• We discuss the optical loading of a Bose-Einstein condensate in the Thomas-Fermi regime. The condensate is loaded via spontaneous emission from a reservoir of excited-state atoms. By means of a master equation formalism, we discuss the modification of the condensate temperature during the loading. We identify the threshold temperature, $T_{th}$, above (below) which the loading process leads to cooling (heating), respectively. The consequences of our analysis for the continuous loading of an atom laser are discussed.
  • We review our version of the classical field approximation to the dynamics of a finite temperature Bose gas. In the case of a periodic box potential, we investigate the role of the high momentum cut-off, essential in the method. In particular, we show that the cut-off going to infinity limit decribes the particle number going to infinity with the scattering length going to zero. In this weak interaction limit, the relative population of the condensate tends to unity. We also show that the cross-over energy, at which the probability distribution of the condensate occupation changes its character, grows with a growing scattering length. In the more physical case of the condensate in the harmonic trap we investigate the dissipative dynamics of a vortex. We compare the decay time and the velocities of the vortex with the available analytic estimates.
  • We study the optical loading of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate by spontaneous emission of atoms in excited electronic state in the Boson-Accumulation Regime. We generalize the previous simplified analysis of ref. [Phys. Rev. A 53, 2466 (1996)], to a 3D case in which more than one trap level of the excited state trap is considered. By solving the corresponding quantum many-body master equation, we demonstrate that also for this general situation the photon reabsorption can help to increase the condensate fraction. Such effect could be employed to realize a continuous atom laser, and to overcome condensate losses.
  • The continuous pumping of atoms into a Bose-Einstein condensate via spontaneous emission from a thermal reservoir is analyzed. We consider the case of atoms with a three-level $\Lambda$ scheme, in which one of the atomic transitions has a very much shorter life-time than the other one. We found that in such scenario the photon reabsorption in dense clouds can be considered negligible. If in addition inelastic processes can be neglected, we find that optical pumping can be used to continuously load and refill Bose-Einstein condensates, i.e. provides a possible way to achieve a continuous atom laser.