• We study the transition between steady flows of non-cohesive granular materials in quasi-2D bounded heaps by suddenly changing the feed rate. In both experiments and simulations, the primary feature of the transition is a wedge of flowing particles that propagates downstream over the rising free surface with a wedge front velocity inversely proportional to the square root of time. An additional longer duration transient process continues after the wedge front reaches the downstream wall. The entire transition is well modeled as a moving boundary problem with a diffusion-like equation derived from local mass balance and a local relation between the flux and the surface slope.
  • We study the transition between steady flows of non-cohesive granular materials in quasi-2D bounded heaps by suddenly changing the feed rate. In both experiments and simulations, the primary feature of the transition is a wedge of flowing particles that propagates downstream over the rising free surface with a wedge front velocity inversely proportional to the square root of time. An additional longer duration transient process continues after the wedge front reaches the downstream wall. The entire transition is well modeled as a moving boundary problem with a diffusion-like equation derived from local mass balance and a local relation between the flux and the surface slope.
  • We study the transition between steady flows of non-cohesive granular materials in quasi-2D bounded heaps by suddenly changing the feed rate. In both experiments and simulations, the primary feature of the transition is a wedge of flowing particles that propagates downstream over the rising free surface with a wedge front velocity inversely proportional to the square root of time. An additional longer duration transient process continues after the wedge front reaches the downstream wall. The entire transition is well modeled as a moving boundary problem with a diffusion-like equation derived from local mass balance and a local relation between the flux and the surface slope.
  • Remarkably persistent mixing and non-mixing regions (islands) are observed to coexist in a three-dimensional dynamical system where randomness is expected. The track of an x-ray opaque particle in a spherical shell half-filled with dry non-cohesive particles and periodically rotated about two axes reveals interspersed structures that are spatially complex and vary non-trivially with the rotation angles. The geometric skeleton of the structures forms from the subtle interplay between fluid-like mixing by stretching-and-folding, and solids mixing by cutting-and-shuffling, which is described by the mathematics of piecewise isometries. In the physical system, larger islands predicted by the cutting-and-shuffling model alone can persist despite the presence of stretching-and-folding flows and particle-collision-driven diffusion, while predicted smaller islands are not observed. By uncovering the synergy of simultaneous fluid and solid mixing, we point the way to a more fundamental understanding of advection driven mixing in materials with both solid and flowing regions.
  • Remarkably persistent mixing and non-mixing regions (islands) are observed to coexist in a three-dimensional dynamical system where randomness is expected. The track of an x-ray opaque particle in a spherical shell half-filled with dry non-cohesive particles and periodically rotated about two axes reveals interspersed structures that are spatially complex and vary non-trivially with the rotation angles. The geometric skeleton of the structures forms from the subtle interplay between fluid-like mixing by stretching-and-folding, and solids mixing by cutting-and-shuffling, which is described by the mathematics of piecewise isometries. In the physical system, larger islands predicted by the cutting-and-shuffling model alone can persist despite the presence of stretching-and-folding flows and particle-collision-driven diffusion, while predicted smaller islands are not observed. By uncovering the synergy of simultaneous fluid and solid mixing, we point the way to a more fundamental understanding of advection driven mixing in materials with both solid and flowing regions.
  • Remarkably persistent mixing and non-mixing regions (islands) are observed to coexist in a three-dimensional dynamical system where randomness is expected. The track of an x-ray opaque particle in a spherical shell half-filled with dry non-cohesive particles and periodically rotated about two axes reveals interspersed structures that are spatially complex and vary non-trivially with the rotation angles. The geometric skeleton of the structures forms from the subtle interplay between fluid-like mixing by stretching-and-folding, and solids mixing by cutting-and-shuffling, which is described by the mathematics of piecewise isometries. In the physical system, larger islands predicted by the cutting-and-shuffling model alone can persist despite the presence of stretching-and-folding flows and particle-collision-driven diffusion, while predicted smaller islands are not observed. By uncovering the synergy of simultaneous fluid and solid mixing, we point the way to a more fundamental understanding of advection driven mixing in materials with both solid and flowing regions.
