• Based on phase-resolved broadband spectroscopy using $XMM$-$Newton$ and $NuSTAR$, we report on a potential cyclotron resonant scattering feature at $E \sim 13$ keV in the pulsed spectrum of the recently discoverd ULX pulsar NGC 300 ULX1. If this interpretation is correct, the implied magnetic field of the central neutron star is $B \sim 10^{12}$ G (assuming scattering off electrons), similar to that estimated from the observed spin-up of the star, and also similar to known Galactic X-ray pulsars. We discuss the implications of this result for the connection between NGC 300 ULX1 and the other known ULX pulsars, particularly in light of the recent discovery of a likely proton Cyclotron line in another ULX, M51 ULX-8.
  • We present broadband X-ray analyses of a sample of bright ultraluminous X-ray sources with the goal of investigating the spectral similarity of this population to the known ULX pulsars, M82 X-2, NGC7793 P13 and NGC5907 ULX. We perform a phase-resolved analysis of the broadband XMM-Newton+NuSTAR dataset of NGC5907 ULX, finding that the pulsed emission from the accretion column in this source exhibits a similar spectral shape to that seen in both M82 X-2 and NGC7793 P13, and that this is responsible for the excess emission observed at the highest energies when the spectra are fit with accretion disk models. We then demonstrate that similar 'hard' excesses are seen in all the ULXs in the broadband sample. Finally, for the ULXs where the nature of the accretor is currently unknown, we test whether the hard excesses are all consistent with being produced by an accretion column similar to those present in M82 X-2, NGC7793 P13 and NGC5907 ULX. Based on the average shape of the pulsed emission, we find that in all cases a similar accretion column can successfully reproduce the observed data, consistent with the hypothesis that this ULX sample may be dominated by neutron star accretors. Compared to the known pulsar ULXs, our spectral fits for the remaining ULXs suggest that the non-pulsed emission from the accretion flow beyond the magnetosphere makes a stronger relative contribution than the component associated with the accretion column. If these sources do also contain neutron star accretors, this may help to explain the lack of detected pulsations.
  • The presence of neutron stars in at least three ultraluminous X-ray sources is now firmly established and offers an unambiguous view of super-critical accretion. All three systems show long-timescale periods (60-80 days) in the X-rays and/or optical, two of which are known to be super-orbital in nature. Should the flow be classically super critical, i.e. the Eddington limit is reached locally in the disc (implying surface dipole fields that are sub-magnetar in strength), then the large scale-height flow can precess through the Lense-Thirring effect which could provide an explanation for the observed super-orbital periods. By connecting the details of the Lense-Thirring effect with the observed pulsar spin period, we are able to infer the moment-of-inertia and therefore equation-of-state of the neutron star without relying on the inclination of, or distance to the system. We apply our technique to the case of NGC 7793 P13 and demonstrate that stronger magnetic fields imply stiffer equations of state. We discuss the caveats and uncertainties, many of which can be addressed through forthcoming radiative magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations and their connection to observation.
  • Whilst astronomy as a science is historically founded on observations at optical wavelengths, studying the Universe in other bands has yielded remarkable discoveries, from pulsars in the radio, signatures of the Big Bang at submm wavelengths, through to high energy emission from accreting, gravitationally-compact objects and the discovery of gamma-ray bursts. Unsurprisingly, the result of combining multiple wavebands leads to an enormous increase in diagnostic power, but powerful insights can be lost when the sources studied vary on timescales shorter than the temporal separation between observations in different bands. In July 2015, the workshop "Paving the way to simultaneous multi-wavelength astronomy" was held as a concerted effort to address this at the Lorentz Center, Leiden. It was attended by 50 astronomers from diverse fields as well as the directors and staff of observatories and spaced-based missions. This community white paper has been written with the goal of disseminating the findings of that workshop by providing a concise review of the field of multi-wavelength astronomy covering a wide range of important source classes, the problems associated with their study and the solutions we believe need to be implemented for the future of observational astronomy. We hope that this paper will both stimulate further discussion and raise overall awareness within the community of the issues faced in a developing, important field.
