• Weyl fermions are a new ingredient for correlated states of electronic matter. A key difficulty has been that real materials also contain non-Weyl quasiparticles, and disentangling the experimental signatures has proven challenging. We use magnetic fields up to 95 tesla to drive the Weyl semimetal TaAs far into its quantum limit (QL), where only the purely chiral 0th Landau levels (LLs) of the Weyl fermions are occupied. We find the electrical resistivity to be nearly independent of magnetic field up to 50 tesla: unusual for conventional metals but consistent with the chiral anomaly for Weyl fermions. Above 50 tesla we observe a two-order-of-magnitude increase in resistivity, indicating that a gap opens in the chiral LLs. Above 80 tesla we observe strong ultrasonic attenuation below 2 kelvin, suggesting a mesoscopically-textured state of matter. These results point the way to inducing new correlated states of matter in the QL of Weyl semimetals.
  • Although quantum Hall plateau transitions have been the prime examples of quantum criticality in a disordered electron system for the past three decades, many questions remain unanswered. Scaling of the measured electrical conductivity in the vicinity of these transitions reveals the surprising phenomenon of superuniversality where different transitions appear to share the same correlation length and dynamical critical exponent. Previous theoretical studies of these transitions within the framework of Abelian Chern-Simons theory coupled to matter found critical exponents that appear to directly depend on the change of the Hall conductivity across a specific phase transition, in contrast to what is observed experimentally. Here, we use non-Abelian bosonization and modular transformations to investigate theoretically the phenomenon of superuniversality. Specifically, we introduce a new effective theory that has an emergent $U(N)$ gauge symmetry with $N > 1$ for a quantum phase transition between an integer quantum Hall state and an insulator. We then use modular transformations to generate from this theory new effective descriptions for transitions between a large class of fractional quantum Hall states whose quasiparticle excitations have Abelian statistics. In the 't Hooft large $N$ limit, the correlation length and dynamical critical exponents are independent of the particular transition. We argue that this superuniversality survives away from the large $N$ limit using recent duality conjectures.
  • There has been a recent surge of interest in dualities relating theories of Chern-Simons gauge fields coupled to either bosons or fermions within the condensed matter community, particularly in the context of topological insulators and the half-filled Landau level. Here, we study the application of one such duality to the long-standing problem of quantum Hall inter-plateaux transitions. The key motivating experimental observations are the anomalously large value of the correlation length exponent $\nu \approx 2.3$ and that $\nu$ is observed to be super-universal, i.e., the same in the vicinity of distinct critical points. Duality motivates effective descriptions for a fractional quantum Hall plateau transition involving a Chern-Simons field with $U(N_c)$ gauge group coupled to $N_f = 1$ fermion. We study one class of theories in a controlled limit where $N_f \gg N_c$ and calculate $\nu$ to leading non-trivial order in the absence of disorder. Although these theories do not yield an anomalously large exponent $\nu$ within the large $N_f \gg N_c$ expansion, they do offer a new parameter space of theories that is apparently different from prior works involving abelian Chern-Simons gauge fields.
  • Nematicity in quantum Hall systems has been experimentally well established at excited Landau levels. The mechanism of the symmetry breaking, however, is still unknown. Pomeranchuk instability of Fermi liquid parameter $F_{\ell} \le -1$ in the angular momentum $\ell=2$ channel has been argued to be the relevant mechanism, yet there are no definitive theoretical proofs. Here we calculate, using the variational Monte Carlo technique, Fermi liquid parameters $F_\ell$ of the composite fermion Fermi liquid with a finite layer width. We consider $F_{\ell}$ in different Landau levels $n=0,1,2$ as a function of layer width parameter $\eta$. We find that unlike the lowest Landau level, which shows no sign of Pomeranchuk instability, higher Landau levels show nematic instability below critical values of $\eta$. Furthermore the critical value $\eta_c$ is higher for the $n=2$ Landau level, which is consistent with observation of nematic order in ambient conditions only in the $n=2$ Landau levels. The picture emerging from our work is that approaching the true 2D limit brings half-filled higher Landau level systems to the brink of nematic Pomeranchuk instability.
