• Active particles disturb the fluid around them as force dipoles, or stresslets, which govern their collective dynamics. Unlike swimming speeds, the stresslets of active particles are rarely determined due to the lack of a suitable theoretical framework for arbitrary geometry. We propose a general method, based on the reciprocal theorem of Stokes flows, to compute stresslets as integrals of the velocities on the particle's surface, which we illustrate for spheroidal chemically-active particles. Our method will allow tuning the stresslet of artificial swimmers and tailoring their collective motion in complex environments.
  • A popular method to induce synthetic propulsion at the microscale is to use the forces created by surface-produced gas bubbles inside the asymmetric body of a catalytic swimmer (referred to in the literature as microrocket). Gas bubbles nucleate and grow within the catalytic swimmer and migrate toward one of its opening under the effect of asymmetric geometric confinement, thus generating a net hydrodynamic force which propels the device. In this paper we use numerical simulations to develop a joint chemical (diffusive) and hydrodynamic (Stokes) analysis of the bubble growth within a conical catalytic microrocket and of the associated bubble and microrocket motion. Our computational model allows us to solve for the bubble dynamics over one full bubble cycle ranging from its nucleation to its exiting the conical rocket and therefore to identify the propulsion characteristics as function of all design parameters, including geometry and chemical activity of the motor, surface tension phenomena, and all physicochemical constants. Our results suggest that hydrodynamics and chemistry partially decouple in the motion of the bubbles, with hydrodynamics determining the distance travelled by the microrocket over each cycle while chemistry setting the bubble ejection frequency. Our numerical model finally allows us to identify an optimal microrocket shape and size for which the swimming velocity (distance travelled per cycle duration) is maximized.
  • A microscopic bubble of soluble gas always dissolves in finite time in an under-saturated fluid. This diffusive process is driven by the difference between the gas concentration near the bubble, whose value is governed by the internal pressure through Henry's law, and the concentration in the far field. The presence of neighbouring bubbles can significantly slow down this process by increasing the effective background concentration and reducing the diffusing flux of dissolved gas experienced by each bubble. We develop theoretical modelling of such diffusive shielding process in the case of small microbubbles whose internal pressure is dominated by Laplace pressure. We first use an exact semi-analytical solution to capture the case of two bubbles, analyse in detail the shielding effect and show that hydrodynamic effects are mostly negligible except in the case of almost-touching bubbles. In order to tackle the case of multiple bubbles, we then derive and validate two analytical approximate yet generic frameworks, first using the method of reflections and then by proposing a self-consistent continuum description. Using both modelling frameworks, we examine the dissolution of regular 1D, 2D and 3D bubble lattices. Bubbles located at the edge of the lattices dissolve first, while innermost bubbles benefit from the diffusive shielding effect, leading to the inward propagation of a dissolution front within the lattice. We show that diffusive shielding leads to severalfold increases in the dissolution time which grows logarithmically with the number of bubbles in 1D-lattices and algebraically in two and three dimensions, scaling respectively as its square root and 2/3-power. We further illustrate the sensitivity of the dissolution patterns to initial fluctuations in bubble size or arrangement in the case of large and dense lattices, as well as non-intuitive oscillatory effects.
  • Janus particles with the ability to move phoretically in self-generated chemical concentration gradients are model systems for active matter. Their motion typically consists of straight paths with rotational diffusion being the dominant reorientation mechanism. In this paper, we show theoretically that by a suitable surface coverage of both activity and mobility, translational and rotational motion can be induced arbitrarily in three dimensions. The resulting trajectories are in general helical, and their pitch and radius can be controlled by adjusting the angle between the translational and angular velocity. Building on the classical mathematical framework for axisymmetric self-phoretic motion under fixed-flux chemical boundary condition, we first show how to calculate the most general three-dimensional motion for an arbitrary surface coverage of a spherical particle. After illustrating our results on surface distributions, we next introduce a simple intuitive patch model to serve as a guide for designing arbitrary phoretic spheres.