  • Remarkably persistent mixing and non-mixing regions (islands) are observed to coexist in a three-dimensional dynamical system where randomness is expected. The track of an x-ray opaque particle in a spherical shell half-filled with dry non-cohesive particles and periodically rotated about two axes reveals interspersed structures that are spatially complex and vary non-trivially with the rotation angles. The geometric skeleton of the structures forms from the subtle interplay between fluid-like mixing by stretching-and-folding, and solids mixing by cutting-and-shuffling, which is described by the mathematics of piecewise isometries. In the physical system, larger islands predicted by the cutting-and-shuffling model alone can persist despite the presence of stretching-and-folding flows and particle-collision-driven diffusion, while predicted smaller islands are not observed. By uncovering the synergy of simultaneous fluid and solid mixing, we point the way to a more fundamental understanding of advection driven mixing in materials with both solid and flowing regions.
  • Gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes encode the evolution of their spins prior to merger. In the post-Newtonian regime and on the precession timescale, this evolution has one of three morphologies, with the spins either librating around one of two fixed points ("resonances") or circulating freely. In this work we perform full parameter estimation on resonant binaries with fixed masses and spin magnitudes, changing three parameters: a conserved "projected effective spin" $\xi$ and resonant family $\Delta\Phi=0,\pi$ (which uniquely label the source), the inclination $\theta_{JN}$ of the binary's total angular momentum with respect to the line of sight (which determines the strength of precessional effects in the waveform), and the signal amplitude. We demonstrate that resonances can be distinguished for a wide range of binaries, except for highly symmetric configurations where precessional effects are suppressed. Motivated by new insight into double-spin evolution, we introduce new variables to characterize precessing black hole binaries which naturally reflects the timescale separation of the system and therefore better encode the dynamical information carried by gravitational waves.
  • An exact expression for the leading-order (LO) gluon distribution function $G(x,Q^2)=xg(x,Q^2)$ from the DGLAP evolution equation for the proton structure function $F_2^{\gamma p}(x,Q^2)$ for deep inelastic $\gamma^* p$ scattering has recently been obtained [M. M. Block, L. Durand and D. W. McKay, Phys. Rev. D{\bf 79}, 014031, (2009)] for massless quarks, using Laplace transformation techniques. Here, we develop a fast and accurate numerical inverse Laplace transformation algorithm, required to invert the Laplace transforms needed to evaluate $G(x,Q^2)$, and compare it to the exact solution. We obtain accuracies of less than 1 part in 1000 over the entire $x$ and $Q^2$ spectrum. Since no analytic Laplace inversion is possible for next-to-leading order (NLO) and higher orders, this numerical algorithm will enable one to obtain accurate NLO (and NNLO) gluon distributions, using only experimental measurements of $F_2^{\gamma p}(x,Q^2)$.
  • Singularities in macroscopic systems at discontinuous phase transitions are replaced in finite systems by sharp but continuous changes. Both the energy differences between metastable and stable phases and the energy barriers separating these phases decrease with decreasing particle number. Then, for small enough systems, random heterophasic oscillations of the entire system become an observable form of thermal motion. Under certain conditions, these oscillations take the form of oscillatory nucleation. We discuss mechanisms and observation conditions for these random transitions between phases.
  • A doping series of AlAs (001) quantum wells with Si delta-modulation doping on both sides reveals different dark and post-illumination saturation densities, as well as temperature dependent photoconductivity. The lower dark two-dimensional electron density saturation is explained assuming deep binding energy of Delta_DK = 65.2 meV for Si-donors in the dark. Persistent photoconductivity (PPC) is observed upon illumination, with higher saturation density indicating shallow post-illumination donor binding energy. The photoconductivity is thermally activated, with 4 K illumination requiring post-illumination annealing to T = 30 K to saturate the PPC. Dark and post-illumination doping efficiencies are reported.
  • We present the methods and preparatory work for our study of the collisional runaway scenario to form a very massive star (VMS, M > 400 Msun) at the centre of a young, compact stellar cluster. In the first phase of the process, a very dense central core of massive stars (M =~ 30-120 Msun) forms through mass segregation and gravothermal collapse. This leads to a collisional stage, likely to result in the formation of a VMS (itself a possible progenitor for an intermediate-mass black hole) through a runaway sequence of mergers between the massive stars. In this paper we present the runaway scenario in a general astrophysical context. We then explain the numerical method used to investigate it. Our approach is based on a Monte Carlo code to simulate the stellar dynamics of spherical star clusters using a very large number of particles (a few 1e5 to several 1e6). Finally, we report on test computations carried out to ensure that our implementation of the important physics is sound. In a second paper, we present results from more than 100 cluster simulations realized to determine the conditions leading to the collisional formation of a VMS and the characteristics of the runaway sequences.
