• The "Mouse" (PWN G359.23-0.82) is a spectacular bow shock pulsar wind nebula, powered by the radio pulsar J1747-2958. The pulsar and its nebula are presumed to have a high space velocity, but their proper motions have not been directly measured. Here we present 8.5 GHz interferometric observations of the Mouse nebula with the Very Large Array, spanning a time baseline of 12 yr. We measure eastward proper motion for PWN G359.23-0.82 (and hence indirectly for PSR J1747-2958) of 12.9+/-1.8 mas/yr, which at an assumed distance of 5 kpc corresponds to a transverse space velocity of 306+/-43 km/s. Considering pressure balance at the apex of the bow shock, we calculate an in situ hydrogen number density of approximately 1.0(-0.2)(+0.4) cm^(-3) for the interstellar medium through which the system is traveling. A lower age limit for PSR J1747-2958 of 163(-20)(+28) kyr is calculated by considering its potential birth site. The large discrepancy with the pulsar's spin-down age of 25 kyr is possibly explained by surface dipole magnetic field growth on a timescale ~15 kyr, suggesting possible future evolution of PSR J1747-2958 to a different class of neutron star. We also argue that the adjacent supernova remnant G359.1-0.5 is not physically associated with the Mouse system but is rather an unrelated object along the line of sight.
  • "The Duck" is a complicated non-thermal radio system, consisting of the energetic radio pulsar B1757-24, its surrounding pulsar wind nebula G5.27-0.90 and the adjacent supernova remnant (SNR) G5.4-1.2. PSR B1757-24 was originally claimed to be a young (~15 000 yr) and extreme velocity (>~1500 km/s) pulsar which had penetrated and emerged from the shell of the associated SNR G5.4-1.2, but recent upper limits on the pulsar's motion have raised serious difficulties with this interpretation. We here present 8.5 GHz interferometric observations of the nebula G5.27-0.90 over a 12-year baseline, doubling the time-span of previous measurements. These data correspondingly allow us to halve the previous upper limit on the nebula's westward motion to 14 milliarcseconds/yr (5-sigma), allowing a substantive reevaluation of this puzzling object. We rule out the possibility that the pulsar and SNR were formed from a common supernova explosion ~15 000 yrs ago as implied by the pulsar's characteristic age, but conclude that an old (>~70 000 yr) pulsar / SNR association, or a situation in which the pulsar and SNR are physically unrelated, are both still viable explanations.
  • We present a deep observation with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of the neutron star bow shock G189.22+2.90 in the supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443. Our data confirm the cometary morphology and central point source seen previously, but also reveal considerable new structure. Specifically, we find that the X-ray nebula consists of two distinct components: a "tongue" of bright emission close to the neutron star, enveloped by a larger, fainter "tail". We interpret the tongue and tail as delineating the termination shock and the post-shock flow, respectively, as previously identified also in the pulsar bow shock G359.23-0.82 ("the Mouse"). However, for G189.22+2.90 the tongue is much less elongated than for the Mouse, while the tail is much broader. These differences are consistent with the low Mach number, M >~ 2, expected for a neutron star moving through the hot gas in a SNR's interior, supporting the case for a physical association between G189.22+2.90 and IC 443. We resolve the stand-off distance between the star and the head of the bow shock, which allows us to estimate a space velocity for the neutron star of ~230 km/s, independent of distance. We detect thermal emission from the neutron star surface at a temperature of 102 +/- 22 eV, which is consistent with the age of SNR IC 443 for standard neutron star cooling models. We also identify two compact knots of hard emission located 1-2 arcsec north and south of the neutron star.
  • We present analytical and numerical studies of magnetorotational instabilities occuring in magnetized accretion disks. In these studies we make use of the linearised compressible MHD equations. These calculations are performed for general radially stratified disks in the cylindrical limit. In particular, we investigate the influence of nonvanishing toroidal magnetic field component on the growth rate and oscillation frequency of magnetorotational instabilities in Keplerian disks. We find the persistence of these instabilities in accretion disks close to equipartition. Our calculations show that these eigenmodes become overstable (complex eigenvalue), due to the presence of a toroidal magnetic field component, while their growth rate reduces slightly. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of magneto-rotational overstabilities in weakly magnetized sub-Keplerian rotating disks. We show that the growth rate scales with the rotation frequency of the disk. These eigenmodes also have a nonzero oscillation frequency, due to the presence of the dominant toroidal magnetic field component. The overstable character of the MRI increases as the rotation frequency of the disk decreases.