  • Singular solutions of the Stokes equations play important roles in a variety of fluid dynamics problems. They allow the calculation of exact flows, are the basis of the boundary integral methods used in numerical computations, and can be exploited to derive asymptotic flows in a wide range of physical problems. The most fundamental singular solution is the flow's Green function due to a point force, termed the Stokeslet. Its expression is classical both in free space and near a flat surface. Motivated by problems in biological physics occurring near corners, we derive in this paper the asymptotic behaviour for the Stokeslet both near and far from a corner geometry by using complex analysis on a known double integral solution for corner flows. We investigate all possible orientations of the point force relative to the corner and all corner geometries from acute to obtuse. The case of salient corners is also addressed for point forces aligned with both walls. We use experiments on beads sedimenting in corn syrup to qualitatively test the applicability of our results. The final results and scaling laws will allow to address the role of hydrodynamic interactions in problems from colloidal science to microfluidics and biological physics.
  • Recent experiments proposed to use confined bacteria in order to generate flows near surfaces. We develop a mathematical and a computational model of this fluid transport using a linear superposition of fundamental flow singularities. The rotation of a helical bacterial flagellum induces both a force and a torque on the surrounding fluid, both of which lead to a net flow along the surface. The combined flow is in general directed at an angle to the axis of the flagellar filament. The optimal pumping is thus achieved when bacteria are tilted with respect to the direction in which one wants to move the fluid, in good agreement with experimental results. We further investigate the optimal helical shapes to be used as micropumps near surfaces and show that bacterial flagella are nearly optimal, a result which could be relevant to the expansion of bacterial swarms.
  • The bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes ulcers in the stomach of humans by invading mucus layers protecting epithelial cells. It does so by chemically changing the rheological properties of the mucus from a high-viscosity gel to a low-viscosity solution in which it may self-propel. We develop a two-fluid model for this process of swimming under self-generated confinement. We solve exactly for the flow and the locomotion speed of a spherical swimmer located in a spherically symmetric system of two Newtonian fluids whose boundary moves with the swimmer. We also treat separately the special case of an immobile outer fluid. In all cases, we characterise the flow fields, their spatial decay, and the impact of both the viscosity ratio and the degree of confinement on the locomotion speed of the model swimmer. The spatial decay of the flow retains the same power-law decay as for locomotion in a single fluid but with a decreased magnitude. Independently of the assumption chosen to characterise the impact of confinement on the actuation applied by the swimmer, its locomotion speed always decreases with an increase in the degree of confinement. Our modelling results suggest that a low-viscosity region of at least six times the effective swimmer size is required to lead to swimming with speeds similar to locomotion in an infinite fluid, corresponding to a region of size above $\approx 25~\mu$m for Helicobacter pylori.
  • The low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics of slender ribbons is accurately captured by slender-ribbon theory, an asymptotic solution to the Stokes equation which assumes that the three length scales characterising the ribbons are well separated. We show in this paper that the force distribution across the width of an isolated ribbon located in a infinite fluid can be determined analytically, irrespective of the ribbon's shape. This, in turn, reduces the surface integrals in the slender-ribbon theory equations to a line integral analogous to the one arising in slender-body theory to determine the dynamics of filaments. This result is then used to derive analytical solutions to the motion of a rigid plate ellipsoid and a ribbon torus and to propose a ribbon resistive-force theory, thereby extending the resistive-force theory for slender filaments.
  • It is known from the wave-like motion of microtubules in motility assays that the piconewton forces that motors produce can be sufficient to bend the filaments. In cellular phenomena such as cytosplasmic streaming, molecular motors translocate along cytoskeletal filaments, carrying cargo which entrains fluid. When large numbers of such forced filaments interact through the surrounding fluid, as in particular stages of oocyte development in $Drosophila~melanogaster$, complex dynamics are observed, but the detailed mechanics underlying them has remained unclear. Motivated by these observations, we study here perhaps the simplest model for these phenomena: an elastic filament, pinned at one end, acted on by a molecular motor treated as a point force. Because the force acts tangential to the filament, no matter what its shape, this "follower-force" problem is intrinsically non-variational, and thereby differs fundamentally from Euler buckling, where the force has a fixed direction, and which, in the low Reynolds number regime, ultimately leads to a stationary, energy-minimizing shape. Through a combination of linear stability theory, analytical study of a solvable simplified "two-link" model, and numerical studies of the full elastohydrodynamic equations of motion we elucidate the Hopf bifurcation that occurs with increasing forcing of a filament, leading to flapping motion analogous to the high Reynolds number oscillations of a garden hose with a free end.