  • When very high magnetic fields suppress the superconductivity in underdoped cuprates, an exceptional new electronic phase appears. It supports remarkable and unexplained quantum oscillations and exhibits an unidentified density wave (DW) state. Although generally referred to as a "charge" density wave (CDW) because of the observed charge density modulations, theory indicates that this could actually be the far more elusive electron-pair density wave state (PDW). To search for evidence of a field-induced PDW in cuprates, we visualize the modulations in the density of electronic states $N(\bf{r})$ within the halo surrounding Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_8$ vortex cores. This reveals multiple signatures of a field-induced PDW, including two sets of $N(\bf{r})$ modulations occurring at wavevectors $\bf{Q}_P$ and $2\bf{Q}_P$, both having predominantly $s$-symmetry form factors, the amplitude of the latter decaying twice as rapidly as the former, along with induced energy-gap modulations at $\bf{Q}_P$ . Such a microscopic phenomenology is in detailed agreement with theory for a field-induced primary PDW that generates secondary CDWs within the vortex halo. These data indicate that the fundamental state generated by increasing magnetic fields from the underdoped cuprate superconducting phase is actually a PDW with approximately eight CuO$_2$ unit-cell periodicity ($\lambda = 8a_0$) and predominantly $d$-symmetry form factor.
  • Recent experiments demonstrating large spin-transfer torques in topological insulator (TI)-ferromagnetic metal (FM) bilayers have generated a great deal of excitement due to their potential applications in spintronics. The source of the observed spin-transfer torque, however, remains unclear. This is because the large charge transfer from the FM to TI layer would prevent the Dirac cone at the interface from being anywhere near the Fermi level to contribute to the observed spin-transfer torque. Moreover, there is yet little understanding of the impact on the Dirac cone at the interface from the metallic bands overlapping in energy and momentum, where strong hybridization could take place. Here, we build a simple microscopic model and perform first-principles-based simulations for such a TI-FM heterostructure, considering the strong hybridization and charge transfer effects. We find that the original Dirac cone is destroyed by the hybridization as expected. Instead, we find a new interface state which we dub 'descendent state' to form near the Fermi level due to the strong hybridization with the FM states at the same momentum. Such a `descendent state' carries a sizable weight of the original Dirac interface state, and thus inherits the localization at the interface and the same Rashba-type spin-momentum locking. We propose that the `descendent state' may be an important source of the experimentally observed large spin-transfer torque in the TI-FM heterostructure.
  • Interest in modulated paired states, long sought since the first proposals by Fulde and Ferrell and by Larkin and Ovchinnikov, has grown recently in the context of strongly coupled superconductors under the name of pair density wave. However, there is little theoretical understanding of how such a state might arise out of strong coupling physics in simple models. Although density matrix renormalization group has been a powerful tool for exploring strong coupling modulation phenomena of spin and charge stripe in the Hubbard model and the t-J model, there has been no numerical evidence of PDW within these models using DMRG. Here we note that a system with inversion breaking, C3v point group symmetry may host a PDW-like state. Motivated by the fact that spin-valley locked band structure of hole-doped group VI transition metal dichalcogenides materializes such a setting, we use DMRG to study the superconducting tendencies in spin-valley locked systems with strong short-ranged repulsion. Remarkably we find robust evidence for a PDW and the first of such evidence within DMRG studies of a simple fermionic model.
  • One dimensional hybrid systems play an important role in the search for topological superconductivity. Nevertheless, all one dimensional hybrid systems so far have been externally defined. Here we show that one-dimensional domain wall in a nematic superconductor can serve as an emergent hybrid system in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. As a concrete setting we study the domain wall between nematic domains in FeSe, which is well established to be a nematic superconductor. We first show on the symmetry grounds that spin-triplet pairing can be induced at the domain wall by constructing a Ginzburg-Landau theory. We then demonstrate using Bogoliubov-de Gennes approach that such nematic domain wall supports zero energy bound states which would satisfy Majorana condition. Well-known existence of these domain walls at relatively high temperatures, which can in principle be located and investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy, presents new opportunities for a search for realization of Majorana bound states.