  • The Be X-ray binary EXO 2030+375 was in an extended low luminosity state during most of 2016. We observed this state with NuSTAR and Swift, supported by INTEGRAL observations as well as optical spectroscopy with the NOT. We present a comprehensive spectral and timing analysis of these data here to study the accretion geometry and investigate a possible onset of the propeller effect. The H-alpha data show that the circumstellar disk of the Be-star is still present. We measure equivalent widths similar to values found during more active phases in the past, indicating that the low-luminosity state is not simply triggered by a smaller Be disk. The NuSTAR data, taken at a 3-78 keV luminosity of ~6.8e35 erg/s (for a distance of 7.1 kpc), are well described by standard accreting pulsar models, such as an absorbed power-law with a high-energy cutoff. We find that pulsations are still clearly visible at these luminosities, indicating that accretion is continuing despite the very low mass transfer rate. In phase-resolved spectroscopy we find a peculiar variation of the photon index from ~1.5 to ~2.5 over only about 3% of the rotational period. This variation is similar to that observed with XMM-Newton at much higher luminosities. It may be connected to the accretion column passing through our line of sight. With Swift/XRT we observe luminosities as low as 1e34 erg/s during which the data quality did not allow us to search for pulsations, but the spectrum is much softer and well described by either a blackbody or soft power-law continuum. This softer spectrum might be due to the fact that accretion has been stopped by the propeller effect and we only observe the neutron star surface cooling.
  • We present results from a coordinated $XMM$-$Newton$+$NuSTAR$ observation of the type 1.8 Seyfert galaxy IRAS 13197-1627. This is a highly complex source, with strong contributions from relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk, neutral absorption and further reprocessing by more distant material, and ionised absorption from an outflow. We undertake a detailed spectral analysis combining the broadband coverage provided by $XMM$-$Newton$+$NuSTAR$ with a multi-epoch approach incorporating archival observations performed by $XMM$-$Newton$ and $Suzaku$. Our focus is on characterising the reflection from the inner accretion disk, which previous works have suggested may dominate the AGN emission, and constraining the black hole spin. Using lamppost disk reflection models, we find that the results for the inner disk are largely insensitive to assumptions regarding the geometry of the distant reprocessor and the precise form of the illuminating X-ray continuum. However, these results do depend on the treatment of the iron abundance of the distant absorber/reprocessor. The multi-epoch data favour a scenario in which the AGN is chemically homogeneous, and we find that a rapidly rotating black hole is preferred, with $a^* \geq 0.7$, but a slowly-rotating black hole is not strongly excluded. In addition to the results for the inner disk, we also find that both the neutral and ionised absorbers vary from epoch to epoch, implying that both have some degree of inhomogeneity in their structure.
  • We present a detailed, broadband X-ray spectral analysis of the ULX pulsar NGC 7793 P13, a known super-Eddington source, utilizing data from the $XMM$-$Newton$, $NuSTAR$ and $Chandra$ observatories. The broadband $XMM$-$Newton+NuSTAR$ spectrum of P13 is qualitatively similar to the rest of the ULX sample with broadband coverage, suggesting that additional ULXs in the known population may host neutron star accretors. Through time-averaged, phase-resolved and multi-epoch studies, we find that two non-pulsed thermal blackbody components with temperatures $\sim$0.5 and $\sim$1.5 keV are required to fit the data below 10 keV, in addition to a third continuum component which extends to higher energies and is associated with the pulsed emission from the accretion column. The characteristic radii of the thermal components appear to be similar, and are too large to be associated with the neutron star itself, so the need for two components likely indicates the accretion flow outside the magnetosphere is complex. We suggest a scenario in which the thick inner disc expected for super-Eddington accretion begins to form, but is terminated by the neutron star's magnetic field soon after its onset, implying a magnetic field of $B \lesssim 6 \times 10^{12}$ G for the central neutron star. Evidence of similar termination of the disc in other sources may offer a further means of identifying additional neutron star ULXs. Finally, we examine the spectrum exhibited by P13 during one of its unusual 'off' states. These data require both a hard powerlaw component, suggesting residual accretion onto the neutron star, and emission from a thermal plasma, which we argue is likely associated with the P13 system.