  • Many cells exploit the bending or rotation of flagellar filaments in order to self-propel in viscous fluids. While appropriate theoretical modelling is available to capture flagella locomotion in simple, Newtonian fluids, formidable computations are required to address theoretically their locomotion in complex, nonlinear fluids, e.g.~mucus. Based on experimental measurements for the motion of rigid rods in non-Newtonian fluids and on the classical Carreau fluid model, we propose empirical extensions of the classical Newtonian resistive-force theory to model the waving of slender filaments in non-Newtonian fluids. By assuming the flow near the flagellum to be locally Newtonian, we propose a self-consistent way to estimate the typical shear-rate in the fluid, which we then use to construct correction factors to the Newtonian local drag coefficients. The resulting non-Newtonian resistive-force theory, while empirical, is consistent with the Newtonian limit, and with the experiments. We then use our models to address waving locomotion in non-Newtonian fluids, and show that the resulting swimming speeds are systematically lowered -- a result which we are able to capture asymptotically and to interpret physically. An application of the models to recent experimental results on the locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans in polymeric solutions shows reasonable agreement and thus captures the main physics of swimming in shear-thinning fluids.
  • Inspired by recent experiments using synthetic microswimmers to manipulate droplets, we investigate the low-Reynolds-number locomotion of a model swimmer (a spherical squirmer) encapsulated inside a droplet of comparable size in another viscous fluid. Meditated solely by hydrodynamic interactions, the encaged swimmer is seen to be able to propel the droplet, and in some situations both remain in a stable co-swimming state. The problem is tackled using both an exact analytical theory and a numerical implementation based on boundary element method, with a particular focus on the kinematics of the co-moving swimmer and droplet in a concentric configuration, and we obtain excellent quantitative agreement between the two. The droplet always moves slower than a swimmer which uses purely tangential surface actuation but when it uses a particular combination of tangential and normal actuations, the squirmer and droplet are able to attain a same velocity and stay concentric for all times. We next employ numerical simulations to examine the stability of their concentric co-movement, and highlight several stability scenarios depending on the particular gait adopted by the swimmer. Furthermore, we show that the droplet reverses the nature of the far-field flow induced by the swimmer: a droplet cage turns a pusher swimmer into a puller, and vice versa. Our work sheds light on the potential development of droplets as self-contained carriers of both chemical content and self-propelled devices for controllable and precise drug deliveries.
  • Experiments involving the two-dimensional passive diffusion of colloidal boomerangs tracked off their centre of mobility have shown striking non-Gaussian tails in their probability distribution function [Chakrabarty et al., Soft Matter 12, 4318 (2016)]. This in turn can lead to anomalous diffusion characteristics, including mean drift. In this paper, we develop a general theoretical explanation for these measurements. The idea relies on calculating the two-dimensional probability densities at the centre of mobility of the particle, where all distributions are Gaussian, and then transforming them to a different reference point. Our model clearly captures the experimental results, without any fitting parameters, and demonstrates that the one-dimensional probability distributions may also exhibit strongly non-Gaussian tops. These results indicate that the choice of tracking point can cause a considerable departure from Gaussian statistics, potentially causing some common modelling techniques to fail.
  • Phoretic swimmers provide new avenues to study non-equilibrium statistical physics and are also hailed as a promising technology for bioengineering at the cellular scale. Exact solutions for the locomotion of such swimmers have been restricted so far to spheroidal shapes. In this paper we solve for the flow induced by the canonical non-simply connected shape, namely an axisymmetric phoretic torus. The analytical solution takes the form of an infinite series solution, which we validate against boundary element computations. For a torus of uniform chemical activity, confinement effects in the hole allow the torus to act as a pump, which we optimize subject to fixed particle surface area. Under the same constraint, we next characterize the fastest swimming Janus torus for a variety of assumptions on the surface chemistry. Perhaps surprisingly, none of the optimal tori occur in the limit where the central hole vanishes.
  • One of the hallmarks of active matter is its rich nonlinear dynamics and instabilities. Recent numerical simulations of phototactic algae showed that a thin jet of swimmers, obtained from hydrodynamic focusing inside a Poiseuille flow, was unstable to longitudinal perturbations with swimmers dynamically clustering (Jibuti et al., Phys. Rev. E, 90, 2014). As a simple starting point to understand these instabilities, we consider in this paper an initially homogeneous one-dimensional line of aligned swimmers moving along the same direction, and characterise its instability using both a continuum framework and a discrete approach. In both cases, we show that hydrodynamic interactions between the swimmers lead to instabilities in density for which we compute the growth rate analytically. Lines of pusher-type swimmers are predicted to remain stable while lines of pullers (such as flagellated algae) are predicted to always be unstable.
