• We extend Feynman's analysis of the infinite ladder AC circuit to fractal AC circuits. We show that the characteristic impedances can have positive real part even though all the individual impedances inside the circuit are purely imaginary. This provides a physical setting for analyzing wave propagation of signals on fractals, by analogy with the Telegrapher's Equation, and generalizes the real resistance metric on a fractal, which provides a measure of distance on a fractal, to complex impedances.
  • We consider the most general scale invariant radial Hamiltonian allowing for anisotropic scaling between space and time. We formulate a renormalisation group analysis of this system and demonstrate the existence of a quantum phase transition from a continuous scale invariant phase to a discrete scale invariant phase. Close to the critical point, the discrete scale invariant phase is characterised by an isolated, closed, attracting trajectory in renomalisation group space (a limit cycle). Moving in appropriate directions in the parameter space of couplings this picture is altered to one controlled by a quasi periodic attracting trajectory (a limit torus) or fixed points. We identify a direct relation between the critical point, the renormalisation group picture and the power laws characterising the zero energy wave functions.
  • We demonstrate the existence of a universal transition from a continuous scale invariant phase to a discrete scale invariant phase for a class of one-dimensional quantum systems with anisotropic scaling symmetry between space and time. These systems describe a Lifshitz scalar interacting with a background potential. The transition occurs at a critical coupling $\lambda_{c}$ corresponding to a strongly attractive potential.
  • The existence and search for thermodynamic phase transitions is of unfading interest. In this paper, we present numerical evidence of dynamical phase transitions occurring in boundary driven systems with a constrained integrated current. It is shown that certain models exhibit a discontinuous transition between two different density profiles and a continuous transition between a time-independent and a time-dependent profile. We also checked that the KMP model does not exhibit phase transition in a range much larger than previously explored.
  • We present a method to probe real-time dynamics in quantum mesoscopic systems using Ramsey interferometry. This allows us to explore the effect of interactions on quasi-particles in the time domain. We investigate the dephasing effects of an ohmic environment on an electron-hole pair in a tunnel junction. We show that dynamical Coulomb blockade phenomena can be observed for resistances much smaller than the quantum of resistance. Moreover, the crossover between high and low impedance limits can be probed for a constant resistance by a proper control of the voltage modulation.
  • We present a general and useful method to predict the existence, frequency, and spatial properties of gap states in photonic (and other) structures with a gapped spectrum. This method is established using the scattering approach. It offers a viewpoint based on a geometrical Fabry-Perot model. We demonstrate the capabilities of this model by predicting the behaviour of topological edge states in quasi-periodic structures. A proposition to use this model in Casimir physics is presented.
  • A stability analysis of out of equilibrium and boundary driven systems is presented. It is performed in the framework of the hydrodynamic macroscopic fluctuation theory and assuming the additivity principle whose interpretation is discussed with the help of a Hamiltonian description. An extension of Le Chatelier principle for out of equilibrium situations is presented which allows to formulate the conditions of validity of the additivity principle. Examples of application of these results in the realm of classical and quantum systems are provided.
  • We report on the study of a polariton gas confined in a quasi-periodic one dimensional cavity, described by a Fibonacci sequence. Imaging the polariton modes both in real and reciprocal space, we observe features characteristic of their fractal energy spectrum such as the opening of mini-gaps obeying the gap labeling theorem and log-periodic oscillations of the integrated density of states. These observations are accurately reproduced solving an effective 1D Schr\"{o}dinger equation, illustrating the potential of cavity polaritons as a quantum simulator in complex topological geometries.
  • We show, using the macroscopic fluctuation theory of Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona-Lasinio, and Landim, that the statistics of the current of the symmetric simple exclusion process (SSEP) connected to two reservoirs are the same on an arbitrary large finite domain in dimension $d$ as in the one dimensional case. Numerical results on squares support this claim while results on cubes exhibit some discrepancy. We argue that the results of the macroscopic fluctuation theory should be recovered by increasing the size of the contacts. The generalization to other diffusive systems is straightforward.