  • Despite its seemingly simple composition and structure, the pairing mechanism of FeSe remains an open problem due to several striking phenomena. Among them are nematic order without magnetic order, nodeless gap and unusual inelastic neutron spectra with a broad continuum, and gap anisotropy consistent with orbital selection of unknown origin. Here we propose a microscopic description of a nematic quantum spin liquid that reproduces key features of neutron spectra. We then study how the spin fluctuations of the local moments lead to pairing within a spin-fermion model. We find the resulting superconducting order parameter to be nodeless $s\pm d$-wave within each domain. Further we show that orbital dependent Hund's coupling can readily capture observed gap anisotropy. Our prediction calls for inelastic neutron scattering in a detwinned sample.
  • After decades of progress and effort, obtaining a phase diagram for a strongly-correlated topological system still remains a challenge. Although in principle one could turn to Wilson loops and long-range entanglement, evaluating these non-local observables at many points in phase space can be prohibitively costly. With growing excitement over topological quantum computation comes the need for an efficient approach for obtaining topological phase diagrams. Here we turn to machine learning using quantum loop topography (QLT), a notion we have recently introduced. Specifically, we propose a construction of QLT that is sensitive to quasi-particle statistics. We then use mutual statistics between the spinons and visions to detect a $\mathbb Z_2$ quantum spin liquid in a multi-parameter phase space. We successfully obtain the quantum phase boundary between the topological and trivial phases using a simple feed forward neural network. Furthermore we demonstrate how our approach can speed up evaluation of the phase diagram by orders of magnitude. Such statistics-based machine learning of topological phases opens new efficient routes to studying topological phase diagrams in strongly correlated systems.
  • Theoretically it has been known that breaking spin-degeneracy and effectively realizing 'spinless fermions' is a promising path to topological superconductors. Yet, topological superconductors are rare to date. Here, we propose to realize spinless fermions by splitting the spin-degeneracy in momentum space. Specifically, we identify monolayer hole-doped transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD)s as candidates for topological superconductors out of such momentum-space-split spinless fermions. Although electron-doped TMDs have recently been found superconducting, the observed superconductivity is unlikely topological due to the near spin-degeneracy. Meanwhile, hole-doped TMDs with momentum-space-split spinless fermions remain unexplored. Employing a renormalization group analysis, we propose that the unusual spin-valley locking in hole-doped TMDs together with repulsive interactions selectively favors two topological superconducting states: inter-pocket paired state with Chern number 2 and intra-pocket paired state with finite pair-momentum. A confirmation of our predictions will open up possibilities for manipulating topological superconductors on the device friendly platform of monolayer TMDs.
  • Despite rapidly growing interest in harnessing machine learning in the study of quantum many-body systems, training neural networks to identify quantum phases is a nontrivial challenge. The key challenge is in efficiently extracting essential information from the many-body Hamiltonian or wave function and turning the information into an image that can be fed into a neural network. When targeting topological phases, this task becomes particularly challenging as topological phases are defined in terms of non-local properties. Here we introduce quantum loop topography (QLT): a procedure of constructing a multi-dimensional image from the "sample" Hamiltonian or wave function by evaluating two-point operators that form loops at independent Monte Carlo steps. The loop configuration is guided by characteristic response for defining the phase, which is Hall conductivity for the cases at hand. Feeding QLT to a fully-connected neural network with a single hidden layer, we demonstrate that the architecture can be effectively trained to distinguish Chern insulator and fractional Chern insulator from trivial insulators with high fidelity. In addition to establishing the first case of obtaining a phase diagram with topological quantum phase transition with machine learning, the perspective of bridging traditional condensed matter theory with machine learning will be broadly valuable.
