• Hot subdwarfs (sdO/Bs) are the helium-burning cores of red giants, which lost almost all of their hydrogen envelopes. This mass loss is often triggered by common envelope interactions with close stellar or even substellar companions. Cool companions like late-type stars or brown dwarfs are detectable via characteristic light curve variations like reflection effects and often also eclipses. To search for such objects we obtained multi-band light curves of 26 close sdO/B binary candidates from the MUCHFUSS project with the BUSCA instrument. We discovered a new eclipsing reflection effect system ($P=0.168938$~d) with a low-mass M dwarf companion ($0.116 M_{\rm \odot}$). Three more reflection effect binaries found in the course of the campaign were already published, two of them are eclipsing systems, in one system only showing the reflection effect but no eclipses the sdB primary is found to be pulsating. Amongst the targets without reflection effect a new long-period sdB pulsator was discovered and irregular light variations were found in two sdO stars. The found light variations allowed us to constrain the fraction of reflection effect binaries and the substellar companion fraction around sdB stars. The minimum fraction of reflection effect systems amongst the close sdB binaries might be greater than 15\% and the fraction of close substellar companions in sdB binaries might be as high as $8.0\%$. This would result in a close substellar companion fraction to sdB stars of about 3\%. This fraction is much higher than the fraction of brown dwarfs around possible progenitor systems, which are solar-type stars with substellar companions around 1 AU, as well as close binary white dwarfs with brown dwarf companions. This might be a hint that common envelope interactions with substellar objects are preferentially followed by a hot subdwarf phase.
  • Important tracers for the dark matter halo of the Galaxy are hypervelocity stars (HVSs), which are faster than the local escape velocity of the Galaxy and their slower counterparts, the high-velocity stars in the Galactic halo. Such HVSs are believed to be ejected from the Galactic Centre (GC) through tidal disruption of a binary by the super-massive black hole (Hills mechanism). The Hyper-MUCHFUSS survey aims at finding high-velocity potentially unbound hot subdwarf stars. We present the spectroscopic and kinematical analyses of a He-sdO as well as three candidates among the sdB stars using optical Keck/ESI and VLT (Xshooter, FORS) spectroscopy. Proper motions are determined by combining positions from early-epoch photographic plates with those derived from modern digital sky surveys. The Galactic rest frame velocities range from 203 km\,s$^{-1}$ to 660 km\,s$^{-1}$, indicating that most likely all four stars are gravitationally bound to the Galaxy. With $T_\text{eff}=47000$ K and a surface gravity of $\log g = 5.7$, SDSS J205030.39$-$061957.8 (J2050) is a spectroscopic twin of the hypervelocity He-sdO US 708. As for the latter, the GC is excluded as a place of origin based on the kinematic analysis. Hence, the Hills mechanism can be excluded for J2050. The ejection velocity is much more moderate ($385\pm79$ km\,s$^{-1}$) than that of US 708 ($998\pm68$ km\,s$^{-1}$). The binary thermonuclear supernova scenario suggested for US 708 would explain the observed properties of J2050 very well without pushing the model parameters to their extreme limits, as required for US 708. Accordingly, the star would be the surviving donor of a type Ia supernova. Three sdB stars also showed extreme kinematics; one could be a HVS ejected from the GC, whereas the other two could be ejected from the Galactic disk through the binary supernova mechanism. Alternatively, they might be extreme halo stars.
  • Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes, which can be formed by common envelope ejection. Close sdB binaries with massive white dwarf (WD) companions are potential progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae type Ia (SN~Ia). We discovered such a progenitor candidate as well as a candidate for a surviving companion star, which escapes from the Galaxy. More candidates for both types of objects have been found by crossmatching known sdB stars with proper motion and light curve catalogues. We found 72 sdO/B candidates with high Galactic restframe velocities, 12 of them might be unbound to our Galaxy. Furthermore, we discovered the second-most compact sdB+WD binary known. However, due to the low mass of the WD companion, it is unlikely to be a SN\,Ia progenitor.
  • Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes, which can be formed by common envelope ejection. Close sdB binaries with massive white dwarf (WD) companions are potential progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae type Ia (SN Ia). We discovered such a progenitor candidate as well as a candidate for a surviving companion star, which escapes from the Galaxy. More candidates for both types of objects have been found by crossmatching known sdB stars with proper motion and light curve catalogues. The Gaia mission will provide accurate astrometry and light curves of all the stars in our hot subdwarf sample and will allow us to compile a much larger all-sky catalogue of those stars. In this way we expect to find hundreds of progenitor binaries and ejected companions.
  • Hypervelocity stars (HVS) move so fast that they are unbound to the Galaxy. When they were first discovered in 2005, dynamical ejection from the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the Galactic Centre (GC) was suggested as their origin. The two dozen HVSs known today are young massive B stars, mostly of 3-4 solar masses. Recently, 20 HVS candidates of low mass were discovered in the Segue G and K dwarf sample, but none of them originates from the GC. We embarked on a kinematic analysis of the Segue HVS candidate sample using the full 6D phase space information based on new proper motion measurements. Their orbital properties can then be derived by tracing back their trajectories in different mass models of our Galaxy. We present the results for 14 candidate HVSs, for which proper motion measurements were possible. Significantly lower proper motions than found in the previous study were derived. Considering three different Galactic mass models we find that all stars are bound to the Galaxy. We confirm that the stars do not originate from the GC. The distribution of their proper motions and radial velocities is consistent with predictions for runaway stars ejected from the Galactic disk by the binary supernova mechanism. However, their kinematics are also consistent with old disk membership. Moreover, most stars have rather low metallicities and strong $\alpha$-element enrichment as typical for thick disk and halo stars, whereas the metallicity of the three most metal-rich stars could possibly indicate that they are runaway stars from the thin disk. One star shows halo kinematics.
  • Hypervelocity stars (HVS) travel with velocities so high, that they exceed the escape velocity of the Galaxy. Several acceleration mechanisms have been discussed. Only one HVS (US 708, HVS 2) is a compact helium star. Here we present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of US\,708. Travelling with a velocity of $\sim1200\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$, it is the fastest unbound star in our Galaxy. In reconstructing its trajectory, the Galactic center becomes very unlikely as an origin, which is hardly consistent with the most favored ejection mechanism for the other HVS. Furthermore, we discovered US\,708 to be a fast rotator. According to our binary evolution model it was spun-up by tidal interaction in a close binary and is likely to be the ejected donor remnant of a thermonuclear supernova.
  • The intermediate Helium subdwarf B star LS IV$-$14$^\circ$116 is a unique object showing extremely peculiar atmospheric abundances as well as long-period pulsations that cannot be explained in terms of the usual opacity mechanism. One hypothesis invoked was that a strong magnetic field may be responsible. We discredit this possibility on the basis of FORS2 spectro-polarimetry, which allows us to rule out a mean longitudinal magnetic field down to 300 G. Using the same data, we derive the atmospheric parameters for LS IV$-$14$^\circ$116 to be $T_{\rm eff}$ = 35,150$\pm$111 K, $\log{g}$ = 5.88$\pm$0.02 and $\log{N(\rm He)/N(\rm H)}$ = $-$0.62$\pm$0.01. The high surface gravity in particular is at odds with the theory that LS IV$-$14$^\circ$116 has not yet settled onto the Helium Main Sequence, and that the pulsations are excited by an $\epsilon$ mechanism acting on the Helium-burning shells present after the main Helium flash. Archival UVES spectroscopy reveals LS IV$-$14$^\circ$116 to have a radial velocity of 149.1$\pm$2.1 km/s. Running a full kinematic analysis, we find that it is on a retrograde orbit around the Galactic centre, with a Galactic radial velocity component $U$=13.23$\pm$8.28 km/s and a Galactic rotational velocity component $V$=$-$55.56$\pm$22.13 km/s. This implies that LS IV$-$14$^\circ$116 belongs to the halo population, an intriguing discovery.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims to find sdBs with compact companions like massive white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes. Here we provide classifications, atmospheric parameters and a complete radial velocity (RV) catalogue containing 1914 single measurements for an sample of 177 hot subluminous stars discovered based on SDSS DR7. 110 stars show significant RV variability, while 67 qualify as candidates. We constrain the fraction of close massive compact companions {of hydrogen-rich hot subdwarfs} in our sample to be smaller than $\sim1.3\%$, which is already close to the theoretical predictions. However, the sample might still contain such binaries with longer periods exceeding $\sim8\,{\rm d}$. We detect a mismatch between the $\Delta RV_{\rm max}$-distribution of the sdB and the more evolved sdOB and sdO stars, which challenges our understanding of their evolutionary connection. Furthermore, irregular RV variations of unknown origin with amplitudes of up to $\sim180\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$ on timescales of years, days and even hours have been detected in some He-sdO stars. They might be connected to irregular photometric variations in some cases.
