• A key legacy of the recently launched TESS mission will be to provide the astronomical community with many of the best transiting exoplanet targets for atmospheric characterization. However, time is of the essence to take full advantage of this opportunity. JWST, although delayed, will still complete its nominal five year mission on a timeline that motivates rapid identification, confirmation, and mass measurement of the top atmospheric characterization targets from TESS. Beyond JWST, future dedicated missions for atmospheric studies such as ARIEL require the discovery and confirmation of several hundred additional sub-Jovian size planets (R_p < 10 R_Earth) orbiting bright stars, beyond those known today, to ensure a successful statistical census of exoplanet atmospheres. Ground-based ELTs will also contribute to surveying the atmospheres of the transiting planets discovered by TESS. Here we present a set of two straightforward analytic metrics, quantifying the expected signal-to-noise in transmission and thermal emission spectroscopy for a given planet, that will allow the top atmospheric characterization targets to be readily identified among the TESS planet candidates. Targets that meet our proposed threshold values for these metrics would be encouraged for rapid follow-up and confirmation via radial velocity mass measurements. Based on the catalog of simulated TESS detections by Sullivan et al. (2015), we determine appropriate cutoff values of the metrics, such that the TESS mission will ultimately yield a sample of $\sim300$ high-quality atmospheric characterization targets across a range of planet size bins, extending down to Earth-size, potentially habitable worlds.
  • A critical bottleneck for stellar astrophysics and exoplanet science using data from the $Kepler$ mission has been the lack of precise radii and evolutionary states of the observed target stars. Here we present revised radii of 186,813 $Kepler$ stars derived by combining parallaxes from $Gaia$ Data Release 2 with the DR25 $Kepler$ Stellar Properties Catalog. The median radius precision is $\approx$8%, a factor 4-5 improvement over previous estimates for typical $Kepler$ stars. We find that $\approx$65% ($\approx$ 128,000) of all $Kepler$ targets are main-sequence stars, $\approx$23% ($\approx$ 40,600) are subgiants, and $\approx$12% ($\approx$ 23,000) are red giants, demonstrating that subgiant contamination is less severe than previously thought and that the $Kepler$ parent population mostly consists of unevolved main-sequence stars. Using the revised stellar radii, we recalculate the radii for 2218 confirmed and 1958 candidate exoplanets. Our results confirm the presence of a gap in the radius distribution of small, close-in planets, but yield evidence that the gap is mostly limited to incident fluxes $>$200$F_\oplus$ and may be located closer to 2$R_\oplus$. We furthermore find several confirmed exoplanets which occupy the "hot super-Earth desert", detect direct evidence for a correlation of gas-giant planet inflation with increasing incident flux, and establish a bona-fide sample of 8 confirmed planets and 34 planet candidates with $< 2 R_\oplus$ in the habitable zone. The results presented here demonstrate the enormous potential for the precise characterization of stellar and exoplanet populations using the transformational dataset provided by $Gaia$.
  • The first confirmed interstellar interloper in our Solar System, 1I/`Oumuamua, is likely to be a minor body ejected from another star, but its brief flyby and faintness made it difficult to study. Two remarkable properties are its large (up to 2.5 mag) rotational variability and its motion relative to the Sun before encounter. The former suggests an extremely elongated shape (aspect ratio ~10) and the latter an origin from the protoplanetary disk of a young star in a nearby association. Against expectations, it is also not comet-like. 1I/`Oumuamua's variability can also be explained if it is a contact binary composed of near-equilibrium ellipsoidal components and heterogeneous surfaces, i.e. brighter, dust-mantled inner-facing hemispheres and darker, dust-free outer-facing poles. Such shapes are a plausible outcome of radiation, tides and collisions in systems where planets are clearing planetesimal disks. The probability that 1I/`Oumuamua has the same motion as a young (<~100 Myr) stellar association by coincidence is <1%. If it is young, its detection vs. more numerous, older counterparts could be explained as a selection effect due to darkening of surfaces by Galactic cosmic rays and loss of dust. 1I/`Oumuamua's apparent lack of ices can be explained if ejected rocky planetesimals are characteristically smaller and thus far more numerous than their icy counterparts: the Solar System may currently host several such objects captured by the combined gravity of Jupiter and the Sun.
