• The Anderson metal-insulator transition (MIT) is central to our understanding of the quantum mechanical nature of disordered materials. Despite extensive efforts by theory and experiment, there is still no agreement on the value of the critical exponent $\nu$ describing the universality of the transition --- the so-called "exponent puzzle". In this work, going beyond the standard Anderson model, we employ ab initio methods to study the MIT in a realistic model of a doped semiconductor. We use linear-scaling DFT to simulate prototypes of sulfur-doped silicon (Si:S). From these we build larger tight-binding models close to the critical concentration of the MIT. When the dopant concentration is increased, an impurity band forms and eventually delocalizes. We characterize the MIT via multifractal finite-size scaling, obtaining the phase diagram and estimates of $\nu$. Our results suggest an explanation of the long-standing exponent puzzle, which we link to the hybridization of conduction and impurity bands.
  • We study the collective dephasing process of a system of non-interacting atomic qubits, immersed in a spatially uniform magnetic field of fluctuating intensity. The correlation properties of bipartite states are analysed based on a geometric representation of the state space. Particular emphasis is put on the dephasing-assisted generation of states with a high correlation rank, which can be related to discord-type correlations and allow for direct applications in quantum information theory. Finally we study the conditions that ensure the robustness of initial entanglement and discuss the phenomenon of time-invariant entanglement.
  • We derive an analytic solution for the ensemble-averaged collective dephasing dynamics of $N$ noninteracting atoms in a fluctuating homogeneous external field. The obtained Kraus map is used to specify families of states whose entanglement properties are preserved at all times under arbitrary field orientations, even for states undergoing incoherent evolution. Our results apply to arbitrary spectral distributions of the field fluctuations.