  • We present results from four new broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 ($L_{\rm{X}} > 10^{40}$ erg/s), performed by $Suzaku$ and $NuSTAR$ in coordination. Combined with the archival data, we now have broadband observations of this remarkable source from six separate epochs. Two of these new observations probe lower fluxes than seen previously, allowing us to extend our knowledge of the broadband spectral variability exhibited. The spectra are well fit by two thermal blackbody components, which dominate the emission below 10 keV, as well as a steep ($\Gamma \sim 3.5$) powerlaw tail which dominates above $\sim$15 keV. Remarkably, while the 0.3-10.0 keV flux varies by a factor of $\sim$3 between all these epochs, the 15-40 keV flux varies by only $\sim$20%. Although the spectral variability is strongest in the $\sim$1-10 keV band, both of the thermal components are required to vary when all epochs are considered. We also re-visit the search for iron absorption features, leveraging the high-energy $NuSTAR$ data to improve our sensitivity to extreme velocity outflows in light of the ultra-fast outflow recently detected in NGC 1313 X-1. Iron absorption from a similar outflow along our line of sight can be ruled out in this case. We discuss these results in the context of super-Eddington accretion models that invoke a funnel-like geometry for the inner flow, and propose a scenario in which we have an almost face-on view of a funnel that expands to larger radii with increasing flux, resulting in an increasing degree of geometrical collimation for the emission from intermediate temperature regions.
  • We present first results from a series of $NuSTAR$ observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg obtained during its summer 2015 outburst, primarily focusing on observations during the height of this outburst activity. The $NuSTAR$ data show extreme variability in both the flux and spectral properties of the source. This is partly driven by strong and variable line-of-sight absorption, similar to previous outbursts. The latter stages of this observation are dominated by strong flares, reaching luminosities close to Eddington. During these flares, the central source appears to be relatively unobscured and the data show clear evidence for a strong contribution from relativistic reflection, providing a means to probe the geometry of the innermost accretion flow. Based on the flare properties, analogy with other Galactic black hole binaries, and also the simultaneous onset of radio activity, we argue that this intense X-ray flaring is related to transient jet activity during which the ejected plasma is the primary source of illumination for the accretion disk. If this is the case, then our reflection modelling implies that these jets are launched in close proximity to the black hole (as close as a few gravitational radii), consistent with expectations for jet launching models that tap either the spin of the central black hole, or the very innermost accretion disk. Our analysis also allows us to place the first constraints on the black hole spin for this source, which we find to be $a^* > 0.92$ (99% statistical uncertainty, based on an idealized lamppost geometry).
  • We discuss the broadband X-ray spectrum of GRS 1734-292 obtained from non-simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations, performed in 2009 and 2014, respectively. GRS1734-292 is a Seyfert 1 galaxy, located near the Galactic plane at $z=0.0214$. The NuSTAR spectrum ($3-80$ keV) is dominated by a primary power-law continuum with $\Gamma=1.65 \pm 0.05$ and a high-energy cutoff $E_c=53^{+11}_{-8}$ keV, one of the lowest measured by NuSTAR in a Seyfert galaxy. Comptonization models show a temperature of the coronal plasma of $kT_e=11.9^{+1.2}_{-0.9}$ keV and an optical depth, assuming a slab geometry, $\tau=2.98^{+0.16}_{-0.19}$ or a similar temperature and $\tau=6.7^{+0.3}_{-0.4}$ assuming a spherical geometry. The 2009 XMM-Newton spectrum is well described by a flatter intrinsic continuum ($\Gamma=1.47^{+0.07}_{-0.03}$) and one absorption line due to Fe\textsc{XXV} K$\alpha$ produced by a warm absorber. Both data sets show a modest iron K$\alpha$ emission line at $6.4$ keV and the associated Compton reflection, due to reprocessing from neutral circumnuclear material.
  • We report the detection of coherent pulsations from the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 7793 P13. The ~0.42s nearly sinusoidal pulsations were initially discovered in broadband X-ray observations using XMM-Newton and NuSTAR taken in 2016. We subsequently also found pulsations in archival XMM-Newton data taken in 2013 and 2014. The significant (>>5 sigma) detection of coherent pulsations demonstrates that the compact object in P13 is a neutron star with an observed peak luminosity of ~1e40 erg/s (assuming isotropy), well above the Eddington limit for a 1.4 M_sun accretor. This makes P13 the second ultraluminous X-ray source known to be powered by an accreting neutron star. The pulse period varies between epochs, with a slow but persistent spin up over the 2013-2016 period. This spin-up indicates a magnetic field of B ~ 1.5e12 G, typical of many accreting pulsars. The most likely explanation for the extreme luminosity is a high degree of beaming, however this is difficult to reconcile with the sinusoidal pulse profile.
