• Majorana modes are zero-energy excitations of a topological superconductor that exhibit non-Abelian statistics. Following proposals for their detection in a semiconductor nanowire coupled to an s-wave superconductor, several tunneling experiments reported characteristic Majorana signatures. Reducing disorder has been a prime challenge for these experiments because disorder can mimic the zero-energy signatures of Majoranas, and renders the topological properties inaccessible. Here, we show characteristic Majorana signatures in InSb nanowire devices exhibiting clear ballistic transport properties. Application of a magnetic field and spatial control of carrier density using local gates generates a zero bias peak that is rigid over a large region in the parameter space of chemical potential, Zeeman energy, and tunnel barrier potential. The reduction of disorder allows us to resolve separate regions in the parameter space with and without a zero bias peak, indicating topologically distinct phases. These observations are consistent with the Majorana theory in a ballistic system, and exclude for the first time the known alternative explanations that invoke disorder or a nonuniform chemical potential.
  • Majorana zero-modes hold great promise for topological quantum computing. Tunnelling spectroscopy in electrical transport is the primary tool to identify the presence of Majorana zero-modes, for instance as a zero-bias peak (ZBP) in differential-conductance. The Majorana ZBP-height is predicted to be quantized at the universal conductance value of 2e2/h at zero temperature. Interestingly, this quantization is a direct consequence of the famous Majorana symmetry, 'particle equals antiparticle'. The Majorana symmetry protects the quantization against disorder, interactions, and variations in the tunnel coupling. Previous experiments, however, have shown ZBPs much smaller than 2e2/h, with a recent observation of a peak-height close to 2e2/h. Here, we report a quantized conductance plateau at 2e2/h in the zero-bias conductance measured in InSb semiconductor nanowires covered with an Al superconducting shell. Our ZBP-height remains constant despite changing parameters such as the magnetic field and tunnel coupling, i.e. a quantized conductance plateau. We distinguish this quantized Majorana peak from possible non-Majorana origins, by investigating its robustness on electric and magnetic fields as well as its temperature dependence. The observation of a quantized conductance plateau strongly supports the existence of non-Abelian Majorana zero-modes in the system, consequently paving the way for future braiding experiments.
  • Semiconductor nanowires have opened new research avenues in quantum transport owing to their confined geometry and electrostatic tunability. They have offered an exceptional testbed for superconductivity, leading to the realization of hybrid systems combining the macroscopic quantum properties of superconductors with the possibility to control charges down to a single electron. These advances brought semiconductor nanowires to the forefront of efforts to realize topological superconductivity and Majorana modes. A prime challenge to benefit from the topological properties of Majoranas is to reduce the disorder in hybrid nanowire devices. Here, we show ballistic superconductivity in InSb semiconductor nanowires. Our structural and chemical analyses demonstrate a high-quality interface between the nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor which enables ballistic transport. This is manifested by a quantized conductance for normal carriers, a strongly enhanced conductance for Andreev-reflecting carriers, and an induced hard gap with a significantly reduced density of states. These results pave the way for disorder-free Majorana devices.
  • Semiconductor nanowires provide an ideal platform for various low-dimensional quantum devices. In particular, topological phases of matter hosting non-Abelian quasi-particles can emerge when a semiconductor nanowire with strong spin-orbit coupling is brought in contact with a superconductor. To fully exploit the potential of non-Abelian anyons for topological quantum computing, they need to be exchanged in a well-controlled braiding operation. Essential hardware for braiding is a network of single-crystalline nanowires coupled to superconducting islands. Here, we demonstrate a technique for generic bottom-up synthesis of complex quantum devices with a special focus on nanowire networks having a predefined number of superconducting islands. Structural analysis confirms the high crystalline quality of the nanowire junctions, as well as an epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor interface. Quantum transport measurements of nanowire "hashtags" reveal Aharonov-Bohm and weak-antilocalization effects, indicating a phase coherent system with strong spin-orbit coupling. In addition, a proximity-induced hard superconducting gap is demonstrated in these hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowires, highlighting the successful materials development necessary for a first braiding experiment. Our approach opens new avenues for the realization of epitaxial 3-dimensional quantum device architectures.
  • Topological superconductivity is a state of matter that can host Majorana modes, the building blocks of a topological quantum computer. Many experimental platforms predicted to show such a topological state rely on proximity-induced superconductivity. However, accessing the topological properties requires an induced hard superconducting gap, which is challenging to achieve for most material systems. We have systematically studied how the interface between an InSb semiconductor nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor affects the induced superconducting properties. Step by step, we improve the homogeneity of the interface while ensuring a barrier-free electrical contact to the superconductor, and obtain a hard gap in the InSb nanowire. The magnetic field stability of NbTiN allows the InSb nanowire to maintain a hard gap and a supercurrent in the presence of magnetic fields (~ 0.5 Tesla), a requirement for topological superconductivity in one-dimensional systems. Our study provides a guideline to induce superconductivity in various experimental platforms such as semiconductor nanowires, two dimensional electron gases and topological insulators, and holds relevance for topological superconductivity and quantum computation.
