in the intrinsic optical spectral index, rather than an evolution of the optical extinction.
  • We show the existence of two families of short GRBs, both originating from the merger of binary neutron stars (NSs): family-1 with $E_{iso}<10^{52}$ erg, leading to a massive NS as the merged core, and family-2 with $E_{iso}>10^{52}$ erg, leading to a black hole (BH). Following the identification of the prototype GRB 090227B, we present the details of a new example of family-2 short burst: GRB 140619B. From the spectral analysis of the early $\sim0.2$ s, we infer an observed temperature $kT =(324\pm33)$ keV of the $e^+e^-$-plasma at transparency (P-GRB), a theoretically derived redshift $z=2.67\pm0.37$, a total burst energy $E^{tot}_{e^+e^-}=(6.03\pm0.79)\times10^{52}$ erg, a rest-frame peak energy $E_{p,i}=4.7$ MeV, and a baryon load $B=(5.52\pm0.73)\times10^{-5}$. We also estimate the corresponding emission of gravitational waves. Two additional examples of family-2 short bursts are identified: GRB 081024B and GRB 090510, remarkable for its well determined cosmological distance. We show that marked differences exist in the nature of the afterglows of these two families of short bursts: family-2 bursts, leading to BH formation, consistently exhibit high energy emission following the P-GRB emission; family-1 bursts, leading to the formation of a massive NS, should never exhibit high energy emission. We also show that both the families fulfill an $E_{p,i}$--$E_{iso}$ relation with slope $\gamma=0.59\pm0.07$ and a normalization constant incompatible with the one for long GRBs. The observed rate of such family-2 events is $\rho_0=\left(2.1^{+2.8}_{-1.4}\right)\times10^{-4}$Gpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$.
  • We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light-curves of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) collecting data from more than 650 GRBs discovered by Swift and other facilities. The unprecedented sample size allows us to constrain the REST FRAME X-ray properties of GRBs from a statistical perspective, with particular reference to intrinsic time scales and the energetics of the different light-curve phases in a common rest-frame 0.3-30 keV energy band. Temporal variability episodes are also studied and their properties constrained. Two fundamental questions drive this effort: i) Does the X-ray emission retain any kind of "memory"of the prompt gamma-ray phase? ii) Where is the dividing line between long and short GRB X-ray properties? We show that short GRBs decay faster, are less luminous and less energetic than long GRBs in the X-rays, but are interestingly characterized by similar intrinsic absorption. We furthermore reveal the existence of a number of statistically significant relations that link the X-ray to prompt gamma-ray parameters in long GRBs; short GRBs are outliers of the majority of these 2-parameter relations. However and more importantly, we report on the existence of a universal 3-parameter scaling that links the X-ray and the gamma-ray energy to the prompt spectral peak energy of BOTH long and short GRBs: E_{X,iso}\propto E_{gamma,iso}^{1.00\pm 0.06}/E_{pk}^{0.60\pm 0.10}.
  • We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light-curves of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), with more than 650 GRBs. Two questions drive this effort: (1) Does the X-ray emission retain any kind of memory of the prompt phase? (2) Where is the dividing line between long and short GRBs? We show that short GRBs decay faster, are less luminous and less energetic than long GRBs, but are interestingly characterized by very similar intrinsic absorption. Our analysis reveal the existence of a number of relations that link the X-ray to prompt parameters in long GRBs; short GRBs are outliers of the majority of these 2-parameter relations. Here we concentrate on a 3-parameter (E_pk-Egamma,iso-E_X,iso) scaling that is shared by the GRB class as a whole (short GRBs, long GRBs and X-ray Flashes -XRFs): interpreted in terms of emission efficiency, this scaling may imply that GRBs with high $E_{\rm{pk}}$ are more efficient during their prompt emission.
  • The comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light-curves, collecting data from six years of operation, revealed the existence of a universal scaling among the isotropic energy emitted in the rest frame 10-10^4 keV energy band during the prompt emission (E_{gamma,iso}), the peak of the prompt emission energy spectrum (E_{pk}), and the X-ray energy emitted in the 0.3-10 keV observed energy band (E_{X,iso}). In this paper we show that this three-parameter correlation is robust and does not depend on our definition of E_{X,iso}. It is shared by long, short, and low-energetic GRBs, differently from the well-known E_{gamma,iso}-E_{pk} correlation. We speculate that the ultimate physical property that regulates the GRB properties is the outflow Lorentz factor.
  • We present the analysis of a large sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray light curves in the rest frame to characterise their intrinsic properties in the context of different theoretical scenarios. We determine the morphology, time scales, and energetics of 64 long GRBs observed by \emph{Swift}/XRT \emph{without} flaring activity. We furthermore provide a one-to-one comparison to the properties of GRBs \emph{with} X-ray flares. We find that the steep decay morphology and its connection with X-ray flares favour a scenario in which a central engine origin. We show that this scenario can also account for the shallow decay phase, provided that the GRB progenitor star has a self-similar structure with a constant envelope-to-core mass ratio $\sim 0.02-0.03$. However, difficulties arise for very long duration ($t_p\gtrsim10^4$ s) shallow phases. Alternatively, a spinning-down magnetar whose emitted power refreshes the forward shock can quantitatively account for the shallow decay properties. In particular we demonstrate that this model can account for the plateau luminosity vs. end time anticorrelation.
  • We present the first systematic study of X-ray flare candidates in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) exploiting the large 6-year Swift database with the aim to constrain the physical nature of such fluctuations. We find that flare candidates appear in different types of SGRB host galaxy environments and show no clear correlation with the X-ray afterglow lifetime; flare candidates are detected both in SGRBs with a bright extended emission in the soft gamma-rays and in SGRBs which do not show such component. We furthermore show that SGRB X-ray flare candidates only partially share the set of observational properties of long GRB (LGRB) flares. In particular,the main parameter driving the duration evolution of X-ray variability episodes in both classes is found to be the elapsed time from the explosion, with very limited dependence on the different progenitors, environments, central engine life-times, prompt variability time-scales and energy budgets. On the contrary, SGRB flare candidates significantly differ from LGRB flares in terms of peak luminosity, isotropic energy, flare-to-prompt luminosity ratio and relative variability flux. However, these differences disappear when the central engine time-scales and energy budget are accounted for, suggesting that (i) flare candidates and prompt pulses in SGRBs likely have a common origin; (ii) similar dissipation and/or emission mechanisms are responsible for the prompt and flare emission in long and short GRBs, with SGRBs being less energetic albeit faster evolving versions of the long class. Finally, we show that in strict analogy to the SGRB prompt emission, flares candidates fall off the lag-luminosity relation defined by LGRBs, thus strengthening the SGRB flare-prompt pulse connection.