• In physics, biology and engineering, network systems abound. How does the connectivity of a network system combine with the behavior of its individual components to determine its collective function? We approach this question for networks with linear time-invariant dynamics by relating internal network feedbacks to the statistical prevalence of connectivity motifs, a set of surprisingly simple and local statistics of connectivity. This results in a reduced order model of the network input-output dynamics in terms of motifs structures. As an example, the new formulation dramatically simplifies the classic Erdos-Renyi graph, reducing the overall network behavior to one proportional feedback wrapped around the dynamics of a single node. For general networks, higher-order motifs systematically provide further layers and types of feedback to regulate the network response. Thus, the local connectivity shapes temporal and spectral processing by the network as a whole, and we show how this enables robust, yet tunable, functionality such as extending the time constant with which networks remember past signals. The theory also extends to networks composed from heterogeneous nodes with distinct dynamics and connectivity, and patterned input to (and readout from) subsets of nodes. These statistical descriptions provide a powerful theoretical framework to understand the functionality of real-world network systems, as we illustrate with examples including the mouse brain connectome.
  • A major obstacle to understanding neural coding and computation is the fact that experimental recordings typically sample only a small fraction of the neurons in a circuit. Measured neural properties are skewed by interactions between recorded neurons and the "hidden" portion of the network. To properly interpret neural data and determine how biological structure gives rise to neural circuit function, we thus need a better understanding of the relationships between measured effective neural properties and the true underlying physiological properties. Here, we focus on how the effective spatiotemporal dynamics of the synaptic interactions between neurons are reshaped by coupling to unobserved neurons. We find that the effective interactions from a pre-synaptic neuron $r'$ to a post-synaptic neuron $r$ can be decomposed into a sum of the true interaction from $r'$ to $r$ plus corrections from every directed path from $r'$ to $r$ through unobserved neurons. Importantly, the resulting formula reveals when the hidden units have---or do not have---major effects on reshaping the interactions among observed neurons. As a particular example of interest, we derive a formula for the impact of hidden units in random networks with "strong" coupling---connection weights that scale with $1/\sqrt{N}$, where $N$ is the network size, precisely the scaling observed in recent experiments. With this quantitative relationship between measured and true interactions, we can study how network properties shape effective interactions, which properties are relevant for neural computations, and how to manipulate effective interactions.
  • The Hawkes process is a class of point processes whose future depends on their own history. Previous theoretical work on the Hawkes process is limited to a special case in which a past event can only increase the occurrence of future events, and the link function is linear. However, in neuronal networks and other real-world applications, inhibitory relationships may be present, and the link function may be non-linear. In this paper, we develop a new approach for investigating the properties of the Hawkes process without the restriction to mutual excitation or linear link functions. To this end, we employ a thinning process representation and a coupling construction to bound the dependence coefficient of the Hawkes process. Using recent developments on weakly dependent sequences, we establish a concentration inequality for second-order statistics of the Hawkes process. We apply this concentration inequality to cross-covariance analysis in the high-dimensional regime, and we verify the theoretical claims with simulation studies.
  • Unraveling the interplay of excitation and inhibition within rhythm-generating networks remains a fundamental issue in neuroscience. We use a biophysical model to investigate the different roles of local and long-range inhibition in the respiratory network, a key component of which is the pre-B\"otzinger complex inspiratory microcircuit. Increasing inhibition within the microcircuit results in a limited number of out-of-phase neurons before rhythmicity and synchrony degenerate. Thus, unstructured local inhibition is destabilizing and cannot support the generation of more than one rhythm. A two-phase rhythm requires restructuring the network into two microcircuits coupled by long-range inhibition in the manner of a half-center. In this context, inhibition leads to greater stability of the two out-of-phase rhythms. We support our computational results with in vitro recordings from mouse pre-B\"otzinger complex. Partial excitation block leads to increased rhythmic variability, but this recovers following blockade of inhibition. Our results support the idea that local inhibition in the pre-B\"otzinger complex is present to allow for descending control of synchrony or robustness to adverse conditions like hypoxia. We conclude that the balance of inhibition and excitation determines the stability of rhythmogenesis, but with opposite roles within and between areas. These different inhibitory roles may apply to a variety of rhythmic behaviors that emerge in widespread pattern generating circuits of the nervous system.