  • We present broad-band, multi-epoch X-ray spectroscopy of the pulsating ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in NGC 5907. Simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR data from 2014 are best described by a multi-color black-body model with a temperature gradient as a function of accretion disk radius significantly flatter than expected for a standard thin accretion disk (T(r) ~ r^{-p}, with p=0.608^{+0.014}_{-0.012}). Additionally, we detect a hard power-law tail at energies above 10 keV, which we interpret as being due to Comptonization. We compare this observation to archival XMM-Newton, Chandra, and NuSTAR data from 2003, 2012, and 2013, and investigate possible spectral changes as a function of phase over the 78d super-orbital period of this source. We find that observations taken around phases 0.3-0.4 show very similar temperature profiles, even though the observed flux varies significantly, while one observation taken around phase 0 has a significantly steeper profile. We discuss these findings in light of the recent discovery that the compact object is a neutron star and show that precession of the accretion disk or the neutron star can self-consistently explain most observed phenomena.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the accreting transient black hole GRS 1739-278 during a very faint low hard state at ~0.02% of the Eddington luminosity (for a distance of 8.5 kpc and a mass of 10 M_sun ). The broad-band X-ray spectrum between 0.5-60 keV can be well-described by a power law continuum with an exponential cutoff. The continuum is unusually hard for such a low luminosity, with a photon index of Gamma = 1.39 +/- 0.04. We find evidence for an additional reflection component from an optically thick accretion disk at the 98% likelihood level. The reflection fraction is low with R_refl = 0.043(+0.033,-0.023). In combination with measurements of the spin and inclination parameters made with NuSTAR during a brighter hard state by Miller and co-workers, we seek to constrain the accretion disk geometry. Depending on the assumed emissivity profile of the accretion disk, we find a truncation radius of 15-35 Rg (5-12 R_ISCO ) at the 90% confidence limit. These values depend strongly on the assumptions and we discuss possible systematic uncertainties.
  • We report the detection of a $78.1\pm0.5$ day period in the X-ray lightcurve of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5907 ULX1 ($L_{\rm{X,peak}}\sim5\times10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$), discovered during an extensive monitoring program with Swift. These periodic variations are strong, with the observed flux changing by a factor of $\sim$3-4 between the peaks and the troughs of the cycle; our simulations suggest that the observed periodicity is detected comfortably in excess of 3$\sigma$ significance. We discuss possible origins for this X-ray period, but conclude that at the current time we cannot robustly distinguish between orbital and super-orbital variations.
  • We present an analysis of NuSTAR observations of a hard intermediate state of the transient black hole GX 339-4 taken in January 2015. As the source softened significantly over the course of the 1.3 d-long observation we split the data into 21 sub-sets and find that the spectrum of all of them can be well described by a power-law continuum with an additional relativistically blurred reflection component. The photon index increases from ~1.69 to ~1.77 over the course of the observation. The accretion disk is truncated at around 9 gravitational radii in all spectra. We also perform timing analysis on the same 21 individual data sets, and find a strong type-C quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO), which increase in frequency from ~0.68 to ~1.05 Hz with time. The frequency change is well correlated with the softening of the spectrum. We discuss possible scenarios for the production of the QPO and calculate predicted inner radii in the relativistic precession model as well as the global disk mode oscillations model. We find discrepancies with respect to the observed values in both models unless we allow for a black hole mass of ~100 M_sun , which is highly unlikely. We discuss possible systematic uncertainties, in particular with the measurement of the inner accretion disk radius in the relativistic reflection model. We conclude that the combination of observed QPO frequencies and inner accretion disk radii, as obtained from spectral fitting, is difficult to reconcile with current models.