  • The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is one of four mission concepts currently being studied by NASA in preparation for the Astrophysics 2020 Decadal Survey. With active cooling (~4 K), OST will be sensitive in mid- to far-IR wavelengths, using imaging and spectroscopy to probe the furthest reaches of our galaxies, trace the path of water through star and planet formation, and place thermochemical constraints on the atmospheres of exoplanets ranging in size from Jupiter to Earth. This contribution to the Exoplanet Science Strategy committee discusses the significant advancements that the OST Mid-Infrared Imager, Spectrometer, and Coronagraph (MISC) instrument can make in studying cool planetary atmospheres. We particularly focus on the atmospheres of transiting rocky planets in the habitable zones of mid-to-late M stars. We discuss how OST thermal infrared observations can significantly enhance our understanding of the temperature structure and molecular abundances of biologically interesting gases on these worlds, including O3, CH4, H2O, and CO2.
  • We present a possible NASA key project using the iSHELL near-infrared high-resolution echelle spectrograph on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility for precise radial velocity follow-up of candidate transiting exoplanets identified by the NASA TESS mission. We briefly review key motivations and challenges with near-infrared radial velocities. We present the current status of our preliminary radial velocity analysis from the first year on sky with iSHELL.
  • Recent discoveries imply that Early Mars was habitable for life-as-we-know-it; that Enceladus might be habitable; and that many stars have Earth-sized exoplanets whose insolation favors surface liquid water. These exciting discoveries make it more likely that spacecraft now under construction - Mars 2020, ExoMars rover, JWST, Europa Clipper - will find habitable, or formerly habitable, environments. Did these environments see life? Given finite resources (\$10bn/decade for the US ), how could we best test the hypothesis of a second origin of life? Here, we first state the case for and against flying life detection missions soon. Next, we assume that life detection missions will happen soon, and propose a framework for comparing the value of different life detection missions: Scientific value = (Reach x grasp x certainty x payoff) / \$ After discussing each term in this framework, we conclude that scientific value is maximized if life detection missions are flown as hypothesis tests. With hypothesis testing, even a nondetection is scientifically valuable.
  • Despite more than 20 years since the discovery of the first gas giant planet with an anomalously large radius, the mechanism for planet inflation remains unknown. Here, we report the discovery of EPIC228754001.01, an inflated gas giant planet found with the NASA K2 Mission, and a revised mass for another inflated planet, K2-97b. These planets reside on ~9 day orbits around host stars which recently evolved into red giants. We constrain the irradiation history of these planets using models constrained by asteroseismology and Keck/HIRES spectroscopy and radial velocity measurements. We measure planet radii of 1.31 +\- 0.11 Rjup and and 1.30 +\- 0.07 Rjup, respectively. These radii are typical for planets receiving the current irradiation, but not the former, zero age main sequence irradiation of these planets. This suggests that the current sizes of these planets are directly correlated to their current irradiation. Our precise constraints of the masses and radii of the stars and planets in these systems allow us to constrain the planetary heating efficiency of both systems as 0.03% +0.03%/-0.02%. These results are consistent with a planet re-inflation scenario, but suggest the efficiency of planet re-inflation may be lower than previously theorized. Finally, we discuss the agreement within 10% of stellar masses and radii, and planet masses, radii, and orbital periods of both systems and speculate that this may be due to selection bias in searching for planets around evolved stars.
  • One of the most well-studied young stellar associations, Taurus-Auriga, will be observed by the extended Kepler mission, K2, in the spring of 2017. K2 Campaign 13 (C13) will be a unique opportunity to study many stars in this young association at high photometric precision and cadence. Using observations from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) survey, we identify "dippers", stochastic variables, and periodic variables among K2 C13 target stars. This release of the KELT data (lightcurve data in e-tables) provides the community with long-time baseline observations to assist in the understanding of the more exotic variables in the association. Transient-like phenomena on timescales of months to years are known characteristics in the light curves of young stellar objects, making contextual pre- and post-K2 observations critical to understanding their underlying processes. We are providing a comprehensive set of the KELT light curves for known Taurus-Auriga stars in K2 C13. The combined data sets from K2 and KELT should permit a broad array of investigations related to star formation, stellar variability, and protoplanetary environments.