  • Recent experimental advances in using strain engineering to significantly alter the band structure of moderately correlated systems offer opportunities and challenges to weak-coupling renormalization group (RG) analysis approaches for predicting superconducting instabilities. On one hand, the RG approach can provide theoretical guidance. On the other hand, it is now imperative to better understand how the predictions of the RG approach depends on microscopic and non-universal model details. Here we focus on the effect of band-selective mass-renormalization often observed in angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Focusing on a specific example of uniaxially strained $\rm{Sr_2RuO_4}$ we carry out the weak-coupling RG analysis from two sets of band structures as starting points: one is based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations and the other is based on angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements. Despite good agreement between the Fermi surfaces of the the two band structures we find the two sets of band structures to predict qualitatively different trends in the strain dependence of the superconducting transition temperature $T_c$ as well as the dominant channel.
  • Chemical substitution plays a key role in controlling the electronic and magnetic properties of complex materials. For instance, in EuO, carrier doping can induce a spin-polarized metallic state, colossal magnetoresistance, and significantly enhance the Curie temperature. Here, we employ a combination of molecular-beam epitaxy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and an effective model calculation to investigate and understand how semi-localized states evolve in lightly electron doped Eu$_{1-x}$Gd$_{x}$O above the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. Our studies reveal a characteristic length scale for the spatial extent of the donor wavefunctions which remains constant as a function of doping, consistent with recent tunneling studies of doped EuO. Our work sheds light on the nature of the semiconductor-to-metal transition in Eu$_{1-x}$Gd$_{x}$O and should be generally applicable for doped complex oxides.
  • Half-filled Landau levels form a zoo of strongly correlated phases. These include non-Fermi liquids (NFL), fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states, nematic phases, and FQH nematic phases. This diversity poses the question: what keeps the balance between the seemingly unrelated phases? The answer is elusive because the Halperin-Lee-Read (HLR) description that offers a natural departure point is inherent strongly coupled. But the observed nematic phases suggest nematic fluctuations play an important role. To study this possibility, we apply a recently formulated controlled double expansion approach in large-$N$ composite fermion flavors and small $\epsilon$ non-analytic bosonic action to the case with both gauge and nematic boson fluctuations. In the vicinity of a nematic quantum critical line (NQCL), we find that depending on the amount of screening of the gauge- and nematic-mediated interactions controlled by $\epsilon$'s, the RG flow points to all four mentioned correlated phases. When pairing preempts the nematic phase, NFL behavior is possible at temperatures above the pairing transition. We conclude by discussing measurements at low tilt angles which could reveal the stabilization of the FQH phase by nematic fluctuations.
  • Theories based upon strong real space (r-space) electron electron interactions have long predicted that unidirectional charge density modulations (CDM) with four unit cell (4$a_0$) periodicity should occur in the hole doped cuprate Mott insulator (MI). Experimentally, however, increasing the hole density p is reported to cause the conventionally defined wavevector $Q_A$ of the CDM to evolve continuously as if driven primarily by momentum space (k-space) effects. Here we introduce phase resolved electronic structure visualization for determination of the cuprate CDM wavevector. Remarkably, this new technique reveals a virtually doping independent locking of the local CDM wavevector at $|Q_0|=2\pi/4a_0$ throughout the underdoped phase diagram of the canonical cuprate $Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8$. These observations have significant fundamental consequences because they are orthogonal to a k-space (Fermi surface) based picture of the cuprate CDM but are consistent with strong coupling r-space based theories. Our findings imply that it is the latter that provide the intrinsic organizational principle for the cuprate CDM state.
  • There is now copious direct experimental evidence of various forms of (short-range) charge order in underdoped cuprate high temperature superconductors, and spectroscopic signatures of a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in the structure of the single-particle spectral functions. In this context, we analyze the Bogoliubov quasiparticle spectrum in a superconducting nematic glass. The coincidence of the superconducting "nodal points" and the nematic "cold-spots" on the Fermi surface naturally accounts for many of the most salient features of the measured spectral functions (from angle-resolved photoemission) and the local density of states (from scanning tunneling microscopy).
