• One of the fundamental problems in the realm of peer-to-peer systems is that of determining their service capacities. In this paper, we focus on P2P scalability issues and propose models to compute the achievable throughput under distinct policies for selecting both peers and blocks. From these models, we obtain novel insights on the behavior of P2P swarming systems that motivate new mechanisms for publishers and peers to improve the overall performance. In particular, we obtain operational regions for swarm system. In addition, we show that system capacity significantly increases if publishers adopt the most deprived peer selection and peers reduce their service rates when they have all the file blocks but one.
  • Content distribution networks have been extremely successful in today's Internet. Despite their success, there are still a number of scalability and performance challenges that motivate clean slate solutions for content dissemination, such as content centric networking. In this paper, we address two of the fundamental problems faced by any content dissemination system: content search and content placement. We consider a multi-tiered, multi-domain hierarchical system wherein random walks are used to cope with the tradeoff between exploitation of known paths towards custodians versus opportunistic exploration of replicas in a given neighborhood. TTL-like mechanisms, referred to as reinforced counters, are used for content placement. We propose an analytical model to study the interplay between search and placement. The model yields closed form expressions for metrics of interest such as the average delay experienced by users and the load placed on custodians. Then, leveraging the model solution we pose a joint placement-search optimization problem. We show that previously proposed strategies for optimal placement, such as the square-root allocation, follow as special cases of ours, and that a bang-bang search policy is optimal if content allocation is given.
  • In this paper we study the problem of content placement in a cache network. We consider a network where routing of requests is based on random walks. Content placement is done using a novel mechanism referred to as reinforced counters. To each content we associate a counter, which is incremented every time the content is requested, and which is decremented at a fixed rate. We model and analyze this mechanism, tuning its parameters so as to achieve desired performance goals for a single cache or for a cache network. We also show that the optimal static content placement, without reinforced counters, is NP hard under different design goals.
  • In this work we propose a metric to assess academic productivity based on publication outputs. We are interested in knowing how well a research group in an area of knowledge is doing relatively to a pre-selected set of reference groups, where each group is composed by academics or researchers. To assess academic productivity we propose a new metric, which we call P-score. Our metric P-score assigns weights to venues using only the publication patterns of selected reference groups. This implies that P-score does not depend on citation data and thus, that it is simpler to compute particularly in contexts in which citation data is not easily available. Also, preliminary experiments suggest that P-score preserves strong correlation with citation-based metrics.
  • To manage the problem of having a higher demand for resources than availability of funds, research funding agencies usually rank the major research groups in their area of knowledge. This ranking relies on a careful analysis of the research groups in terms of their size, number of PhDs graduated, research results and their impact, among other variables. While research results are not the only variable to consider, they are frequently given special attention because of the notoriety they confer to the researchers and the programs they are affiliated with. In here we introduce a new metric for quantifying publication output, called R-Score for reputation-based score, which can be used in support to the ranking of research groups or programs. The novelty is that the metric depends solely on the listings of the publications of the members of a group, with no dependency on citation counts. R-Score has some interesting properties: (a) it does not require access to the contents of published material, (b) it can be curated to produce highly accurate results, and (c) it can be naturally used to compare publication output of research groups (e.g., graduate programs) inside a same country, geographical area, or across the world. An experiment comparing the publication output of 25 CS graduate programs from Brazil suggests that R-Score can be quite useful for providing early insights into the publication patterns of the various research groups one wants to compare.
  • In this paper we study the behavior of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) on a stationary and ergodic time varying dynamic graph. We establish conditions under which the CTRW is a stationary and ergodic process. In general, the stationary distribution of the walker depends on the walker rate and is difficult to characterize. However, we characterize the stationary distribution in the following cases: i) the walker rate is significantly larger or smaller than the rate in which the graph changes (time-scale separation), ii) the walker rate is proportional to the degree of the node that it resides on (coupled dynamics), and iii) the degrees of node belonging to the same connected component are identical (structural constraints). We provide examples that illustrate our theoretical findings.
  • Modeling and understanding BitTorrent (BT) dynamics is a recurrent research topic mainly due to its high complexity and tremendous practical efficiency. Over the years, different models have uncovered various phenomena exhibited by the system, many of which have direct impact on its performance. In this paper we identify and characterize a phenomenon that has not been previously observed: homogeneous peers (with respect to their upload capacities) experience heterogeneous download rates. The consequences of this phenomenon have direct impact on peer and system performance, such as high variability of download times, unfairness with respect to peer arrival order, bursty departures and content synchronization. Detailed packet-level simulations and prototype-based experiments on the Internet were performed to characterize this phenomenon. We also develop a mathematical model that accurately predicts the heterogeneous download rates of the homogeneous peers as a function of their content. Although this phenomenon is more prevalent in unpopular swarms (very few peers), these by far represent the most common type of swarm in BT.