  • Hot subdwarfs (sdBs) are core helium-burning stars, which lost almost their entire hydrogen envelope in the red-giant phase. Since a high fraction of those stars are in close binary systems, common envelope ejection is an important formation channel. We identified a total population of 51 close sdB+WD binaries based on time-resolved spectroscopy and multi-band photometry, derive the WD mass distribution and constrain the future evolution of these systems. Most WDs in those binaries have masses significantly below the average mass of single WDs and a high fraction of them might therefore have helium cores. We found 12 systems that will merge in less than a Hubble time and evolve to become either massive C/O WDs, AM\,CVn systems, RCrB stars or even explode as supernovae type Ia.
  • AIMS: We selected the bluest object, WISE~J0725$-$2351, from Luhman's new high proper motion (HPM) survey based on observations with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for spectroscopic follow-up observations. Our aim was to unravel the nature of this relatively bright ($V$$\sim$12, $J$$\sim$11) HPM star ($\mu$$=$267\,mas/yr). METHODS: We obtained low- and medium-resolution spectra with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) New Technology Telescope (NTT)/EFOSC2 and Very Large Telescope (VLT)/XSHOOTER instruments, investigated the radial velocity and performed a quantitative spectral analysis that allowed us to determine physical parameters. The fit of the spectral energy distribution based on the available photometry to low-metallicity model spectra and the similarity of our target to a metal-poor benchmark star (HD~84937) allowed us to estimate the distance and space velocity. RESULTS: As in the case of HD~84937, we classified WISE~J0725$-$2351 as sdF5: or a metal-poor turnoff star with $[Fe/H]$$=$$-$2.0$\pm$0.2, $T_{eff}$$=$6250$\pm$100\,K, $\log{g}$$=$4.0$\pm$0.2, and a possible age of about 12\,Gyr. At an estimated distance of more than 400\,pc, its proper motion translates to a tangential velocity of more than 500\,km/s. Together with its constant (on timescales of hours, days, and months) and large radial velocity (about $+$240\,km/s), the resulting Galactic restframe velocity is about 460\,km/s, implying a bound retrograde orbit for this extreme halo object that currently crosses the Galactic plane at high speed.
  • Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are core helium-burning stars located on the extreme horizontal branch. About half of the known sdB stars are found in close binaries. Their short orbital periods of 1.2 h to a few days suggest that they are post common-envelope systems. Eclipsing hot subdwarf binaries are rare, but important to determine the fundamental stellar parameters. Low-mass companions are identified by the reflection effect. In most cases the companion is a main sequence star near the stellar mass limit. Here we report the discovery of an eclipsing hot subdwarf binary SDSS J162256.66+473051.1 (J1622) of very short orbital period (0.0697 d), found in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. The lightcurve shows grazing eclipses and a prominent reflection effect. An analysis of the light- and radial velocity (RV) curves indicated a mass ratio of $q=$ 0.1325, an RV semiamplitude $K=47.2\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$, and an inclination of $i=72.33^\circ$. We show that a companion mass of 0.064 $M_{\rm \odot}$, well below the hydrogen-burning limit, is the most plausible solution, which implies a mass close to the canonical mass (0.47 $M_{\rm \odot}$) of the sdB star. Therefore, the companion is a brown dwarf, which not only survived the engulfment by the red-giant envelope, but also triggered its ejection, and enabled the sdB star to form. The rotation of J1622 is expected to be tidally locked to the orbit. However, J1622 rotates too slowly ($v_{\rm rot}=74.5\pm 7\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$) to be synchronized, challenging tidal interaction models.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (muchfuss) aims to discover subdwarf-B stars with massive compact companions such as overmassive white dwarfs (M > 1.0 M_sun), neutron stars or black holes. From the 127 subdwarfs with substantial radial-velocity variations discovered in the initial survey, a number of interesting objects have been selected for extensive follow-up. After an initial photometry run with BUSCA revealed that FBS 0117+396 is photometrically variable both on long and short timescales, we chose it as an auxiliary target during a 6-night multi-color photometry run with Ultracam. Spectroscopy was obtained at a number of observatories in order to determine the binary period and obtain a radial-velocity amplitude. After establishing an orbital period of P = 0.252 d, and removing the signal associated with the irradiated hemisphere of the M-dwarf companion, we were able to detect ten pulsation periods in the Fourier spectrum of the light curve. Two pulsation modes are found to have short periods of 337 and 379 s, and at least eight modes are found with periods between 45 minutes and 2.5 hours. This establishes that FBS 0117+396 is an sdB+dM reflection binary, in which the primary is a hybrid pulsator, and the first one found with this particular melange of flavours.