  • The key challenge in superconductivity research is to go beyond the historical mode of discovery-driven research. We put forth a new strategy, which is to combine theoretical developments in the weak-coupling renormalization group approach with the experimental developments in lattice strain driven Fermi surface-engineering. For concreteness we theoretically investigate how superconducting tendencies will be affected by strain engineering of ruthenates' Fermi surface. We first demonstrate that our approach qualitatively reproduces recent experiments under uniaxial strain. We then note that order few $\%$ strain readily accessible to epitaxial thin films, can bring the Fermi surface close to van Hove singularity. Using the experimental observation of the change in the Fermi surface under biaxial epitaxial strain and ab-initio calculations, we predict ${\rm T}_{\rm c}$ for triplet pairing to be maximized by getting close to the van Hove singularities without tuning on to the singularity.
  • Heterostructures utilizing topological insulators exhibit a remarkable spin-torque efficiency. However, the exact origin of the strong torque, in particular whether it stems from the spin-momentum locking of the topological surface states or rather from spin-Hall physics of the topological-insulator bulk remains unclear. Here, we explore a mechanism of spin-torque generation purely based on the topological surface states. We consider topological-insulator-based bilayers involving ferromagnetic metal (TI/FM) and magnetically doped topological insulators (TI/mdTI), respectively. By ascribing the key theoretical differences between the two setups to location and number of active surface states, we describe both setups within the same framework of spin diffusion of the non-equilibrium spin density of the topological surface states. For the TI/FM bilayer, we find large spin-torque efficiencies of roughly equal magnitude for both in-plane and out-of-plane spin torques. For the TI/mdTI bilayer, we elucidate the dominance of the spin-transfer-like torque. However, we cannot explain the orders of magnitude enhancement reported. Nevertheless, our model gives an intuitive picture of spin-torque generation in topological-insulator-based bilayers and provides theoretical constraints on spin-torque generation due to topological surface states.
  • The original proposal to achieve superconductivity by starting from a quantum spin-liquid (QSL) and doping it with charge carriers, as proposed by Anderson in 1987, has yet to be realized. Here we propose an alternative strategy: use a QSL as a substrate for heterostructure growth of metallic films to design exotic superconductors. By spatially separating the two key ingredients of superconductivity, i.e., charge carriers (metal) and pairing interaction (QSL), the proposed setup naturally lands on the parameter regime conducive to a controlled theoretical prediction. Moreover, the proposed setup allows us to "customize" electron-electron interaction imprinted on the metallic layer. The QSL material of our choice is quantum spin ice well-known for its emergent gauge-field description of spin frustration. Assuming the metallic layer forms an isotropic single Fermi pocket, we predict that the coupling between the emergent gauge-field and the electrons of the metallic layer will drive topological odd-parity pairing. We further present guiding principles for materializing the suitable heterostructure using ab initio calculations and describe the band structure we predict for the case of Y$_2$Sn$_{2-x}$Sb$_x$O$_7$ grown on the (111) surface of Pr$_2$Zr$_2$O$_7$. Using this microscopic information, we predict topological odd-parity superconductivity at a few Kelvin in this heterostructure, which is comparable to the $T_c$ of the only other confirmed odd-parity superconductor Sr$_2$RuO$_4$.
  • Recent theoretical insights into the possibility of non-Abelian phases in $\nu=2/3$ fractional quantum Hall states revived the interest in the numerical phase diagram of the problem. We investigate the effect of various kinds of two-body interlayer couplings on the $(330)$ bilayer state and exactly solve the Hamiltonian for up to $14$ electrons on sphere and torus geometries. We consider interlayer tunneling, short-ranged repulsive/attractive pseudopotential interactions and Coulomb repulsion. We find a 6-fold ground-state degeneracy on the torus when the interlayer hollow-core interaction is dominant. To identify the topological nature of this phase we measure the orbital-cut entanglement spectrum, quasihole counting, topological entanglement entropy, and wave-function overlap. Comparing the numerical results to the theoretical predictions, we interpret this 6-fold ground-state degeneracy phase to be the non-Abelian bilayer Fibonacci state.