  • We present the detection of an absorpton feature at $E=8.77^{+0.05}_{-0.06}$ keV in the combined X-ray spectrum of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 1313 X-1 observed with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR, significant at the 3$\sigma$ level. If associated with blueshifted ionized iron, the implied outflow velocity is ~0.2$c$ for Fe XXVI, or ~0.25$c$ for Fe XXV. These velocities are similar to the ultrafast outflow seen in absorption recently discovered in this source at lower energies by XMM-Newton, and we therefore conclude that this is an iron component to the same outflow. Photoionization modeling marginally prefers the Fe XXV solution, but in either case the outflow properties appear to be extreme, potentially supporting a super-Eddington hypothesis for NGC 1313 X-1.
  • We present a multi-epoch hard X-ray analysis of Cygnus X-1 in its soft state based on four observations with NuSTAR. Despite the basic similarity of the observed spectra, there is clear spectral variability between epochs. To investigate this variability, we construct a model incorporating both the standard disk-corona continuum and relativistic reflection from the accretion disk, based on prior NuSTAR work on Cygnus X-1, and apply this model to each epoch independently. We find excellent consistency for the black hole spin, and the iron abundance of the accretion disk, which are expected to remain constant on observational timescales. In particular, we confirm that Cygnus X-1 hosts a rapidly rotating black hole, 0.93<a*<0.96, in broad agreement with the majority of prior studies of the relativistic disk reflection and constraints on the spin obtained through studies of the thermal accretion disk continuum. Our work also confirms the apparent misalignment between the inner disk and the orbital plane of the binary system reported previously, finding the magnitude of this warp to be ~10-15deg. This level of misalignment does not significantly change (and may even improve) the agreement between our reflection results and the thermal continuum results regarding the black hole spin. The spectral variability observed by NuSTAR is dominated by the primary continuum, implying variability in the temperature of the scattering electron plasma. Finally, we consistently observe absorption from ionized iron at ~6.7 keV, which varies in strength as a function of orbital phase in a manner consistent with the absorbing material being an ionized phase of the focused stellar wind from the supergiant companion star.
  • We present results from spectral fitting of the very high state of GX~339-4 with NuSTAR and Swift. We use relativistic reflection modelling to measure the spin of the black hole and inclination of the inner disk, and find a spin of $a=0.95^{+0.02}_{-0.08}$ and inclination of $30${\deg}$\pm1$ (statistical errors). These values agree well with previous results from reflection modelling. With the exceptional sensitivity of NuSTAR at the high-energy side of the disk spectrum, we are able to constrain multiple physical parameters simultaneously using continuum fitting. By using the constraints from reflection as input for the continuum fitting method, we invert the conventional fitting procedure to estimate the mass and distance of GX~339-4 using just the X-ray spectrum, finding a mass of $9.0^{+1.6}_{-1.2}M_\odot$ and distance of $8.4\pm0.9$ kpc (statistical errors).
  • We present simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations spanning 3-78 keV of the nearest radio galaxy, Centaurus A (Cen A). The accretion geometry around the central engine in Cen A is still debated, and we investigate possible configurations using detailed X-ray spectral modeling. NuSTAR imaged the central region of Cen A with sub-arcminute resolution at X-ray energies above 10 keV for the first time, but finds no evidence for an extended source or other off-nuclear point-sources. The XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectra agree well and can be described with an absorbed power-law with a photon index {\Gamma} = 1.815 +/- 0.005 and a fluorescent Fe K{\alpha} line in good agreement with literature values. The spectrum does not require a high-energy exponential rollover, with a constraint of E_fold > 1 MeV. A thermal Comptonization continuum describes the data well, with parameters that agree with values measured by INTEGRAL, in particular an electron temperature kTe between ~100-300 keV, seed photon input temperatures between 5-50 eV. We do not find evidence for reflection or a broad iron line and put stringent upper limits of R < 0.01 on the reflection fraction and accretion disk illumination. We use archival Chandra data to estimate the contribution from diffuse emission, extra-nuclear point-sources, and the outer X-ray jet to the observed NuSTAR and XMM-Newton X-ray spectra and find the contribution to be negligible. We discuss different scenarios for the physical origin of the observed hard X-ray spectrum, and conclude that the inner disk is replaced by an advection-dominated accretion flow or that the X-rays are dominated by synchrotron self-Compton emission from the inner regions of the radio jet or a combination thereof.
