• We present an analysis of the wind circulation in the vecinity of the ground surface, for a region centered around Guatemala. We used the regional climate model RegCM to simulate the atmospheric dynamics above that region during the full year 2016. The purpose of the study is to obtain the mesoscale variation (tens of kilometers) of the wind velocity field. It can be seen that as resolution is increased, the details in topography are better represented, they in turn influence the wind circulation patterns on scales of a few kilometers. With a fine resolution of 2 km it is possible to confirm the existence of intense wind flux zones over the surface; such as Pal\'in, Escuintla. We are also able to observe diurnally varying circulations, which are the product of the daily cycle of terrain heating due to the sun and the subsecuent cooling during the night. This is the first report in a line of studies where we plan to analyze the climatic features of the Guatemalan region.
  • Gravitational wave observations will probe non-linear gravitational interactions and thus enable strong tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity. We present a numerical relativity study of the late inspiral and merger of binary black holes in scalar-tensor theories of gravity. We consider black hole binaries in an inhomogeneous scalar field, specifically binaries inside a scalar field bubble, in some cases with a potential. We calculate the emission of dipole radiation. We also show how these configurations trigger detectable differences between gravitational waves in scalar-tensor gravity and the corresponding waves in general relativity. We conclude that, barring an external mechanism to induce dynamics in the scalar field, scalar-tensor gravity binary black holes alone are not capable of awaking a dormant scalar field, and are thus observationally indistinguishable from their general relativistic counterparts.
  • Within linearized perturbation theory, black holes decay to their final stationary state through the well-known spectrum of quasinormal modes. Here we numerically study whether nonlinearities change this picture. For that purpose we study the ringdown frequencies of gauge-invariant second-order gravitational perturbations induced by self-coupling of linearized perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes. We do so through high-accuracy simulations in the time domain of first and second-order Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli type equations, for a variety of initial data sets. We consider first-order even-parity $(\ell=2,m=\pm 2)$ perturbations and odd-parity $(\ell=2,m=0)$ ones, and all the multipoles that they generate through self-coupling. For all of them and all the initial data sets considered we find that ---in contrast to previous predictions in the literature--- the numerical decay frequencies of second-order perturbations are the same ones of linearized theory, and we explain the observed behavior. This would indicate, in particular, that when modeling or searching for ringdown gravitational waves, appropriately including the standard quasinormal modes already takes into account nonlinear effects.
  • In order to generate initial data for nonlinear relativistic simulations, one needs to solve the Einstein constraints, which can be cast into a coupled set of nonlinear elliptic equations. Here we present an approach for solving these equations on three-dimensional multi-block domains using finite element methods. We illustrate our approach on a simple example of Brill wave initial data, with the constraints reducing to a single linear elliptic equation for the conformal factor $\psi$. We use quadratic Lagrange elements on semi-structured simplicial meshes, obtained by triangulation of multi-block grids. In the case of uniform refinement the scheme is superconvergent at most mesh vertices, due to local symmetry of the finite element basis with respect to local spatial inversions. We show that in the superconvergent case subsequent unstructured mesh refinements do not improve the quality of our initial data. As proof of concept that this approach is feasible for generating multi-block initial data in three dimensions, after constructing the initial data we evolve them in time using a high order finite-differencing multi-block approach and extract the gravitational waves from the numerical solution.
  • We present numerical simulations of orbiting black holes for around twelve cycles, using a high-order multipatch approach. Unlike some other approaches, the computational speed scales almost perfectly for thousands of processors. Multipatch methods are an alternative to AMR (adaptive mesh refinement), with benefits of simplicity and better scaling for improving the resolution in the wave zone. The results presented here pave the way for multipatch evolutions of black hole-neutron star and neutron star-neutron star binaries, where high resolution grids are needed to resolve details of the matter flow.
  • We present a method for extracting gravitational waves from numerical spacetimes which generalizes and refines one of the standard methods based on the Regge--Wheeler--Zerilli perturbation formalism. [abridged] We then present fully nonlinear three-dimensional numerical evolutions of a distorted Schwarzschild black hole in Kerr--Schild coordinates with an odd parity perturbation and analyze the improvement we gain from our generalized wave extraction, comparing our new method to the standard one. [abridged] We find that, even with observers as far out as $R=80 M$--which is larger than what is commonly used in state-of-the-art simulations--the assumption in the standard method that the background is close to having Schwarzschild-like coordinates increases the error in the extracted waveforms considerably. Even for our coarsest resolutions, our new method decreases the error by between one and two orders of magnitudes. Furthermore, we explicitly see that the errors in the extracted waveforms obtained by the standard method do not converge to zero with increasing resolution. [abridged] In a general scenario, for example a collision of compact objects, there is no precise definition of gravitational radiation at a finite distance, and gravitational wave extraction methods at such distances are thus inherently approximate. The results of this paper bring up the possibility that different choices in the wave extraction procedure at a fixed and finite distance may result in relative differences in the waveforms which are actually larger than the numerical errors in the solution.
  • During the last few years progress has been made on several fronts making it possible to revisit Cauchy-perturbative matching (CPM) in numerical relativity in a more robust and accurate way. This paper is the first in a series where we plan to analyze CPM in the light of these new results. Here we start by testing high-order summation-by-parts operators, penalty boundaries and contraint-preserving boundary conditions applied to CPM in a setting that is simple enough to study all the ingredients in great detail: Einstein's equations in spherical symmetry, describing a black hole coupled to a massless scalar field. We show that with the techniques described above, the errors introduced by Cauchy-perturbative matching are very small, and that very long term and accurate CPM evolutions can be achieved. Our tests include the accretion and ring-down phase of a Schwarzschild black hole with CPM, where we find that the discrete evolution introduces, with a low spatial resolution of \Delta r = M/10, an error of 0.3% after an evolution time of 1,000,000 M. For a black hole of solar mass, this corresponds to approximately 5 s, and is therefore at the lower end of timescales discussed e.g. in the collapsar model of gamma-ray burst engines. (abridged)