  • We started a new project which aims to find compact hot subdwarf binaries at low Galactic latitudes. Targets are selected from several photometric surveys and a spectroscopic follow-up campaign to find radial velocity variations on timescales as short as tens of minutes has been started. Once radial variations are detected phase-resolved spectroscopy is obtained to measure the radial velocity curve and the mass function of the system. The observing strategy is described and the discovery of two short period hot subdwarf binaries is presented. UVEXJ032855.25+503529.8 contains a hot subdwarf B star (sdB) orbited by a cool M-dwarf in a P=0.11017 days orbit. The lightcurve shows a strong reflection effect but no eclipses are visible. HS 1741+2133 is a short period (P=0.20 days) sdB most likely with a white dwarf (WD) companion.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are the most important standard candles for measuring the expansion history of the universe. The thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf can explain their observed properties, but neither the progenitor systems nor any stellar remnants have been conclusively identified. Underluminous SN Ia have been proposed to originate from a so-called double-detonation of a white dwarf. After a critical amount of helium is deposited on the surface through accretion from a close companion, the helium is ignited causing a detonation wave that triggers the explosion of the white dwarf itself. We have discovered both shallow transits and eclipses in the tight binary system CD-30 11223 composed of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf and a hot helium star, allowing us to determine its component masses and fundamental parameters. In the future the system will transfer mass from the helium star to the white dwarf. Modelling this process we find that the detonation in the accreted helium layer is sufficiently strong to trigger the explosion of the core. The helium star will then be ejected at so large a velocity that it will escape the Galaxy. The predicted properties of this remnant are an excellent match to the so-called hypervelocity star US 708, a hot, helium-rich star moving at more than 750 km/s, sufficient to leave the Galaxy. The identification of both progenitor and remnant provides a consistent picture of the formation and evolution of underluminous type Ia supernovae.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely close, eclipsing binary system. A white dwarf is orbited by a core He-burning compact hot subdwarf star with a period as short as $\simeq0.04987 {\rm d}$ making this system the most compact hot subdwarf binary discovered so far. The subdwarf will start to transfer helium-rich material on short timescales of less than $50 {\rm Myr}$. The ignition of He-burning at the surface may trigger carbon-burning in the core although the WD is less massive than the Chandrasekhar limit ($>0.74\,M_{\rm \odot}$) making this binary a possible progenitor candidate for a supernova type Ia event.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions (white dwarfs with masses $M>1.0 {\rm M_{\odot}}$, neutron stars or black holes). The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution calculations and some candidate systems have been found. We identified $\simeq1100$ hot subdwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Stars with high velocities have been reobserved and individual SDSS spectra have been analysed. About 70 radial velocity variable subdwarfs have been selected as good candidates for follow-up time resolved spectroscopy to derive orbital parameters and photometric follow-up to search for features like eclipses in the light curves. Up to now we found nine close binary sdBs with short orbital periods ranging from $\simeq0.07 {\rm d}$ to $1.5 {\rm d}$. Two of them are eclipsing binaries with companions that are most likely of substellar nature.