• The scattering of electromagnetic pulses is described using a non-singular boundary integral method to solve directly for the field components in the frequency domain, and Fourier transform is then used to obtain the complete space-time behavior. This approach is stable for wavelengths both small and large relative to characteristic length scales. Amplitudes and phases of field values can be obtained accurately on or near material boundaries. Local field enhancement effects due to multiple scattering of interest to applications in microphotonics are demonstrated.
  • We present a boundary integral formulation of electromagnetic scattering by homogeneous bodies that are characterized by linear constitutive equations in the frequency domain. By working with the Cartesian components of the electric, E and magnetic, H fields and with the scalar functions (r*E) and (r*H), the problem is cast as solving a set of scalar Helmholtz equations for the field components that are coupled by the usual electromagnetic boundary conditions at material boundaries. This facilitates a direct solution for E and H rather than working with surface currents as intermediate quantities in existing methods. Consequently, our formulation is free of the well-known numerical instability that occurs in the zero frequency or long wavelength limit in traditional surface integral solutions of Maxwell's equations and our numerical results converge uniformly to the static results in the long wavelength limit. Furthermore, we use a formulation of the scalar Helmholtz equation that is expressed as classically convergent integrals and does not require the evaluation of principal value integrals or any knowledge of the solid angle. Therefore, standard quadrature and higher order surface elements can readily be used to improve numerical precision. In addition, near and far field values can be calculated with equal precision and multiscale problems in which the scatterers possess characteristic length scales that are both large and small relative to the wavelength can be easily accommodated. From this we obtain results for the scattering and transmission of electromagnetic waves at dielectric boundaries that are valid for any ratio of the local surface curvature to the wave number. This is a generalization of the familiar Fresnel formula and Snell's law, valid at planar dielectric boundaries, for the scattering and transmission of electromagnetic waves at surfaces of arbitrary curvature.
  • A boundary integral formulation of electromagnetics that involves only the components of $\boldsymbol{E}$ and $\boldsymbol{H}$ is derived without the use of surface currents that appear in the classical PMCHWT formulation. The kernels of the boundary integral equations for $\boldsymbol{E}$ and $\boldsymbol{H}$ are non-singular so that all field quantities at the surface can be determined to high precision and also geometries with closely spaced surfaces present no numerical difficulties. Quadratic elements can readily be used to represent the surfaces so that the surface integrals can be calculated to higher numerical precision than using planar elements for the same numbers of degrees of freedom.
  • The general space-time evolution of the scattering of an incident acoustic plane wave pulse by an arbitrary configuration of targets is treated by employing a recently developed non-singular boundary integral method to solve the Helmholtz equation in the frequency domain from which the fast Fourier transform is used to obtain the full space-time solution of the wave equation. The non-singular boundary integral solution can enforce the radiation boundary condition at infinity exactly and can account for multiple scattering effects at all spacings between scatterers without adverse effects on the numerical precision. More generally, the absence of singular kernels in the non-singular integral equation confers high numerical stability and precision for smaller numbers of degrees of freedom. The use of fast Fourier transform to obtain the time dependence is not constrained to discrete time steps and is particularly efficient for studying the response to different incident pulses by the same configuration of scatterers. The precision that can be attained using a smaller number of Fourier components is also quantified.
  • A model has been developed to describe the collision and possible coalescence of two driven deformable drops in the Hele-Shaw cell. The interdependence between hydrodynamic effects and interfacial deformations is characterised by a film capillary number: Ca_f = (\mu v/\sigma)(R_o/h_o)^(3/2) as revealed by an analytic perturbation solution of the governing equations for a system with continuous phase viscosity \mu, interfacial tension \sigma, drop radius R_o, characteristic relative velocity v and separation h_o between the drops. Numerical solutions of the model demonstrate the importance of the full dynamic history of the interacting drops in determining stability or coalescence. The geometry of the Hele-Shaw cell allows for the possibility of using the model to infer the time dependent force between colliding drops by measuring their separation.
  • The ability of soft matter such as drops and bubbles to change shape dynamically during interaction can give rise to counter-intuitive behaviour that may be expected of rigid materials. Here we show that dimple formation on approach and the possibility of coalescence on separation of proximal drops in relative motion are examples of this general dynamic behaviour of soft matter that arise from the coupling between hydrodynamic forces and geometric deformations. The key parameter is a film capillary number Caf = (muVo/sigma)(R/Ho)2 that depends on viscosity mu, interfacial tension sigma, the Laplace radius R, characteristic film thickness Ho and velocity Vo.