  • We used the Robo-AO laser adaptive optics system to image 99 main sequence and subgiant stars that have Kepler-detected asteroseismic signals. Robo-AO allows us to resolve blended secondary sources at separations as close as 0.15" that may contribute to the measured Kepler light curves and affect asteroseismic analysis and interpretation. We report 8 new secondary sources within 4.0" of these Kepler asteroseismic stars. We used Subaru and Keck adaptive optics to measure differential infrared photometry for these candidate companion systems. Two of the secondary sources are likely foreground objects and at least 6 of the secondaries are background sources; however we cannot exclude the possibility that three of the objects may be physically associated. We measured a range of i'-band amplitude dilutions for the candidate companion systems from 0.43% to 15.4%. We find that the measured amplitude dilutions are insufficient to explain the previously identified excess scatter in the relationship between asteroseismic oscillation amplitude and the frequency of maximum power.
  • High-precision photometry from space-based missions such as K2 and TESS enables detailed studies of young star variability. However, because space-based observing campaigns are often short (e.g., 80 days for K2), complementary long-baseline photometric surveys are critical for obtaining a complete understanding of young star variability, which can change on timescales of minutes to years. We therefore present and analyze light curves of members of the Upper Scorpius association made over 5.5 years by the ground-based Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT), which complement the high-precision observations of this region taken by K2 during its Campaigns~2 and 15. We show that KELT data accurately identify the periodic signals found with high-precision K2 photometry, demonstrating the power of ground-based surveys in deriving stellar rotation periods of young stars. We also use KELT data to identify sources exhibiting variability that is likely related to circumstellar material and/or stellar activity cycles; these signatures are often unseen in the short-term K2 data, illustrating the importance of long-term monitoring surveys for studying the full range of young star variability. We provide the KELT light curves as electronic tables in an ongoing effort to establish legacy time-series datasets for young stellar clusters.
  • Theoretical models of stars constitute a fundamental bedrock upon which much of astrophysics is built, but large swaths of model parameter space remain uncalibrated by observations. The best calibrators are eclipsing binaries in clusters, allowing measurement of masses, radii, luminosities, and temperatures, for stars of known metallicity and age. We present the discovery and detailed characterization of PTFEB132.707+19.810, a P=6.0 day eclipsing binary in the Praesepe cluster ($\tau$~600--800 Myr; [Fe/H]=0.14$\pm$0.04). The system contains two late-type stars (SpT$_P$=M3.5$\pm$0.2; SpT$_S$=M4.3$\pm$0.7) with precise masses ($M_p=0.3953\pm0.0020$~$M_{\odot}$; $M_s=0.2098\pm0.0014$~$M_{\odot}$) and radii ($R_p=0.363\pm0.008$~$R_{\odot}$; $R_s=0.272\pm0.012$~$R_{\odot}$). Neither star meets the predictions of stellar evolutionary models. The primary has the expected radius, but is cooler and less luminous, while the secondary has the expected luminosity, but is cooler and substantially larger (by 20%). The system is not tidally locked or circularized. Exploiting a fortuitous 4:5 commensurability between $P_{orb}$ and $P_{rot,prim}$, we demonstrate that fitting errors from the unknown spot configuration only change the inferred radii by <1--2%. We also analyze subsets of data to test the robustness of radius measurements; the radius sum is more robust to systematic errors and preferable for model comparisons. We also test plausible changes in limb darkening, and find corresponding uncertainties of ~1%. Finally, we validate our pipeline using extant data for GU Boo, finding that our independent results match previous radii to within the mutual uncertainties (2--3%). We therefore suggest that the substantial discrepancies are astrophysical; since they are larger than for old field stars, they may be tied to the intermediate age of PTFEB132.707+19.810.
  • All water-covered rocky planets in the inner habitable zones of solar-type stars will inevitably experience a catastrophic runaway climate due to increasing stellar luminosity and limits to outgoing infrared radiation from wet greenhouse atmospheres. Reflectors or scatterers placed near Earth's inner Lagrange point (L1) have been proposed as a 'geo-engineering" solution to anthropogenic climate change and an advanced version of this could modulate incident irradiation over many Gyr or "rescue" a planet from the interior of the habitable zone. The distance of the starshade from the planet that minimizes its mass is 1.6 times the Earth-L1 distance. Such a starshade would have to be similar in size to the planet and the mutual occultations during planetary transits could produce a characteristic maximum at mid-transit in the light-curve. Because of a fortuitous ratio of densities, Earth-size planets around G dwarf stars present the best opportunity to detect such an artifact. The signal would be persistent and is potentially detectable by a future space photometry mission to characterize transiting planets. The signal could be distinguished from natural phenomenon, i.e. starspots or cometary dust clouds, by its shape, persistence, and transmission spectrum.