  • This chapter is a pedagogical review of methods and results for studying wave propagation in one-dimensional complex structures. We describe and compare the tight-binding, scattering matrix, transfer matrix and Riccati formalisms. We present examples for transport through finite-sized layered dielectric systems with periodic, quasi-periodic, fractal, disordered, and random structure, illustrating how can spatial structure affect the spectrum of modes as well as the local mode intensity.
  • Fractals define a new and interesting realm for a discussion of basic phenomena in quantum field theory and statistical mechanics. This interest results from specific properties of fractals, e.g., their dilatation symmetry and the corresponding absence of Fourier mode decomposition. Moreover, the existence of a set of distinct dimensions characterizing the physical properties (spatial or spectral) of fractals make them a useful testing ground for dimensionality dependent physical problems. This paper addresses specific problems including the behavior of the heat kernel and spectral zeta functions on fractals and their importance in the expression of spectral properties in quantum physics. Finally, we apply these results to specific problems such as thermodynamics of quantum radiation by a fractal blackbody.
  • Spontaneous emission of a quantum emitter coupled to a QED vacuum with a deterministic fractal structure of its spectrum is considered. We show that the decay probability does not follow a Wigner-Weisskopf exponential decrease but rather an overall power law behavior with a rich oscillatory structure, both depending on the local fractal properties of the vacuum spectrum. These results are obtained by giving first a general perturbative derivation for short times. Then we propose a simplified model which retains the main features of a fractal spectrum to establish analytic expressions valid for all time scales. Finally, we discuss the case of a Fibonacci cavity and its experimental relevance to observe these results.
  • For transport processes in geometrically restricted domains, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) admits a general scaling dependence on space parameters for diffusion, anomalous diffusion, and diffusion in disordered or fractal media. For transport in self-similar fractal structures, we obtain a new expression for the source-target distance dependence of the MFPT that exhibits both the leading power law behavior, depending on the Hausdorff and spectral dimension of the fractal, as well as small log periodic oscillations that are a clear and definitive signal of the underlying fractal structure. We also present refined numerical results for the Sierpinski gasket that confirm this oscillatory behavior.
  • Sequences of alternating-sign time-dependent electric field pulses lead to coherent interference effects in Schwinger vacuum pair production, producing a Ramsey interferometer, an all-optical time-domain realization of the multiple-slit interference effect, directly from the quantum vacuum. The interference, obeying fermionic quantum statistics, is manifest in the momentum dependence of the number of produced electrons and positrons along the linearly polarized electric field. The central value grows like $N^2$ for $N$ pulses [i.e., $N$ "slits"], and the functional form is well-described by a coherent multiple-slit expression. This behavior is generic for many driven quantum systems.
  • A thermodynamical treatment of a massless scalar field (a "photon") confined to a fractal spatial manifold leads to an equation of state relating pressure to internal energy, $P V_s=U/d_s$, where $d_s$ is the spectral dimension and $V_s$ defines the "spectral volume". For regular manifolds, $V_s$ coincides with the usual geometric spatial volume, but on a fractal this is not necessarily the case. This is further evidence that on a fractal, momentum space can have a different dimension than position space. Our analysis also provides a natural definition of the vacuum (Casimir) energy of a fractal. We suggest ways that these unusual properties might be probed experimentally.
  • It has recently been realized that fractals may be characterized by complex dimensions, arising from complex poles of the corresponding zeta function, and we show here that these lead to oscillatory behavior in various physical quantities. We identify the physical origin of these complex poles as the exponentially large degeneracy of the iterated eigenvalues of the Laplacian, and discuss applications in quantum mesoscopic systems such as oscillations in the fluctuation $\Sigma^2 (E)$ of the number of levels, as a correction to results obtained in Random Matrix Theory. We present explicit expressions for these oscillations for families of diamond fractals, also studied as hierarchical lattices.
