• We describe a new method for reducing the shape noise in weak lensing measurements by an order of magnitude. Our method relies on spectroscopic measurements of disk galaxy rotation and makes use of the Tully-Fisher relation in order to control for the intrinsic orientations of galaxy disks. For this new proposed method, so-called Kinematic Lensing (KL), the shape noise ceases to be an important source of statistical error. We use the CosmoLike software package to simulate likelihood analyses for two Kinematic Lensing survey concepts (roughly similar in scale to Dark Energy Survey Task Force Stage III and Stage IV missions) and compare their constraining power to a cosmic shear survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Our forecasts in seven-dimensional cosmological parameter space include statistical uncertainties resulting from shape noise, cosmic variance, halo sample variance, and higher-order moments of the density field. We marginalize over systematic uncertainties arising from photometric redshift errors and shear calibration biases considering both optimistic and conservative assumptions about LSST systematic errors. We find that even the KL-Stage III is highly competitive with the optimistic LSST scenario, while evading the most important sources of theoretical and observational systematic error inherent in traditional weak lensing techniques. Furthermore, the KL technique enables a narrow-bin cosmic shear tomography approach to tightly constrain time-dependent signatures in the dark energy phenomenon.
  • Metacalibration is a recently introduced method to accurately measure weak gravitational lensing shear using only the available imaging data, without need for prior information about galaxy properties or calibration from simulations. The method involves distorting the image with a small known shear, and calculating the response of a shear estimator to that applied shear. The method was shown to be accurate in moderate sized simulations with galaxy images that had relatively high signal-to-noise ratios, and without significant selection effects. In this work we introduce a formalism to correct for both shear response and selection biases. We also observe that, for images with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios, the correlated noise that arises during the metacalibration process results in significant bias, for which we develop a simple empirical correction. To test this formalism, we created large image simulations based on both parametric models and real galaxy images, including tests with realistic point-spread functions. We varied the point-spread function ellipticity at the five percent level. In each simulation we applied a small, few percent shear to the galaxy images. We introduced additional challenges that arise in real data, such as detection thresholds, stellar contamination, and missing data. We applied cuts on the measured galaxy properties to induce significant selection effects. Using our formalism, we recovered the input shear with an accuracy better than a part in a thousand in all cases.
  • We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically-varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially-varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by $\sim 1$ per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the S\'{e}rsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.
  • Statistical weak lensing by large-scale structure -- cosmic shear -- is a promising cosmological tool, which has motivated the design of several large upcoming surveys. Here, we present a measurement of cosmic shear using coadded Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging in 168 square degrees of the equatorial region, with r<23.5 and i<22.5, a source number density of 2.2 galaxies per square arcminute and median redshift of 0.52. These coadds were generated using a new method described in the companion Paper I that was intended to minimise systematic errors in the lensing measurement due to coherent PSF anisotropies that are otherwise prevalent in the SDSS imaging data. We present measurements of cosmic shear out to angular separations of 2 degrees, along with systematics tests that (combined with those from Paper I on the catalogue generation) demonstrate that our results are dominated by statistical rather than systematic errors. Assuming a cosmological model corresponding to WMAP7 and allowing only the amplitude of matter fluctuations to vary, we find a best-fit value of sigma_8=0.636 +0.109 -0.154 (1-sigma); without systematic errors this would be sigma_8=0.636 +0.099 -0.137 (1-sigma). Assuming a flat LCDM model, the combined constraints with WMAP7 are sigma_8=0.784 +0.028 -0.026 (1-sigma), +0.055 -0.054 (2-sigma) and Omega_m h^2=0.1303 +0.0047 -0.0048 (1-sigma)+0.009 -0.009 (2-sigma); the 2-sigma error ranges are respectively 14 and 17 per cent smaller than WMAP7 alone. Aside from the intrinsic value of such cosmological constraints from the growth of structure, we identify some important lessons for upcoming surveys that may face similar issues when combining multi-epoch data to measure cosmic shear.
  • Weak lensing by large-scale structure is an invaluable cosmological tool given that most of the energy density of the concordance cosmology is invisible. Several large ground-based imaging surveys will attempt to measure this effect over the coming decade, but reliable control of the spurious lensing signal introduced by atmospheric turbulence and telescope optics remains a challenging problem. We address this challenge with a demonstration that point-spread function (PSF) effects on measured galaxy shapes in current ground-based surveys can be corrected with existing analysis techniques. In this work, we co-add existing Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging on the equatorial stripe in order to build a data set with the statistical power to measure cosmic shear, while using a rounding kernel method to null out the effects of the anisotropic PSF. We build a galaxy catalogue from the combined imaging, characterise its photometric properties, and show that the spurious shear remaining in this catalogue after the PSF correction is negligible compared to the expected cosmic shear signal. We identify a new source of systematic error in the shear-shear auto-correlations arising from selection biases related to masking. Finally, we discuss the circumstances in which this method is expected to be useful for upcoming ground-based surveys that have lensing as one of the science goals, and identify the systematic errors that can reduce its efficacy.
  • We describe a new method for measuring galaxy magnification due to weak gravitational lensing. Our method makes use of a tight scaling relation between galaxy properties that are modified by gravitational lensing, such as apparent size, and other properties that are not, such as surface brightness. In particular, we use a version of the well-known fundamental plane relation for early type galaxies. This modified "photometric fundamental plane" replaces velocity dispersions with photometric galaxy properties, thus obviating the need for spectroscopic data. We present the first detection of magnification using this method by applying it to photometric catalogs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This analysis shows that the derived magnification signal is comparable to that available from conventional methods using gravitational shear. We suppress the dominant sources of systematic error and discuss modest improvements that may allow this method to equal or even surpass the signal-to-noise achievable with shear. Moreover, some of the dominant sources of systematic error are substantially different from those of shear-based techniques. Thus, combining the two techniques addresses the major weaknesses of each and provides a substantial improvement over either method used in isolation. With this new technique, magnification becomes a necessary measurement tool for the coming era of large ground-based surveys intending to measure gravitational lensing.
  • We examine the pattern of star birth in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), with the goal of discerning the cluster's formation mechanism. Outside of the Trapezium, the distribution of stellar masses is remarkably uniform, and is not accurately described by the field-star initial mass function. The deconvolved, three-dimensional density of cluster members peaks at the Trapezium stars, which are truly anomalous in mass. Using theoretical pre-main-sequence tracks, we confirm the earlier finding that star formation has accelerated over the past 10 Myr. We further show that the rate of acceleration has been the same for all masses. Thus, there is no correlation between stellar age and mass, contrary to previous claims. Finally, the acceleration has been spatially uniform throughout the cluster. Our reconstruction of the parent molecular cloud spawning the cluster shows that it had a mass of 6700 solar masses prior to its destruction by the Trapezium. If the cloud was supported against self-gravity by mildly dissipative turbulence, then it contracted in a quasi-static, but accelerating manner. We demonstrate this contraction theoretically through a simple energy argument. The mean turbulent speed increased to its recent value, which is reflected in the present-day stellar velocity dispersion. The current ONC will be gravitationally unbound once cloud destruction is complete, and is destined to become a dispersing OB association. We hypothesize that similarly crowded groups seen at the centers of distant OB associations are also unbound, and do not give rise to the Galactic population of open clusters. Finally, accelerating star formation implies that most clumps within giant molecular complexes should have relatively low formation activity. Sensitive infrared surveys could confirm this hypothesis.