  • The star EPIC 210894022 has been identified from a light curve acquired through the K2 space mission as possibly orbited by a transiting planet. Our aim is to confirm the planetary nature of the object and derive its fundamental parameters. We combine the K2 photometry with reconnaissance spectroscopy and radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained using three separate telescope and spectrograph combinations. The spectroscopic synthesis package SME has been used to derive the stellar photospheric parameters that were used as input to various stellar evolutionary tracks in order to derive the parameters of the system. The planetary transit was also validated to occur on the assumed host star through adaptive imaging and statistical analysis. The star is found to be located in the background of the Hyades cluster at a distance at least 4 times further away from Earth than the cluster itself. The spectrum and the space velocities of EPIC 210894022 strongly suggest it to be a member of the thick disk population. We find that the star is a metal poor ([Fe/H]=-0.53+/-0.05 dex) and alpha-rich somewhat evolved solar-like object of spectral type G3 with Teff=5730+/-50 K, logg=4.15+/-0.1 (cgs), radius of 1.3+/-0.1 R_Sun, and mass of 0.88+/-0.02 M_Sun. The RV detection together with the imaging confirms with a high level of significance that the transit signature is caused by a super-Earth orbiting the star EPIC 210894022. We measure a mass of 8.6+/-3.9 M_Earth and a radius of 1.9+/-0.2 R_Earth. A second more massive object with a period longer than about 120 days is indicated by a long term linear acceleration. With an age of > 10 Gyrs this system is one of the oldest where planets is hitherto detected. Further studies of this planetary system is important since it contains information about the planetary formation process during a very early epoch of the history of our Galaxy.
  • Observations of free-free continuum radio emission of four young main-sequence solar-type stars (EK Dra, Pi1 UMa, Chi1 Ori; and Kappa1 Cet) are studied to detect stellar winds or at least to place upper limits on their thermal radio emission, which is dominated by the ionized wind. These stars are excellent proxies for representing the young Sun. Upper limits on mass loss rates are calculated using their observational radio emission. Our aim is to re-examine the faint young Sun paradox by assuming that the young Sun was more massive in its past, and hence to find a possible solution for this famous problem. The observations of our sample are performed with the Karl G. Jansky VLA with excellent sensitivity, using the C-band and the Ku-band. ALMA observations are performed at 100 GHz. For the estimation of the mass loss limits, spherically symmetric winds and stationary, anisotropic, ionized winds are assumed. We compare our results to 1) mass loss rate estimates of theoretical rotational evolution models, and 2) to results of the indirect technique of determining mass loss rates: Lyman-alpha absorption. We are able to derive the most stringent direct upper limits on mass loss so far from radio observations. Two objects, EK Dra and Chi1 Ori, are detected at 6 and 14 GHz down to an excellent noise level. These stars are very active and additional radio emission identified as non-thermal emission was detected, but limits for the mass loss rates of these objects are still derived. The stars Pi1 UMa and Kappa1 Cet were not detected in either C-band or in Ku-band. For these objects we give upper limits to their radio free-free emission and calculate upper limits to their mass loss rates. Finally, we reproduce the evolution of the Sun and derive an estimate for the solar mass of the Sun at a younger age.
  • We present the discovery of two extended $\sim$0.12 mag dimming events of the weak-lined T-Tauri star V1334. The start of the first event was missed but came to an end in late 2003, and the second began in February 2009, and continues as of November 2016. Since the egress of the current event has not yet been observed, it suggests a period of $>$13 years if this event is periodic. Spectroscopic observations suggest the presence of a small inner disk, although the spectral energy distribution shows no infrared excess. We explore the possibility that the dimming events are caused by an orbiting body (e.g. a disk warp or dust trap), enhanced disk winds, hydrodynamical fluctuations of the inner disk, or a significant increase in the magnetic field flux at the surface of the star. We also find a $\sim$0.32 day periodic photometric signal that persists throughout the 2009 dimming which appears to not be due to ellipsoidal variations from a close stellar companion. High precision photometric observations of V1334 Tau during K2 campaign 13, combined with simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations from the ground, will provide crucial information about the photometric variability and its origin.
