• Student-generated multiple-choice questions (MCQs) revised by the instructor were used to design an educational game and to set part of the exam in the framework of an elementary course in Photonics. An anonymous survey among the students revealed their general satisfaction with the method. The exam results of students who had been asked to author MCQs were compared to those of a control group subject to traditional teaching. The results of the former in the MCQ test of the exam were significantly better, without this being detrimental to their comparative performance in problem-solving.
  • The computational simulation of photo-induced processes in large molecular systems is a very challenging problem. Here, we present a detailed description of our implementation of a molecular dynamics with electronic transitions algorithm within the local-orbital density functional theory code Fireball, suitable for the computational study of these problems. Our methodology enables simulating photo-induced reaction mechanisms over hundreds of trajectories; therefore, large statistically significant ensembles can be calculated to accurately represent a reaction profile. As an example of the application of this approach, we report results on the [2+2] cycloaddition of ethylene with maleic anhydride and on the [2+2] photo-induced polymerization reaction of two C60 molecules. We identify different deactivation channels of the initial electron excitation, depending on the time of the electronic transition from LUMO to HOMO, and the character of the HOMO after the transition.
  • The interface between the tetrathiafulvalene / tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTFTCNQ) organic blend and the Au(111) metal surface is analyzed by Density Functional Theory calculations, including the effect of the charging energies on the molecule transport gaps. Given the strong donor and acceptor characters of the TTF and TCNQ molecules, respectively, there is a strong intermolecular interaction, with a relatively high charge transfer between the two organic materials. We find that the TCNQ LUMO peak is very close to the Fermi level; due to the interaction with the metal surface, the organic blend molecular levels are broadened, creating an important induced density of interface states. We show that the interface energy level alignment is controlled by the charge transfer between TTF, TCNQ and Au, and by the molecular dipoles created in the molecules because of their deformations when adsorbed on Au(111); in particular the TCNQ molecules present a bent adsorption geometry with the N atoms bonded to the Au surface. A generalization of the Unified-IDIS model, to explain how the interface energy levels alignment is achieved for the case of this blended organic layer, is presented by introducing matrix equations associated with the Charge Neutrality Levels of both organic materials and with their intermixed screening properties.
  • We present an iterative method to obtain approximations to Bessel functions of the first kind $J_p(x)$ ($p>-1$) via the repeated application of an integral operator to an initial seed function $f_0(x)$. The class of seed functions $f_0(x)$ leading to sets of increasingly accurate approximations $f_n(x)$ is considerably large and includes any polynomial. When the operator is applied once to a polynomial of degree $s$, it yields a polynomial of degree $s+2$, and so the iteration of this operator generates sets of increasingly better polynomial approximations of increasing degree. We focus on the set of polynomial approximations generated from the seed function $f_0(x)=1$. This set of polynomials is not only useful for the computation of $J_p(x)$, but also from a physical point of view, as it describes the long-time decay modes of certain fractional diffusion and diffusion-wave problems.
  • This work deals with the overdamped motion of a particle in a fluctuating one-dimensional periodic potential. If the potential has no inversion symmetry and its fluctuations are asymmetric and correlated in time, a net flow can be generated at finite temperatures. We present results for the stationary current for the case of a piecewise linear potential, especially for potentials being close to the case with inversion symmetry. The aim is to study the stationary current as a function of the potential. Depending on the form of the potential, the current changes sign once or even twice as a function of the correlation time of the potential fluctuations. To explain these current reversals, several mechanisms are proposed. Finally, we discuss to what extent the model is useful to understand the motion of biomolecular motors.