  • We present a new study of the collisional runaway scenario to form an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH, MBH > 100 Msun) at the centre of a young, compact stellar cluster. The first phase is the formation of a very dense central core of massive stars (Mstar =~ 30-120 Msun) through mass segregation and gravothermal collapse. Previous work established the conditions for this to happen before the massive stars evolve off the main sequence (MS). In this and a companion paper, we investigate the next stage by implementing direct collisions between stars. Using a Monte Carlo stellar dynamics code, we follow the core collapse and subsequent collisional phase in more than 100 models with varying cluster mass, size, and initial concentration. Collisions are treated either as ideal, ``sticky-sphere'' mergers or using realistic prescriptions derived from 3-D hydrodynamics computations. In all cases for which the core collapse happens in less than the MS lifetime of massive stars (~3 Myr), we obtain the growth of a single very massive star (VMS, Mstar =~ 400-4000 Msun) through a runaway sequence of mergers. Mass loss from collisions, even for velocity dispersions as high as sigma1D ~ 1000 km/s, does not prevent the runaway. The region of cluster parameter space leading to runaway is even more extended than predicted in previous work because, in clusters with sigma1D > 300 km/s, collisions accelerate (and, in extreme cases, drive) core collapse. Although the VMS grows rapidly to > 1000 Msun in models exhibiting runaway, we cannot predict accurately its final mass. This is because the termination of the runaway process must eventually be determined by a complex interplay between stellar dynamics, hydrodynamics, and the stellar evolution of the VMS. [abridged]
  • We study the early dynamical evolution of young, dense star clusters using Monte Carlo simulations for systems with up to N~10^7 stars. Rapid mass segregation of massive main-sequence stars and the development of the Spitzer instability can drive these systems to core collapse in a small fraction of the initial half-mass relaxation time. If the core collapse time is less than the lifetime of the massive stars, all stars in the collapsing core may then undergo a runaway collision process leading to the formation of a massive black hole. Here we study in detail the first step in this process, up to the occurrence of core collapse. We have performed about 100 simulations for clusters with a wide variety of initial conditions, varying systematically the cluster density profile, stellar IMF, and number of stars. We also considered the effects of initial mass segregation and stellar evolution mass loss. Our results show that, for clusters with a moderate initial central concentration and any realistic IMF, the ratio of core collapse time to initial half-mass relaxation time is typically ~0.1, in agreement with the value previously found by direct N-body simulations for much smaller systems. Models with even higher central concentration initially, or with initial mass segregation (from star formation) have even shorter core-collapse times. Remarkably, we find that, for all realistic initial conditions, the mass of the collapsing core is always close to ~10^-3 of the total cluster mass, very similar to the observed correlation between central black hole mass and total cluster mass in a variety of environments. We discuss the implications of our results for the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters and super star clusters, ultraluminous X-ray sources, and seed black holes in proto-galactic nuclei.
  • We present the first in a series of microscopic studies of electrical transport through individual molecules with metallic contacts. We view the molecules as ``heterostructures'' composed of chemically well-defined atomic groups, and analyze the device characteristics in terms of the charge and potential response of these atomic-groups to the perturbation induced by the metal-molecule coupling and the applied electrical field, which are modeled using a first-principles based self-consistent matrix Green's function (SCMGF) method. As the first example, we examine the devices formed by attaching two benzene-based molecular radicals--phenyl dithiol (PDT) and biphenyl dithiol (BPD)--symmetrically onto two semi-infinite gold electrodes through the end sulfur atoms.
  • We investigate the effect on molecular transport due to the different structural aspects of metal-molecule interfaces. The example system chosen is the prototypical molecular device formed by sandwiching the phenyl dithiolate molecule (PDT) between two gold electrodes with different metal-molecule distance, atomic structure at the metallic surface, molecular adsorption geometry and with an additional hydrogen end atom. We find the dependence of the conductance on the metal-molecule interface structure is determined by the competition between the modified metal-molecule coupling and the corresponding modified energy level lineup at the molecular junction. The results of the detailed microscopic calculation can all be understood qualitatively from the equilibrium energy level lineup and the knowledge of the voltage drop across the molecular junction at finite bias voltages.