  • Open clusters and young stellar associations are attractive sites to search for planets and to test theories of planet formation, migration, and evolution. We present our search for, and characterization of, transiting planets in the ~800 Myr old Praesepe (Beehive, M44) Cluster from K2 light curves. We identify seven planet candidates, six of which we statistically validate to be real planets, the last of which requires more data. For each host star we obtain high-resolution NIR spectra to measure its projected rotational broadening and radial velocity, the latter of which we use to confirm cluster membership. We combine low-resolution spectra with the known cluster distance and metallicity to provide precise temperatures, masses, radii, and luminosities for the host stars. Combining our measurements of rotational broadening, rotation periods, and our derived stellar radii, we show that all planetary orbits are consistent with alignment to their host star's rotation. We fit the K2 light curves, including priors on stellar density to put constraints on the planetary eccentricities, all of which are consistent with zero. The difference between the number of planets found in Praesepe and Hyades (8 planets) and a similar dataset for Pleiades (0 planets, ~125 Myr) suggests a trend with age, but may be due to incompleteness of current search pipelines for younger, faster-rotating stars. We see increasing evidence that some planets continue to lose atmosphere past 800 Myr, as now two planets at this age have radii significantly larger than their older counterparts from Kepler.
  • We provide estimates of atmospheric pressure and surface composition on short-period rocky exoplanets with dayside magma pools and silicate vapor atmospheres. Atmospheric pressure tends toward vapor-pressure equilibrium with surface magma, and magma-surface composition is set by the competing effects of fractional vaporization and surface-interior exchange. We use basic models to show how surface-interior exchange is controlled by the planet's temperature, mass, and initial composition. We assume that mantle rock undergoes bulk melting to form the magma pool, and that winds flow radially away from the substellar point. With these assumptions, we find that: (1) atmosphere-interior exchange is fast when the planet's bulk-silicate FeO concentration is low, and slow when FeO concentration is high; (2) magma pools are compositionally well-mixed for substellar temperatures $\lesssim$ 2400 K, but compositionally variegated and rapidly variable for substellar temperatures $\gtrsim$ 2400 K; (3) currents within the magma pool tend to cool the top of the solid mantle ("tectonic refrigeration"); (4) contrary to earlier work, many magma planets have time-variable surface compositions.
  • We confirm and characterize a close-in ($P_{\rm{orb}}$ = 5.425 days), super-Neptune sized ($5.04^{+0.34}_{-0.37}$ Earth radii) planet transiting K2-33 (2MASS J16101473-1919095), a late-type (M3) pre-main sequence (11 Myr-old) star in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association. The host star has the kinematics of a member of the Upper Scorpius OB association, and its spectrum contains lithium absorption, an unambiguous sign of youth (<20 Myr) in late-type dwarfs. We combine photometry from K2 and the ground-based MEarth project to refine the planet's properties and constrain the host star's density. We determine \name's bolometric flux and effective temperature from moderate resolution spectra. By utilizing isochrones that include the effects of magnetic fields, we derive a precise radius (6-7%) and mass (16%) for the host star, and a stellar age consistent with the established value for Upper Scorpius. Follow-up high-resolution imaging and Doppler spectroscopy confirm that the transiting object is not a stellar companion or a background eclipsing binary blended with the target. The shape of the transit, the constancy of the transit depth and periodicity over 1.5 years, and the independence with wavelength rules out stellar variability, or a dust cloud or debris disk partially occulting the star as the source of the signal; we conclude it must instead be planetary in origin. The existence of K2-33b suggests close-in planets can form in situ or migrate within $\sim 10$ Myr, e.g., via interactions with a disk, and that long-timescale dynamical migration such as by Lidov-Kozai or planet-planet scattering is not responsible for all short-period planets.