  • Recent findings of anomalous super-linear scaling of low temperature ($T$) penetration depth (PD) in several nodal superconductors near putative quantum critical points suggest that the low temperature PD can be a useful probe of quantum critical fluctuations in a superconductor. On the other hand, cuprates which are poster child nodal superconductors have not shown any such anomalous scaling of PD, despite growing evidence of quantum critical points. Then it is natural to ask when and how can quantum critical fluctuations cause anomalous scaling of PD? Carrying out the renormalization group calculation for the problem of two dimensional superconductors with point nodes, we show that quantum critical fluctuations associated with point group symmetry reduction result in non-universal logarithmic corrections to the $T$-dependence of the PD. The resulting apparent power law depends on the bare velocity anisotropy ratio. We then compare our results to data sets from two distinct nodal superconductors: YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6.95}$ and CeCoIn$_5$. Considering all symmetry-lowering possibilities of the point group of interest, $C_{4v}$, we find our results to be remarkably consistent with YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6.95}$ being near vertical nematic QCP, and CeCoIn$_5$ being near diagonal nematic QCP. Our results motivate search for diagonal nematic fluctuations in CeCoIn$_5$.
  • Much interest in the superconducting proximity effect in three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) has been driven by the potential to induce Majorana bound states at the interface. Most candidate materials for 3D TI, however, are bulk metals, with bulk states at the Fermi level coexisting with well-defined surface states exhibiting spin-momentum locking. In such topological metals, the proximity effect can differ qualitatively from that in TIs. By studying a model topological metal-superconductor (TM-SC) heterostructure within the Bogoliubov-de Gennes formalism, we show that the pair amplitude reaches the naked surface, unlike in a topological insulator-superconductor (TI-SC) heterostructure where it is confined to the interface. Furthermore, we predict vortex-bound-state spectra to contain a Majorana zero-mode localized at the naked surface, separated from the bulk vortex-bound-state spectra by a finite energy gap in such a TM-SC heterostructure. These naked-surface-bound modes are amenable to experimental observation and manipulation, presenting advantages of TM-SC over TI-SC.
  • Recent experimental discoveries have brought a diverse set of broken symmetry states to the center stage of research on cuprate superconductors. Here, we focus on a thematic understanding of the diverse phenomenology by exploring a strong-coupling mechanism of symmetry breaking driven by frustration of antiferromagnetic order. We achieve this through a variational study of a three-band model of the CuO$_2$ plane with Kondo-type exchange couplings between doped oxygen holes and classical copper spins. Two main findings from this strong-coupling multi-band perspective are 1) that the symmetry hierarchy of spin stripe, charge stripe, intra-unit-cell nematic order and isotropic phases are all accessible microscopically within the model, 2) many symmetry-breaking patterns compete with energy differences within a few meV per Cu atom to produce a rich phase diagram. These results indicate that the diverse phenomenology of broken-symmetry states in hole-doped antiferromagnetic charge-transfer insulators may indeed arise from hole-doped frustration of antiferromagnetism.
  • Cooper pairing in the iron-based high-Tc superconductors is often conjectured to involve bosonic fluctuations. Among the candidates are antiferromagnetic spin-fluctuations and d-orbital fluctuations amplified by phonons. Any such electron-boson interaction should alter the electron's `self-energy', and then become detectable through consequent modifications in the energy dependence of the electron's momentum and lifetime. Here we introduce a theoretical/experimental approach aimed at identifying the relevant fluctuations of iron-based superconductors by measuring effects of their self-energy. We use quasiparticle interference (QPI) imaging techniques in LiFeAs to reveal strongly momentum-space anisotropic self-energy signatures that are focused along the Fe-Fe (interband scattering) direction, where the spin fluctuations of LiFeAs are concentrated. These effects coincide in energy with perturbations to the density-of-states N(\omega) usually associated with the Cooper pairing interaction. We show that all the measured phenomena comprise the predicted QPI `fingerprint' of a self-energy due to antiferromagnetic spin-fluctuations, thereby distinguishing them as the predominant electron-boson interaction.