  • We present a detailed numerical study of the effect of a disordered potential on a confined one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate, in the framework of a mean-field description. For repulsive interactions, we consider the Thomas-Fermi and Gaussian limits and for attractive interactions the behavior of soliton solutions. We find that the disorder average spatial extension of the stationary density profile decreases with an increasing strength of the disordered potential both for repulsive and attractive interactions among bosons. In the Thomas Fermi limit, the suppression of transport is accompanied by a strong localization of the bosons around the state k=0 in momentum space. The time dependent density profiles differ considerably in the cases we have considered. For attractive Bose-Einstein condensates, a bright soliton exists with an overall unchanged shape, but a disorder dependent width. For weak disorder, the soliton moves on and for a stronger disorder, it bounces back and forth between high potential barriers.
  • We show that in low dimensional disordered conductors, the quasiparticle decay and the relaxation of the phase are not exponential processes. In the quasi-one dimensional case, both behave at small time as $e^{- (t/\tau_{in})^{3/2}}$ where the inelastic time $\tau_{in}$, identical for both processes, is a power $T^{2/3}$ of the temperature. This result implies the existence of an unusual distribution of relaxation times that we obtain.
  • The de Gennes free energy functional of an infinite smectic-A liquid crystal at the dual point is shown to be topological and to depend only on the number of screw dislocations and the anisotropy. This result generalizes the existence of a Bogomol'nyi bound to an anisotropic system. The role of the boundary of a finite mesoscopic smectic is to provide a mechanism for the existence of thermodynamically stable screw dislocations. We obtain a closed expression for the corresponding free energy and a relation between the applied twist and the number of screw dislocations.
  • We show that, in low dimensional conductors, the quasiparticle decay and the relaxation of the phase are not exponential processes. In quasi-one dimension, they scale as $e^{- (t/\tau_N)^{3/2}}$ where the characteristic time $\tau_{in}$, identical for both processes, is a power $T^{2/3}$ of the temperature. This result implies a distribution of relaxation times.
  • We study the vortex nucleation in a finite Bose-Einstein condensate. Using a set of non-local and chiral boundary conditions to solve the Schr$\ddot{o}$dinger equation of non-interacting bosons in a rotating trap, we obtain a quantitative expression for the characteristic angular velocity for vortex nucleation in a condensate which is found to be 35% of the transverse harmonic trapping frequency.
  • Recently a novel phase transition has been observed \cite{jalin} in a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate when the rotating frequency $\Omega$ reaches the transverse trap frequency $\omega_{\bot}$ and eventually crosses it. We study certain aspects of this experiment in terms of the condensation of composite bosons and the corresponding vortex formation using a Chern-Simon Gross-Pitaevskii theory. %
  • These notes contain a rapid overview of the methods and results obtained in the field of propagation of waves in disordered media. The case of Schr\"odinger and Helmholtz equations are considered that describe respectively electrons in metals and scalar electromagnetic waves. The assumptions on the nature of disorder are discussed and perturbation methods in the weak disorder limit are presented. A central quantity, namely the probability of quantum diffusion is defined and calculated in the same limit. It is then shown that several relevant physical quantities are related to the return probability. Examples are provided to substantiate this, which include the average electrical conductivity, its fluctuations, the average albedo and spectral correlations.
  • We study the spectral determinant of the Laplacian on finite graphs characterized by their number of vertices V and of bonds B. We present a path integral derivation which leads to two equivalent expressions of the spectral determinant of the Laplacian either in terms of a V x V vertex matrix or a 2B x 2B link matrix that couples the arcs (oriented bonds) together. This latter expression allows us to rewrite the spectral determinant as an infinite product of contributions of periodic orbits on the graph. We also present a diagrammatic method that permits us to write the spectral determinant in terms of a finite number of periodic orbit contributions. These results are generalized to the case of graphs in a magnetic field. Several examples illustrating this formalism are presented and its application to the thermodynamic and transport properties of weakly disordered and coherent mesoscopic networks is discussed.
  • The mobility of two interacting particles in a random potential is studied, using the sensitivity of their levels to a change of boundary conditions. The delocalization in Hilbert space induced by the interaction of the two particle Fock states is shown to decrease the mobility in metals and to increase it in insulators. In contrast to the single particle case, the spectral rigidity is not directly related to the level curvature. Therefore, another curvature of topological origin is introduced, which defines the energy scale below which the spectrum has the universal Wigner-Dyson rigidity.