  • We validate a $R_p=2.32\pm 0.24R_\oplus$ planet on a close-in orbit ($P=2.260455\pm 0.000041$ days) around K2-28 (EPIC 206318379), a metal-rich M4-type dwarf in the Campaign 3 field of the K2 mission. Our follow-up observations included multi-band transit observations from the optical to the near infrared, low-resolution spectroscopy, and high-resolution adaptive-optics (AO) imaging. We perform a global fit to all the observed transits using a Gaussian process-based method and show that the transit depths in all passbands adopted for the ground-based transit follow-ups ($r'_2, z_\mathrm{s,2}, J, H, K_\mathrm{s}$) are within $\sim 2\sigma$ of the K2 value. Based on a model of the background stellar population and the absence of nearby sources in our AO imaging, we estimate the probability that a background eclipsing binary could cause a false positive to be $< 2\times 10^{-5}$. We also show that K2-28 cannot have a physically associated companion of stellar type later than M4, based on the measurement of almost identical transit depths in multiple passbands. There is a low probability for a M4 dwarf companion ($\approx 0.072_{-0.04}^{+0.02}$), but even if this were the case, the size of K2-28b falls within the planetary regime. K2-28b has the same radius (within $1\sigma$) and experiences a similar irradiation from its host star as the well-studied GJ~1214b. Given the relative brightness of K2-28 in the near infrared ($m_\mathrm{Kep}=14.85$ mag and $m_H=11.03$ mag) and relatively deep transit ($0.6-0.7\%$), a comparison between the atmospheric properties of these two planets with future observations would be especially interesting.
  • Studying the properties of young planetary systems can shed light on how the dynamics and structure of planets evolve during their most formative years. Recent K2 observations of nearby young clusters (10-800 Myr) have enabled the discovery of such planetary systems. Here we report the discovery of a Neptune-sized planet transiting an M4.5 dwarf (K2-25) in the Hyades cluster (650-800 Myr). The lightcurve shows a strong periodic signal at 1.88 days, which we attribute to spot coverage and rotation. We confirm the planet host is a member of the Hyades by measuring the radial velocity of the system with the high-resolution near-infrared spectrograph IGRINS. This enables us to calculate a distance based on EPIC 210490365's kinematics and membership to the Hyades, which in turn provides a stellar radius and mass to 5-10%, better than what is currently possible for most Kepler M dwarfs (12-20%). We use the derived stellar density as a prior on fitting the K2 transit photometry, which provides weak constraints on eccentricity. Utilizing a combination of adaptive optics imaging and high-resolution spectra we rule out the possibility that the signal is due to a bound or background eclipsing binary, confirming the transits' planetary origin. EPIC 210490365b has a radius ($3.43^{+0.95}_{-0.31}$R$_{E}$) much larger than older Kepler planets with similar orbital periods (3.484 days) and host-star masses (0.29$M_{\odot}$). This suggests that close-in planets lose some of their atmospheres past the first few hundred Myr. Additional transiting planets around the Hyades, Pleiades, and Praesepe clusters from K2 will help confirm if this planet is atypical or representative of other close-in planets of similar age.
  • We confirm a 0.995 d periodic planetary transit-like signal, KOI 6705.01, in the Kepler lightcurve of the star KIC 6423922. Optical and infrared spectra show that this star is a mid M-type dwarf with an effective temperature $= 3327 \pm 60$K, metallicity [Fe/H] $= -0.08 \pm 0.10$, radius $= 0.31 \pm 0.03 R_{\odot}$, and mass $= 0.28 \pm 0.05 M_{\odot}$. The star is $\approx 70$ pc away and its space motion, rotation period, and lack of H$\alpha$ emission indicate it is an older member of the "thin disk" population. On the other hand, the star exhibits excess infrared emission suggesting a dust disk more typical of a very young star. If the KOI 6705.01 signal is produced by a planet, the transit depth of 60 ppm means its radius is only $0.26^{+0.034}_{-0.029} R_{\oplus}$, or about the size of the Moon. However, the duration ($\gtrsim 3$~hr) and time variation of KOI 6705.01 are anomalous: the signal was undetected in the first two years of the mission and increased through the latter two years. These characteristics require implausible orbits and material properties for any planet and rule out such an explanation, although a dust cloud is possible. We excluded several false positive scenarios including background stars, scattered light from stars that are nearby on the sky, and electronic cross-talk between detector readout channels. We find the most likely explanation to be that KOI 6705.01 is a false positive created by charge transfer inefficiency in a detector column on which KIC 6423922 and a 1.99 d eclipsing binary both happened to fall.
