• We study operators that combine combinatorial games. This field was initiated by Sprague-Grundy (1930s), Milnor (1950s) and Berlekamp-Conway-Guy (1970-80s) via the now classical disjunctive sum operator on (abstract) games. The new class consists in operators for rulesets, dubbed the switch-operators. The ordered pair of rulesets (R 1 , R 2) is compatible if, given any position in R 1 , there is a description of how to move in R 2. Given compatible (R 1 , R 2), we build the push-the-button game R 1 R 2 , where players start by playing according to the rules R 1 , but at some point during play, one of the players must switch the rules to R 2 , by pushing the button". Thus, the game ends according to the terminal condition of ruleset R 2. We study the pairwise combinations of the classical rulesets Nim, Wythoff and Euclid. In addition, we prove that standard periodicity results for Subtraction games transfer to this setting, and we give partial results for a variation of Domineering, where R 1 is the game where the players put the domino tiles horizontally and R 2 the game where they play vertically (thus generalizing the octal game 0.07).
  • The game of nim, with its simple rules, its elegant solution and its historical importance is the quintessence of a combinatorial game, which is why it led to so many generalizations and modifications. We present a modification with a new spin: building nim. With given finite numbers of tokens and stacks, this two-player game is played in two stages (thus belonging to the same family of games as e.g. nine-men's morris): first building, where players alternate to put one token on one of the, initially empty, stacks until all tokens have been used. Then, the players play nim. Of course, because the solution for the game of nim is known, the goal of the player who starts nim play is a placement of the tokens so that the Nim-sum of the stack heights at the end of building is different from 0. This game is trivial if the total number of tokens is odd as the Nim-sum could never be 0, or if both the number of tokens and the number of stacks are even, since a simple mimicking strategy results in a Nim-sum of 0 after each of the second player's moves. We present the solution for this game for some non-trivial cases and state a general conjecture.
  • Duch\^ene and Rigo introduced the notion of invariance for take-away games on heaps. Roughly speaking, these are games whose rulesets do not depend on the position. Given a sequence $S$ of positive tuples of integers, the question of whether there exists an invariant game having $S$ as set of $\mathcal{P}$-positions is relevant. In particular, it was recently proved by Larsson et al. that if $S$ is a pair of complementary Beatty sequences, then the answer to this question is always positive. In this paper, we show that for a fairly large set of sequences (expressed by infinite words), the answer to this question is decidable.
  • We characterize all the pairs of complementary non-homogenous Beatty sequences $(A_n)_{n\ge 0}$ and $(B_n)_{n\ge 0}$ for which there exists an invariant game having exactly $\{(A_n,B_n)\mid n\ge 0\}\cup \{(B_n,A_n)\mid n\ge 0\}$ as set of $\mathcal{P}$-positions. Using the notion of Sturmian word and tools arising in symbolic dynamics and combinatorics on words, this characterization can be translated to a decision procedure relying only on a few algebraic tests about algebraicity or rational independence. Given any four real numbers defining the two sequences, up to these tests, we can therefore decide whether or not such an invariant game exists.
  • Given a graph G with positive integer weights on the vertices, and a token placed on some current vertex u, two players alternately remove a positive integer weight from u and then move the token to a new current vertex adjacent to u. When the weight of a vertex is set to 0, it is removed and its neighborhood becomes a clique. The player making the last move wins. This adaptation of Nim on graphs is called Vertexnim, and slightly differs from the game Vertex NimG introduced by Stockman in 2004. Vertexnim can be played on both directed or undirected graphs. In this paper, we study the complexity of deciding whether a given game position of Vertexnim is winning for the first or second player. In particular, we show that for undirected graphs, this problem can be solved in quadratic time. Our algorithm is also available for the game Vertex NimG, thus improving Stockman's exptime algorithm. In the directed case, we are able to compute the winning strategy in polynomial time for several instances, including circuits or digraphs with self loops.
  • Coloring games are combinatorial games where the players alternate painting uncolored vertices of a graph one of $k > 0$ colors. Each different ruleset specifies that game's coloring constraints. This paper investigates six impartial rulesets (five new), derived from previously-studied graph coloring schemes, including proper map coloring, oriented coloring, 2-distance coloring, weak coloring, and sequential coloring. For each, we study the outcome classes for special cases and general computational complexity. In some cases we pay special attention to the Grundy function.