  • Recent experimental advances are producing an avalanche of data on both neural connectivity and neural activity. To take full advantage of these two emerging datasets we need a framework that links them, revealing how collective neural activity arises from the structure of neural connectivity and intrinsic neural dynamics. This problem of {\it structure-driven activity} has drawn major interest in computational neuroscience. Existing methods for relating activity and architecture in spiking networks rely on linearizing activity around a central operating point and thus fail to capture the nonlinear responses of individual neurons that are the hallmark of neural information processing. Here, we overcome this limitation and present a new relationship between connectivity and activity in networks of nonlinear spiking neurons by developing a diagrammatic fluctuation expansion based on statistical field theory. We explicitly show how recurrent network structure produces pairwise and higher-order correlated activity, and how nonlinearities impact the networks' spiking activity. Our findings open new avenues to investigating how single-neuron nonlinearities---including those of different cell types---combine with connectivity to shape population activity and function.
  • An essential step toward understanding neural circuits is linking their structure and their dynamics. In general, this relationship can be almost arbitrarily complex. Recent theoretical work has, however, begun to identify some broad principles underlying collective spiking activity in neural circuits. The first is that local features of network connectivity can be surprisingly effective in predicting global statistics of activity across a network. The second is that, for the important case of large networks with excitatory-inhibitory balance, correlated spiking persists or vanishes depending on the spatial scales of recurrent and feedforward connectivity. We close by showing how these ideas, together with plasticity rules, can help to close the loop between network structure and activity statistics.
  • Sensory neurons give highly variable responses to stimulation, which can limit the amount of stimulus information available to downstream circuits. Much work has investigated the factors that affect the amount of information encoded in these population responses, leading to insights about the role of covariability among neurons, tuning curve shape, etc. However, the informativeness of neural responses is not the only relevant feature of population codes; of potentially equal importance is how robustly that information propagates to downstream structures. For instance, to quantify the retina's performance, one must consider not only the informativeness of the optic nerve responses, but also the amount of information that survives the spike-generating nonlinearity and noise corruption in the next stage of processing, the lateral geniculate nucleus. Our study identifies the set of covariance structures for the upstream cells that optimize the ability of information to propagate through noisy, nonlinear circuits. Within this optimal family are covariances with "differential correlations", which are known to reduce the information encoded in neural population activities. Thus, covariance structures that maximize information in neural population codes, and those that maximize the ability of this information to propagate, can be very different.
  • The primate visual system has an exquisite ability to discriminate partially occluded shapes. Recent electrophysiological recordings suggest that response dynamics in intermediate visual cortical area V4, shaped by feedback from prefrontal cortex (PFC), may play a key role. To probe the algorithms that may underlie these findings, we build and test a model of V4 and PFC interactions based on a hierarchical predictive coding framework. We propose that probabilistic inference occurs in two steps. Initially, V4 responses are driven solely by bottom-up sensory input and are thus strongly influenced by the level of occlusion. After a delay, V4 responses combine both feedforward input and feedback signals from the PFC; the latter reflect predictions made by PFC about the visual stimulus underlying V4 activity. We find that this model captures key features of V4 and PFC dynamics observed in experiments. Specifically, PFC responses are strongest for occluded stimuli and delayed responses in V4 are less sensitive to occlusion, supporting our hypothesis that the feedback signals from PFC underlie robust discrimination of occluded shapes. Thus, our study proposes that area V4 and PFC participate in hierarchical inference, with feedback signals encoding top-down predictions about occluded shapes.