  • Quantum simulation is a way to study unexplored Hamiltonians by mapping them onto the assemblies of well-understood quantum systems such as ultracold atoms in optical lattices, trapped ions or superconducting circuits. Semiconductor nanostructures which form the backbone of classical computing hold largely untapped potential for quantum simulation. In particular, chains of quantum dots in semiconductor nanowires can be used to emulate one-dimensional Hamiltonians such as the toy model of a topological p-wave superconductor. Here we realize a building block of this model, a double quantum dot with superconducting contacts, in an indium antimonide nanowire. In each dot, tunnel-coupling to a superconductor induces Andreev bound states. We demonstrate that these states hybridize to form the double-dot Andreev molecular states. We establish the parity and the spin structure of Andreev molecular levels by monitoring their evolution in electrostatic potential and magnetic field. Understanding Andreev molecules is a key step towards building longer chains which are predicted to generate Majorana bound states at the end sites. Two superconducting quantum dots are already sufficient to test the fusion rules of Majorana bound states, a milestone towards fault-tolerant topological quantum computing.
  • Topological superconductors can host Majorana quasiparticles which supersede the fermion/boson dichotomy and offer a pathway to fault tolerant quantum computation. In one-dimensional systems zero-energy Majorana states are bound to the ends of the topologically superconducting regions. An experimental signature of a Majorana bound state is a conductance peak at zero source-drain voltage bias in a tunneling experiment. Here, we identify the bulk topological phase in a semiconductor nanowire coupled to a conventional superconductor. We map out its phase diagram through the dependence of zero-bias peak on the chemical potential and magnetic field. Our findings are consistent with calculations for a finite-length topological nanowire. Knowledge of the phase diagram makes it possible to predictably tune nanowire segments in and out of the topological phase, thus controlling the positions and couplings of multiple Majorana bound states. This ability is a prerequisite for Majorana braiding, an experiment in which Majorana quantum states are exchanged in order to both demonstrate their non-abelian character and realize topological quantum bits.
  • We define single quantum dots of lengths varying from 60 nm up to nearly half a micron in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires. The charging energies scale inversely with the quantum dot length between 18 and 4 meV. Subsequently, we split up a long dot into a double quantum dot with a separate control over the tunnel couplings and the electrochemical potential of each dot. Both single and double quantum dot configurations prove to be very stable and show excellent control over the electrostatic environment of the dots, making this system a highly versatile platform for spin-based quantum computing.
  • We present measurements on gate-defined double quantum dots in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires, which we tune to a regime with visible shell filling in both dots. We observe a Pauli spin blockade and can assign the measured leakage current at low magnetic fields to spin-flip cotunneling, for which we measure a strong anisotropy related to an anisotropic g-factor. At higher magnetic fields we see signatures for leakage current caused by spin-orbit coupling between (1,1)-singlet and (2,0)-triplet states. Taking into account these anisotropic spin-flip mechanisms, we can choose the magnetic field direction with the longest spin lifetime for improved spin-orbit qubits.
  • We demonstrate that optical transmission matrices (TM) of disordered complex media provide a powerful tool to extract the photonic interaction strength, independent of surface effects. We measure TM of strongly scattering GaP nanowires and plot the singular value density of the measured matrices and a random matrix model. By varying the free parameters of the model, the transport mean free path and effective refractive index, we retrieve the photonic interaction strength. From numerical simulations we conclude that TM statistics is hardly sensitive to surface effects, in contrast to enhanced backscattering or total transmission based methods.
  • Controlling the dispersion and directionality of the emission of nanosources is one of the major goals of nanophotonics research. This control will allow the development of highly efficient nanosources even at the single photon level. One of the ways to achieve this goal is to couple the emission to Bloch modes of periodic structures. Here, we present the first measurements of the directional emission from nanowire photonic crystals by using Fourier microscopy. With this technique we efficiently collect and resolve the directional emission of nanowires within the numerical aperture of a microscope objective. The light emission from a heterostructure grown in each nanowire is governed by the photonic (Bloch) modes of the photonic crystal. We also demonstrate that the directionality of the emission can be easily controlled by infiltrating the photonic crystal with a high refractive index liquid. This work opens new possibilities for the control of the emission of sources in nanowires.
  • A generic process has been developed to grow nearly defect free arrays of (heterostructured) InP and GaP nanowires. Soft nanoimprint lithography has been used to pattern gold particle arrays on full 2 inch substrates. After lift-off organic residues remain on the surface, which induce the growth of additional undesired nanowires. We show that cleaning of the samples before growth with piranha solution in combination with a thermal anneal at 550 C for InP and 700 C for GaP results in uniform nanowire arrays with 1% variation in nanowire length, and without undesired extra nanowires. Our chemical cleaning procedure is applicable to other lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography, and therefore represents a generic process.