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).
  • Precise and accurate parameters for late-type (late K and M) dwarf stars are important for characterization of any orbiting planets, but such determinations have been hampered by these stars' complex spectra and dissimilarity to the Sun. We exploit an empirically calibrated method to estimate spectroscopic effective temperature ($T_{\rm{eff}}$) and the Stefan-Boltzmann law to determine radii of 183 nearby K7-M7 single stars with a precision of 2-5%. Our improved stellar parameters enable us to develop model-independent relations between $T_{\rm{eff}}$ or absolute magnitude and radius, as well as between color and $T_{\rm{eff}}$. The derived $T_{\rm{eff}}$-radius relation depends strongly on [Fe/H], as predicted by theory. The relation between absolute $K_S$ magnitude and radius can predict radii accurate to $\simeq$3%. We derive bolometric corrections to the $VR_CI_CgrizJHK_S$ and Gaia passbands as a function of color, accurate to 1-3%. We confront the reliability of predictions from Dartmouth stellar evolution models using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo to find the values of unobservable model parameters (mass, age) that best reproduce the observed effective temperature and bolometric flux while satisfying constraints on distance and metallicity as Bayesian priors. With the inferred masses we derive a semi-empirical mass-absolute magnitude relation with a scatter of 2% in mass. The best-agreement models over-predict stellar $T_{\rm{eff}}$s by an average of 2.2% and under-predict stellar radii by 4.6%, similar to differences with values from low-mass eclipsing binaries. These differences are not correlated with metallicity, mass, or indicators of activity, suggesting issues with the underlying model assumptions e.g., opacities or convective mixing length.
  • If the photospheres of solar-type stars represent the composition of circumstellar disks from which any planets formed, spectroscopic determinations of stellar elemental abundances offer information on the composition of those planets, including smaller, rocky planets. In particular, the C/O ratio is proposed to be a key determinant of the composition of solids that condense from disk gas and are incorporated into planets. Also, planets may leave chemical signatures on the photospheres of their host stars by sequestering heavy elements, or by being accreted by the stars. The presence, absence, and composition of planets could be revealed by small differences in the relative abundances between stars. I critically examine these scenarios and show that (i) a model of Galactic chemical evolution predicts that the C/O ratio is expected to be close to the solar value and vary little between dwarf stars in the solar neighborhood; (ii) spectroscopic surveys of M dwarf stars limit the occurrence of stars with C/O $\gtrsim 1$ to $<10^{-3}$; and (iii) planetesimal chemistry will be controlled by the composition of oxygen-rich dust inherited from the molecular cloud and processed in a dust-rich environment, not a gas with the stellar composition. A second generation of more reduced planetesimals could be produced by re-equilibration of some material with dust-depleted gas. Finally, I discuss how minor differences in relative abundances between stars that correlate with condensation temperature can be explained by dust-gas segregation, perhaps in circumstellar disks, rather than planet formation.
  • We confirm and characterize the exoplanetary systems Kepler-445 and Kepler-446: two mid-M dwarf stars, each with multiple, small, short-period transiting planets. Kepler-445 is a metal-rich ([Fe/H]=+0.25 $\pm$ 0.10) M4 dwarf with three transiting planets, and Kepler-446 is a metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-0.30 $\pm$ 0.10) M4 dwarf also with three transiting planets. Kepler-445c is similar to GJ 1214b: both in planetary radius and the properties of the host star. The Kepler-446 system is similar to the Kepler-42 system: both are metal-poor with large galactic space velocities and three short-period, likely-rocky transiting planets that were initially assigned erroneously large planet-to-star radius ratios. We independently determined stellar parameters from spectroscopy and searched for and fitted the transit light curves for the planets, imposing a strict prior on stellar density in order to remove correlations between the fitted impact parameter and planet-to-star radius ratio for short-duration transits. Combining Kepler-445, Kepler-446 and Kepler-42, and isolating all mid-M dwarf stars observed by Kepler with the precision necessary to detect similar systems, we calculate that 21 $^{+7}_{-5}$ % of mid-M dwarf stars host compact multiples (multiple planets with periods of less than 10 days) for a wide range of metallicities. We suggest that the inferred planet masses for these systems support highly efficient accretion of protoplanetary disk metals by mid-M dwarf protoplanets.