  • Whole-brain neural connectivity data are now available from viral tracing experiments, which reveal the connections between a source injection site and elsewhere in the brain. These hold the promise of revealing spatial patterns of connectivity throughout the mammalian brain. To achieve this goal, we seek to fit a weighted, nonnegative adjacency matrix among 100 $\mu$m brain "voxels" using viral tracer data. Despite a multi-year experimental effort, injections provide incomplete coverage, and the number of voxels in our data is orders of magnitude larger than the number of injections, making the problem severely underdetermined. Furthermore, projection data are missing within the injection site because local connections there are not separable from the injection signal. We use a novel machine-learning algorithm to meet these challenges and develop a spatially explicit, voxel-scale connectivity map of the mouse visual system. Our method combines three features: a matrix completion loss for missing data, a smoothing spline penalty to regularize the problem, and (optionally) a low rank factorization. We demonstrate the consistency of our estimator using synthetic data and then apply it to newly available Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas data for the visual system. Our algorithm is significantly more predictive than current state of the art approaches which assume regions to be homogeneous. We demonstrate the efficacy of a low rank version on visual cortex data and discuss the possibility of extending this to a whole-brain connectivity matrix at the voxel scale.
  • Highly connected recurrent neural networks often produce chaotic dynamics, meaning their precise activity is sensitive to small perturbations. What are the consequences for how such networks encode streams of temporal stimuli? On the one hand, chaos is a strong source of randomness, suggesting that small changes in stimuli will be obscured by intrinsically generated variability. On the other hand, recent work shows that the type of chaos that occurs in spiking networks can have a surprisingly low-dimensional structure, suggesting that there may be "room" for fine stimulus features to be precisely resolved. Here we show that strongly chaotic networks produce patterned spikes that reliably encode time-dependent stimuli: using a decoder sensitive to spike times on timescales of 10's of ms, one can easily distinguish responses to very similar inputs. Moreover, recurrence serves to distribute signals throughout chaotic networks so that small groups of cells can encode substantial information about signals arriving elsewhere. A conclusion is that the presence of strong chaos in recurrent networks does not prohibit precise stimulus encoding.
  • While recent recordings from neural populations show beyond-pairwise, or higher-order correlations (HOC), we have little understanding of how HOC arise from network interactions and of how they impact encoded information. Here, we show that input nonlinearities imply HOC in spin-glass-type statistical models. We then discuss one such model with parameterized pairwise- and higher-order interactions, revealing conditions under which beyond-pairwise interactions increase the mutual information between a given stimulus type and the population responses. For jointly Gaussian stimuli, coding performance is improved by shaping output HOC only when neural firing rates are constrained to be low. For stimuli with skewed probability distributions (like natural image luminances), performance improves for all firing rates. Our work suggests surprising connections between nonlinear integration of neural inputs, stimulus statistics, and normative theories of population coding. Moreover, it suggests that the inclusion of beyond-pairwise interactions could improve the performance of Boltzmann machines for machine learning and signal processing applications.
  • Which statistical features of spiking activity matter for how stimuli are encoded in neural populations? A vast body of work has explored how firing rates in individual cells and correlations in the spikes of cell pairs impact coding. But little is known about how higher-order correlations, which describe simultaneous firing in triplets and larger ensembles of cells, impact encoded stimulus information. Here, we take a first step toward closing this gap. We vary triplet correlations in small (~10 cell) neural populations while keeping single cell and pairwise statistics fixed at typically reported values. For each value of triplet correlations, we estimate the performance of the neural population on a two-stimulus discrimination task. We identify a predominant way that such triplet correlations can strongly enhance coding: if triplet correlations differ for the two stimuli, they skew the response distributions of the two stimuli apart from each other, separating them and making them easier to distinguish. This coding benefit does not occur when both stimuli elicit similar triplet correlations. These results indicate that higher-order correlations could have a strong effect on population coding. Finally, we calculate how many samples are necessary to accurately measure spiking correlations of this type, providing an estimate of the necessary recording times in experiments.
  • Large networks of sparsely coupled, excitatory and inhibitory cells occur throughout the brain. A striking feature of these networks is that they are chaotic. How does this chaos manifest in the neural code? Specifically, how variable are the spike patterns that such a network produces in response to an input signal? To answer this, we derive a bound for the entropy of multi-cell spike pattern distributions in large recurrent networks of spiking neurons responding to fluctuating inputs. The analysis is based on results from random dynamical systems theory and is complimented by detailed numerical simulations. We find that the spike pattern entropy is an order of magnitude lower than what would be extrapolated from single cells. This holds despite the fact that network coupling becomes vanishingly sparse as network size grows -- a phenomenon that depends on ``extensive chaos," as previously discovered for balanced networks without stimulus drive. Moreover, we show how spike pattern entropy is controlled by temporal features of the inputs. Our findings provide insight into how neural networks may encode stimuli in the presence of inherently chaotic dynamics.