  • We present an observation with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of the unusual radio source G359.23-0.82 ("the Mouse"), along with updated radio timing data from the Parkes radio telescope on the coincident young pulsar J1747-2958. We find that G359.23-0.82 is a very luminous X-ray source (L_X [0.5-8.0 keV] = 5e34 ergs/s for a distance of 5 kpc), whose morphology consists of a bright head coincident with PSR J1747-2958, plus a 45"-long narrow tail whose power-law spectrum steepens with distance from the pulsar. We thus confirm that G359.23-0.82 is a bow-shock pulsar wind nebula powered by PSR J1747-2958; the nebular stand-off distance implies that the pulsar is moving with a Mach number of ~60, suggesting a space velocity ~600 km/s through gas of density ~0.3 cm^-3. We combine the theory of ion-dominated pulsar winds with hydrodynamic simulations of pulsar bow shocks to show that a bright elongated X-ray and radio feature extending 10'' behind the pulsar represents the surface of the wind termination shock. The X-ray and radio "trails" seen in other pulsar bow shocks may similarly represent the surface of the termination shock, rather than particles in the postshock flow as is usually argued. The tail of the Mouse contains two components: a relatively broad region seen only at radio wavelengths, and a narrow region seen in both radio and X-rays. We propose that the former represents material flowing from the wind shock ahead of the pulsar's motion, while the latter corresponds to more weakly magnetized material streaming from the backward termination shock. This study represents the first consistent attempt to apply our understanding of "Crab-like" nebulae to the growing group of bow shocks around high-velocity pulsars.
  • Observations indicate that most massive stars in the Galaxy appear in groups, called OB associations, where their strong wind activity generates large structures known as superbubbles, inside which the subsequent supernovae (SNe) explode, in tight space and time correlation. Acknowledging this fact, we investigate four main questions: 1) does the clustering of massive stars and SN explosions influence the particle acceleration process usually associated with SNe, and induce collective effects which would not manifest around isolated supernova remnants?; 2) does it make a difference for the general phenomenology of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), notably for their energy spectrum and composition?; 3) can this help alleviate some of the problems encountered within the standard GCR source model?; and 4) Is the link between superbubbles and energetic particles supported by observational data, and can it be further tested and constrained? We argue for a positive answer to all these questions. Theoretical, phenomenological and observational aspects are treated in separate papers. Here, we discuss the interaction of massive stellar winds and SN shocks inside superbubbles and indicate how this leads to specific acceleration effects. We also show that due to the high SN explosion rate and low diffusion coefficient, low-energy particles experience repeated shock acceleration inside superbubbles.
  • We present a model of a pulsar wind nebula evolving inside its associated supernova remnant. The model uses a hydrodynamics code to simulate the evolution of this system when the pulsar has a high velocity. The simulation distinguishes four different stages of pulsar wind nebula evolution: the supersonic expansion stage, the reverse shock interaction stage, the subsonic expansion stage and ultimately the bow shock stage. The simulation bears out that, due to the high velocity of the pulsar, the position of the pulsar is off-centered with respect to its pulsar wind nebula, after the passage of the reverse shock. Subsequently the pulsar wind nebula expands subsonically untill the event of the bow shock formation, when the motion of the pulsar becomes supersonic. The bow shock formation event occurs at roughly half the crossing time, when the pulsar is positioned at 0.677 times the radius of the supernova remnant blastwave, in complete agreement with analytical predictions. The crossing time is defined by the age of the supernova remnant, when the pulsar overtakes the blastwave bounding the supernova remnant. The results of the model are applied to three supernova remnants: N157B, G327.1-1.1 and W44. We argue that the head of the pulsar wind nebula, containing the active pulsar, inside the first two systems are not bounded by a bow shock. However, in the case of W44 we argue for a scenario in which the pulsar wind nebula is bounded by a bow shock, due to the supersonic motion of the pulsar.
  • Young supernova remnants are thought to be the sites where cosmic ray acceleration occurs by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. The maximum energy gained in this process is conventionally extimated to have a value close to, but distinctly below, the ``knee'' ($\sim 10^{15}$ eV) of the cosmic-ray spectrum. Bell & Lucek (2001) have suggested that the generated cosmic rays simultaneously amplify the magnetic field around the supernova remnant shock to many times its pre-shock value. In this case the acceleration rate may be significantly increased and protons can easily reach energies up to $10^{17}$ eV. We use a ``simplified'' box model incorporating the magnetic field amplification suggested by Bell & Lucek to investigate the resulting modifications of the cosmic-ray spectrum. The model predicts a spectral break at high energies, close to the ``knee'' region, and in good accordance with observations.
  • A spherically symmetric model is presented for the interaction of a pulsar wind with the associated supernova remnant. This results in a pulsar wind nebula whose evolution is coupled to the evolution of the surrounding supernova remnant. This evolution can be divided in three stages. The first stage is characterised by a supersonic expansion of the pulsar wind nebula into the freely expanding ejecta of the progenitor star. In the next stage the pulsar wind nebula is not steady; the pulsar wind nebula oscillates between contraction and expansion due to interaction with the reverse shock of the supernova remnant: reverberations which propagate forward and backward in the remnant. After the reverberations of the reverse shock have almost completely vanished and the supernova remnant has relaxed to a Sedov solution, the expansion of the pulsar wind nebula proceeds subsonically. In this paper we present results from hydrodynamical simulations of a pulsar wind nebula through all these stages in its evolution. The simulations were carried out with the Versatile Advection Code.