  • The technologically important problem of predicting Auger recombination lifetimes in semiconductors is addressed by means of a fully first--principles formalism. The calculations employ highly precise energy bands and wave functions provided by the full--potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) code based on the screened exchange local density approximation. The minority carrier Auger lifetime is determined by two closely related approaches: \emph{i}) a direct evaluation of the Auger rates within Fermi's Golden Rule, and \emph{ii}) an indirect evaluation, based on a detailed balance formulation combining Auger recombination and its inverse process, impact ionization, in a unified framework. Calculated carrier lifetimes determined with the direct and indirect methods show excellent consistency \emph{i}) between them for $n$-doped GaAs and \emph{ii}%) with measured values for GaAs and InGaAs. This demonstrates the validity and accuracy of the computational formalism for the Auger lifetime and indicates a new sensitive tool for possible use in materials performance optimization.
  • Thermodynamic effects of local structure fluctuations in glassformers are analyzed in terms of energy basins and inter-basin hopping. Depending on the time-scale of measurement, one observes short-time thermodynamic properties related to a narrow set of basins, or equilibrium properties that include structural relaxation. The inter-basin hopping is manifested by the fluctuations of the pressure, internal energy, and other thermodynamic short time characteristics. Formulas relating the inter-basin fluctuations of pressure and internal energy to the differences between the long- and short-time susceptibilities are found. Based on obtained relations, we discuss the relative sensitivity of the structure to temperature and pressure.
  • An analysis of the dynamic dielectric and electro-optic relaxation response of thin film ferroelectrics is presented. The analysis is based upon the relaxation of ferroelectric domains with a continuous distribution of sizes given by percolation theory. The resulting temporal response is described by the expression (t^-m) exp(-(t/tau)^beta). The analysis was applied to KNbO3 thin films. Measurements of the polarization, birefringence and dielectric transients show qualitative agreement with the model over 11 orders of magnitude in time.
  • The symmetry-induced magnetic anisotropy due to monoatomic steps at strained Ni films is determined using results of first - principles relativistic full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) calculations and an analogy with the N\'eel model. We show that there is a magnetoelastic anisotropy contribution to the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy energy in the vicinal plane of a stepped surface. In addition to the known spin-direction reorientation transition at a flat Ni/Cu(001) surface, we propose a spin-direction reorientation transition in the vicinal plane for a stepped Ni/Cu surface due to the magnetoelastic anisotropy. We show that with an increase of Ni film thickness, the magnetization in the vicinal plane turns perpendicular to the step edge at a critical thickness calculated to be in the range of 16-24 Ni layers for the Ni/Cu(1,1,13) stepped surface.
  • A self-homodyne detection scheme is proposed to perform two-mode tomography on a twin-beam state at the output of a nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier. This scheme has been devised to improve the matching between the local oscillator and the signal modes, which is the main limitation to the overall quantum efficiency in conventional homodyning. The feasibility of the measurement is analyzed on the basis of Monte-Carlo simulations, studying the effect of non-unit quantum efficiency on detection of the correlation and the total photon-number oscillations of the twin-beam state.
  • We present a quantum-mechanical analysis of a nonlinear interferometer that achieves optical switching via cross-phase modulation resulting from the Kerr effect. We show how it performs as a very precise optical regenerator, highly improving the transmitted bit-error rate in the presence of loss.
  • Defect-chaos is studied numerically in coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations for parametrically driven waves. The motion of the defects is traced in detail yielding their life-times, annihilation partners, and distances traveled. In a regime in which in the one-dimensional case the chaotic dynamics is due to double phase slips, the two-dimensional system exhibits a strongly ordered stripe pattern. When the parity-breaking instability to traveling waves is approached this order vanishes and the correlation function decays rapidly. In the ordered regime the defects have a typical life-time, whereas in the disordered regime the life-time distribution is exponential. The probability of large defect loops is substantially larger in the disordered regime.
  • Recent experiments on convection in binary mixtures have shown that the interaction between localized waves (pulses) can be repulsive as well as {\it attractive} and depends strongly on the relative {\it orientation} of the pulses. It is demonstrated that the concentration mode, which is characteristic of the extended Ginzburg-Landau equations introduced recently, allows a natural understanding of that result. Within the standard complex Ginzburg-Landau equation this would not be possible.