  • Over repeat presentations of the same stimulus, sensory neurons show variable responses. This "noise" is typically correlated between pairs of cells, and a question with rich history in neuroscience is how these noise correlations impact the population's ability to encode the stimulus. Here, we consider a very general setting for population coding, investigating how information varies as a function of noise correlations, with all other aspects of the problem - neural tuning curves, etc. - held fixed. This work yields unifying insights into the role of noise correlations. These are summarized in the form of theorems, and illustrated with numerical examples involving neurons with diverse tuning curves. Our main contributions are as follows. (1) We generalize previous results to prove a sign rule (SR) - if noise correlations between pairs of neurons have opposite signs vs. their signal correlations, then coding performance will improve compared to the independent case. This holds for three different metrics of coding performance, and for arbitrary tuning curves and levels of heterogeneity. This generality is true for our other results as well. (2) As also pointed out in the literature, the SR does not provide a necessary condition for good coding. We show that a diverse set of correlation structures can improve coding. Many of these violate the SR, as do experimentally observed correlations. There is structure to this diversity: we prove that the optimal correlation structures must lie on boundaries of the possible set of noise correlations. (3) We provide a novel set of necessary and sufficient conditions, under which the coding performance (in the presence of noise) will be as good as it would be if there were no noise present at all.
  • How does connectivity impact network dynamics? We address this question by linking network characteristics on two scales. On the global scale we consider the coherence of overall network dynamics. We show that such \emph{global coherence} in activity can often be predicted from the \emph{local structure} of the network. To characterize local network structure we use "motif cumulants," a measure of the deviation of pathway counts from those expected in a minimal probabilistic network model. We extend previous results in three ways. First, we give a new combinatorial formulation of motif cumulants that relates to the allied concept in probability theory. Second, we show that the link between global network dynamics and local network architecture is strongly affected by heterogeneity in network connectivity. However, we introduce a network-partitioning method that recovers a tight relationship between architecture and dynamics. Third, for a particular set of models we generalize the underlying theory to treat dynamical coherence at arbitrary orders (i.e. triplet correlations, and beyond). We show that at any order only a highly restricted set of motifs impact dynamical correlations.
  • The collective dynamics of neural populations are often characterized in terms of correlations in the spike activity of different neurons. Open questions surround the basic nature of these correlations. In particular, what leads to higher-order correlations -- correlations in the population activity that extend beyond those expected from cell pairs? Here, we examine this question for a simple, but ubiquitous, circuit feature: common fluctuating input arriving to spiking neurons of integrate-and-fire type. We show that leads to strong higher-order correlations, as for earlier work with discrete threshold crossing models. Moreover, we find that the same is true for another widely used, doubly-stochastic model of neural spiking, the linear-nonlinear cascade. We explain the surprisingly strong connection between the collective dynamics produced by these models, and conclude that higher-order correlations are both broadly expected and possible to capture with surprising accuracy by simplified (and tractable) descriptions of neural spiking.
  • Emerging technologies are revealing the spiking activity in ever larger neural ensembles. Frequently, this spiking is far from independent, with correlations in the spike times of different cells. Understanding how such correlations impact the dynamics and function of neural ensembles remains an important open problem. Here we describe a new, generative model for correlated spike trains that can exhibit many of the features observed in data. Extending prior work in mathematical finance, this generalized thinning and shift (GTaS) model creates marginally Poisson spike trains with diverse temporal correlation structures. We give several examples which highlight the model's flexibility and utility. For instance, we use it to examine how a neural network responds to highly structured patterns of inputs. We then show that the GTaS model is analytically tractable, and derive cumulant densities of all orders in terms of model parameters. The GTaS framework can therefore be an important tool in the experimental and theoretical exploration of neural dynamics.