  • Catalytic swimmers have attracted much attention as alternatives to biological systems for examining collective microscopic dynamics and the response to physico-chemical signals. Yet, understanding and predicting even the most fundamental characteristics of their individual propulsion still raises important challenges. While chemical asymmetry is widely recognized as the cornerstone of catalytic propulsion, different experimental studies have reported that particles with identical chemical properties may propel in opposite directions. Here, we show that, beyond its chemical properties, the detailed shape of a catalytic swimmer plays an essential role in determining its direction of motion, demonstrating the compatibility of the classical theoretical framework with experimental observations.
  • Artificial phoretic particles swim using self-generated gradients in chemical species (self-diffusiophoresis) or charges and currents (self-electrophoresis). These particles can be used to study the physics of collective motion in active matter and might have promising applications in bioengineering. In the case of self-diffusiophoresis, the classical physical model relies on a steady solution of the diffusion equation, from which chemical gradients, phoretic flows and ultimately the swimming velocity, may be derived. Motivated by disk-shaped particles in thin films and under confinement, we examine the extension to two dimensions. Because the two-dimensional diffusion equation lacks a steady state with the correct boundary conditions, Laplace transforms must be used to study the long-time behavior of the problem and determine the swimming velocity. For fixed chemical fluxes on the particle surface, we find that the swimming velocity ultimately always decays logarithmically in time. In the case of finite Peclet numbers, we solve the full advection-diffusion equation numerically and show that this decay can be avoided by the particle moving to regions of unconsumed reactant. Finite advection thus regularizes the two-dimensional phoretic problem.
  • Swimming microorganisms often have to propel in complex, non-Newtonian fluids. We carry out experiments with self-propelling helical swimmers driven by an externally rotating magnetic field in shear-thinning, inelastic fluids. Similarly to swimming in a Newtonian fluid, we obtain for each fluid a locomotion speed which scales linearly with the rotation frequency of the swimmer, but with a prefactor which depends on the power index of the fluid. The fluid is seen to always increase the swimming speed of the helix, up to 50% faster and thus the strongest of such type reported to date. The maximum relative increase for a fluid power index of around 0.6. Using simple scalings, we argue that the speed increase is not due to the local decrease of the flow viscosity around the helical filament but hypothesise instead that it originates from confinement-like effect due to viscosity stratification around the swimmer.
  • Cellular biology abound with filaments interacting through fluids, from intracellular microtubules, to rotating flagella and beating cilia. While previous work has demonstrated the complexity of capturing nonlocal hydrodynamic interactions between moving filaments, the problem remains difficult theoretically. We show here that when filaments are closer to each other than their relevant length scale, the integration of hydrodynamic interactions can be approximately carried out analytically. This leads to a set of simplified local equations, illustrated on a simple model of two interacting filaments, which can be used to tackle theoretically a range of problems in biology and physics.
  • Numerical study of the hydrodynamics of thin sheets and ribbons presents difficulties associated with resolving multiple length scales. To circumvent these difficulties, asymptotic methods have been developed to describe the dynamics of slender fibres and ribbons. However, such theories entail restrictions on the shapes that can be studied, and often break down in regions where standard boundary element methods are still impractical. In this paper we develop a regularised stokeslet method for ribbons and sheets in order to bridge the gap between asymptotic and boundary element methods. The method is validated against the analytical solution for plate ellipsoids, as well as the dynamics of ribbon helices and an experimental microswimmer. We then demonstrate the versatility of this method by calculating the flow around a double helix, and the swimming dynamics of a microscale "magic carpet".
  • It is now well established that nearby beating pairs of eukaryotic flagella or cilia typically synchronize in phase. A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis that hydrodynamic coupling between the active filaments, combined with waveform compliance, provides a robust mechanism for synchrony. This elastohydrodynamic mechanism has been incorporated into `bead-spring' models in which flagella are represented by microspheres tethered by radial springs as internal forces drive them about orbits. While these low-dimensional models reproduce the phenomenon of synchrony, their parameters are not readily relatable to those of flagella. More realistic models which reflect the elasticity of the axonemes and active force generation take the form of fourth-order nonlinear PDEs. While computational studies have shown synchrony, the effects of hydrodynamic coupling between nearby filaments governed by such models have been theoretically examined only in the regime of interflagellar distances $d$ large compared to flagellar length $L$. Yet, in many biological situations $d/L \ll 1$. Here, we first present an asymptotic analysis of the hydrodynamic coupling between two filaments in the regime $d/L \ll 1$, and find that the form of the coupling is independent of the details of the internal forces that govern the motion of the filaments. The analysis is like the localized induction approximation for vortex filament motion, extended to the case of mutual induction. To understand how the coupling mechanism leads to synchrony of extended objects, we introduce a heuristic model of flagellar beating, a single fourth-order nonlinear PDE whose form is derived from symmetry considerations, the physics of elasticity, and the overdamped nature of the dynamics. Analytical and numerical studies of this model illustrate how synchrony between two filaments is achieved through the asymptotic coupling.
  • Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment measured the flow in the fluid around an Escherichia coli swarm (Wu, Hosu and Berg, 2011 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108 4147). A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of the swarm with flow speeds of about $10~\mu$m/s, about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the action of cells stalled at the edge of a colony that extend their flagellar filaments outwards, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this work we quantitatively test his hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements. The results we obtain are in agreement with the flagellar hypothesis. The model provides further quantitative insight into the flagella orientations and their spatial distributions as well as the tangential speed profile. In particular, the model suggests that flagella are on average pointing radially out of the swarm and are not wrapped tangentially.
  • Swimming cells and microorganisms are a critical component of many biological processes. In order to better interpret experimental studies of low Reynolds number swimming, we combine experimental and numerical methods to perform an analysis of the flow-field around the swimming nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We first use image processing and particle tracking velocimetry to extract the body shape, kinematics, and flow-fields around the nematode. We then construct a three-dimensional model using the experimental swimming kinematics and employ a boundary element method to simulate flow-fields, obtaining very good quantitative agreement with experiment. We use this numerical model to show that calculation of flow shear rates using purely planar data results in significant underestimates of the true three-dimensional value. Applying symmetry arguments, validated against numerics, we demonstrate that the out-of-plane contribution can be accounted for via incompressibility and therefore simply calculated from particle tracking velocimetry. Our results show how fundamental fluid mechanics considerations may be used to improve the accuracy of measurements in biofluiddynamics.
  • Internal phoretic flows due to the interactions of solid boundaries with local chemical gradients may be created using chemical patterning. Alternatively, we demonstrate here that internal flows might also be induced by geometric asymmetries of chemically-homogeneous surfaces. We characterise the circulatory flow created in a cavity enclosed between two eccentric cylindrical walls of uniform chemical activity. Local gradients of the diffusing solute induce a slip flow along the surface of the cylinders, leading to a circulatory bulk flow pattern which can be solved analytically in the diffusive limit. The flow strength can be controlled by adjusting the relative positions of the cylinders and an optimal configuration is identified. These results provide a model system for tunable phoretic pumps.
  • The drag anisotropy of slender filaments is a critical physical property allowing swimming in low-Reynolds number flows, and without it linear translation is impossible. Here we show that, in contrast, net rotation can occur under isotropic drag. We first demonstrate this result formally by considering the consequences of the force- and torque-free conditions on swimming bodies and we then illustrate it with two examples (a simple swimmers made of three rods and a model bacterium with two helical flagellar filaments). Our results highlight the different role of hydrodynamic forces in generating translational vs.~rotational propulsion.
  • Ribbons are long narrow strips possessing three distinct material length scales (thickness, width, and length) which allow them to produce unique shapes unobtainable by wires or filaments. For example when a ribbon has half a twist and is bent into a circle it produces a M\"obius strip. Significant effort has gone into determining the structural shapes of ribbons but less is know about their behavior in viscous fluids. In this paper we determine, asymptotically, the leading-order hydrodynamic behavior of a slender ribbon in Stokes flows. The derivation, reminiscent of slender-body theory for filaments, assumes that the length of the ribbon is much larger than its width, which itself is much larger than its thickness. The final result is an integral equation for the force density on a mathematical ruled surface, termed the ribbon plane, located inside the ribbon. A numerical implementation of our derivation shows good agreement with the known hydrodynamics of long flat ellipsoids, and successfully captures the swimming behavior of artificial microscopic swimmers recently explored experimentally. We also study the asymptotic behavior of a ribbon bent into a helix, that of a twisted ellipsoid, and we investigate how accurately the hydrodynamics of a ribbon can be effectively captured by that of a slender filament. Our asymptotic results provide the fundamental framework necessary to predict the behavior of slender ribbons at low Reynolds numbers in a variety of biological and engineering problems.