  • Biological information processing is often carried out by complex networks of interconnected dynamical units. A basic question about such networks is that of reliability: if the same signal is presented many times with the network in different initial states, will the system entrain to the signal in a repeatable way? Reliability is of particular interest in neuroscience, where large, complex networks of excitatory and inhibitory cells are ubiquitous. These networks are known to autonomously produce strongly chaotic dynamics - an obvious threat to reliability. Here, we show that such chaos persists in the presence of weak and strong stimuli, but that even in the presence of chaos, intermittent periods of highly reliable spiking often coexist with unreliable activity. We elucidate the local dynamical mechanisms involved in this intermittent reliability, and investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and certain time-dependent attractors arising from the dynamics. A conclusion is that chaotic dynamics do not have to be an obstacle to precise spike responses, a fact with implications for signal coding in large networks.
  • Recent experimental and computational evidence suggests that several dynamical properties may characterize the operating point of functioning neural networks: critical branching, neutral stability, and production of a wide range of firing patterns. We seek the simplest setting in which these properties emerge, clarifying their origin and relationship in random, feedforward networks of McCullochs-Pitts neurons. Two key parameters are the thresholds at which neurons fire spikes, and the overall level of feedforward connectivity. When neurons have low thresholds, we show that there is always a connectivity for which the properties in question all occur: that is, these networks preserve overall firing rates from layer to layer and produce broad distributions of activity in each layer. This fails to occur, however, when neurons have high thresholds. A key tool in explaining this difference is eigenstructure of the resulting mean-field Markov chain, as this reveals which activity modes will be preserved from layer to layer. We extend our analysis from purely excitatory networks to more complex models that include inhibition and 'local' noise, and find that both of these features extend the parameter ranges over which networks produce the properties of interest.
  • Stimulus from the environment that guides behavior and informs decisions is encoded in the firing rates of neural populations. Each neuron in the populations, however, does not spike independently: spike events are correlated from cell to cell. To what degree does this apparent redundancy impact the accuracy with which decisions can be made, and the computations that are required to optimally decide? We explore these questions for two illustrative models of correlation among cells. Each model is statistically identical at the level of pairs cells, but differs in higher-order statistics that describe the simultaneous activity of larger cell groups. We find that the presence of correlations can diminish the performance attained by an ideal decision maker to either a small or large extent, depending on the nature of the higher-order interactions. Moreover, while this optimal performance can in some cases be obtained via the standard integration-to-bound operation, in others it requires a nonlinear computation on incoming spikes. Overall, we conclude that a given level of pairwise correlations--even when restricted to identical neural populations--may not always indicate redundancies that diminish decision making performance.
  • Motifs are patterns of subgraphs of complex networks. We studied the impact of such patterns of connectivity on the level of correlated, or synchronized, spiking activity among pairs of cells in a recurrent network model of integrate and fire neurons. For a range of network architectures, we find that the pairwise correlation coefficients, averaged across the network, can be closely approximated using only three statistics of network connectivity. These are the overall network connection probability and the frequencies of two second-order motifs: diverging motifs, in which one cell provides input to two others, and chain motifs, in which two cells are connected via a third intermediary cell. Specifically, the prevalence of diverging and chain motifs tends to increase correlation. Our method is based on linear response theory, which enables us to express spiking statistics using linear algebra, and a resumming technique, which extrapolates from second order motifs to predict the overall effect of coupling on network correlation. Our motif-based results seek to isolate the effect of network architecture perturbatively from a known network state.
  • Describing the collective activity of neural populations is a daunting task: the number of possible patterns grows exponentially with the number of cells, resulting in practically unlimited complexity. Recent empirical studies, however, suggest a vast simplification in how multi-neuron spiking occurs: the activity patterns of some circuits are nearly completely captured by pairwise interactions among neurons. Why are such pairwise models so successful in some instances, but insufficient in others? Here, we study the emergence of higher-order interactions in simple circuits with different architectures and inputs. We quantify the impact of higher-order interactions by comparing the responses of mechanistic circuit models vs. "null" descriptions in which all higher-than-pairwise correlations have been accounted for by lower order statistics, known as pairwise maximum entropy models. We find that bimodal input signals produce larger deviations from pairwise predictions than unimodal inputs for circuits with local and global connectivity. Moreover, recurrent coupling can accentuate these deviations, if coupling strengths are neither too weak nor too strong. A circuit model based on intracellular recordings from ON parasol retinal ganglion cells shows that a broad range of light signals induce unimodal inputs to spike generators, and that coupling strengths produce weak effects on higher-order interactions. This provides a novel explanation for the success of pairwise models in this system. Overall, our findings identify circuit-level mechanisms that produce and fail to produce higher-order spiking statistics in neural ensembles.
  • Model-based studies of auditory nerve responses to electrical stimulation can provide insight into the functioning of cochlear implants. Ideally, these studies can identify limitations in sound processing strategies and lead to improved methods for providing sound information to cochlear implant users. To accomplish this, models must accurately describe auditory nerve spiking while avoiding excessive complexity that would preclude large-scale simulations of populations of auditory nerve fibers and obscure insight into the mechanisms that influence neural encoding of sound information. In this spirit, we develop a point process model of the auditory nerve that provides a compact and accurate description of neural responses to electric stimulation. Inspired by the framework of generalized linear models, the proposed model consists of a cascade of linear and nonlinear stages. We show how each of these stages can be associated with biophysical mechanisms and related to models of neuronal dynamics. Moreover, we derive a semi-analytical procedure that uniquely determines each parameter in the model on the basis of fundamental statistics from recordings of single fiber responses to electric stimulation, including threshold, relative spread, jitter, and chronaxie. The model also accounts for refractory and summation effects that influence the responses of auditory nerve fibers to high pulse rate stimulation. Throughout, we compare model predictions to published physiological data and explain differences in auditory nerve responses to high and low pulse rate stimulation. We close by performing an ideal observer analysis of simulated spike trains in response to sinusoidally amplitude modulated stimuli and find that carrier pulse rate does not affect modulation detection thresholds.
  • A key step in many perceptual decision tasks is the integration of sensory inputs over time, but fundamental questions remain about how this is accomplished in neural circuits. One possibility is to balance decay modes of membranes and synapses with recurrent excitation. To allow integration over long timescales, however, this balance must be precise; this is known as the fine tuning problem. The need for fine tuning can be overcome via a ratchet-like mechanism, in which momentary inputs must be above a preset limit to be registered by the circuit. The degree of this ratcheting embodies a tradeoff between sensitivity to the input stream and robustness against parameter mistuning. The goal of our study is to analyze the consequences of this tradeoff for decision making performance. For concreteness, we focus on the well-studied random dot motion discrimination task. For stimulus parameters constrained by experimental data, we find that loss of sensitivity to inputs has surprisingly little cost for decision performance. This leads robust integrators to performance gains when feedback becomes mistuned. Moreover, we find that substantially robust and mistuned integrator models remain consistent with chronometric and accuracy functions found in experiments. We explain our findings via sequential analysis of the momentary and integrated signals, and discuss their implication: robust integrators may be surprisingly well-suited to subserve the basic function of evidence integration in many cognitive tasks.
  • Novel experimental techniques reveal the simultaneous activity of larger and larger numbers of neurons. As a result there is increasing interest in the structure of cooperative -- or correlated -- activity in neural populations, and in the possible impact of such correlations on the neural code. A fundamental theoretical challenge is to understand how the architecture of network connectivity along with the dynamical properties of single cells shape the magnitude and timescale of correlations. We provide a general approach to this problem by extending prior techniques based on linear response theory. We consider networks of general integrate-and-fire cells with arbitrary architecture, and provide explicit expressions for the approximate cross-correlation between constituent cells. These correlations depend strongly on the operating point (input mean and variance) of the neurons, even when connectivity is fixed. Moreover, the approximations admit an expansion in powers of the matrices that describe the network architecture. This expansion can be readily interpreted in terms of paths between different cells. We apply our results to large excitatory-inhibitory networks, and demonstrate first how precise balance --- or lack thereof --- between the strengths and timescales of excitatory and inhibitory synapses is reflected in the overall correlation structure of the network. We then derive explicit expressions for the average correlation structure in randomly connected networks. These expressions help to identify the important factors that shape coordinated neural activity in such networks.