  • We present the results from coordinated X-ray observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5204 X-1 performed by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton in early 2013. These observations provide the first detection of NGC 5204 X-1 above 10 keV, extending the broadband coverage to 0.3-20 keV. The observations were carried out in two epochs separated by approximately 10 days, and showed little spectral variation, with an observed luminosity of Lx = (4.95+/-0.11)e39 erg/s. The broadband spectrum confirms the presence of a clear spectral downturn above 10 keV seen in some previous observations. This cutoff is inconsistent with the standard low/hard state seen in Galactic black hole binaries, as would be expected from an intermediate mass black hole accreting at significantly sub-Eddington rates given the observed luminosity. The continuum is apparently dominated by two optically thick thermal-like components, potentially accompanied by a faint high energy tail. The broadband spectrum is likely associated with an accretion disk that differs from a standard Shakura & Sunyaev thin disk.
  • We present spectral analysis of five NuSTAR and Swift observations of GX 339-4 taken during a failed outburst in summer 2013. These observations cover Eddington luminosity fractions in the range ~0.9-6%. Throughout this outburst, GX 339-4 stayed in the hard state, and all five observations show similar X-ray spectra with a hard power-law with a photon index near 1.6 and significant contribution from reflection. Using simple reflection models we find unrealistically high iron abundances. Allowing for different photon indices for the continuum incident on the reflector relative to the underlying observed continuum results in a statistically better fit and reduced iron abundances. With a photon index around 1.3, the input power-law on the reflector is significantly harder than that which is directly observed. We study the influence of different emissivity profiles and geometries and consistently find an improvement when using separate photon indices. The inferred inner accretion disk radius is strongly model dependent, but we do not find evidence for a truncation radius larger than 100 r_g in any model. The data do not allow independent spin constraints but the results are consistent with the literature (i.e., a>0). Our best-fit models indicate an inclination angle in the range 40-60 degrees, consistent with limits on the orbital inclination but higher than reported in the literature using standard reflection models. The iron line around 6.4 keV is clearly broadened, and we detect a superimposed narrow core as well. This core originates from a fluorescence region outside the influence of the strong gravity of the black hole and we discuss possible geometries.
  • We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broad-band spectra in unprecedented detail. We confirm that the iron line cannot be fit with a combination of narrow lines and absorption features, and instead requires a relativistically blurred profile in combination with a narrow line and absorption from the companion wind. We use the reflection models of Garcia et al. (2014) to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low source height, and rule out truncation to greater than three gravitational radii at the 3{\sigma} confidence level. In addition, we find that the line profile has not changed greatly in the switch from soft to hard states, and that the differences are consistent with changes in the underlying reflection spectrum rather than the relativistic blurring. We find that the blurring parameters are consistent when fitting either just the iron line or the entire broad-band spectrum, which is well modelled with a Comptonized continuum plus reflection model.
  • We present spectral analysis of NuSTAR and Swift observations of Cep X-4 during its outburst in 2014. We observed the source once during the peak of the outburst and once during the decay, finding good agreement in the spectral shape between the observations. We describe the continuum using a powerlaw with a Fermi-Dirac cutoff at high energies. Cep X-4 has a very strong cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) around 30 keV. A simple absorption-like line with a Gaussian optical depth or a pseudo-Lorentzian profile both fail to describe the shape of the CRSF accurately, leaving significant deviations at the red side of the line. We characterize this asymmetry with a second absorption feature around 19 keV. The line energy of the CRSF, which is not influenced by the addition of this feature, shows a small but significant positive luminosity dependence. With luminosities between (1-6)e36 erg/s, Cep X-4 is below the theoretical limit where such a correlation is expected. This behavior is similar to Vela X-1 and we discuss parallels between the two systems.
  • We present X-ray timing and spectral analyses of simultaneous 150 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. We disentangle the continuum emission, absorption, and reflection properties of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) by applying inner accretion disk reflection and absorption-dominated models. With a time-averaged spectral analysis, we find strong evidence for relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find that relativistic emission arises from a highly ionized inner accretion disk with a steep emissivity profile, which suggests an intense, compact illuminating source. We find a preliminary, near-maximal black hole spin a>0.9 accounting for statistical and systematic modeling errors. We find a relatively moderate reflection fraction with respect to predictions for the lamp post geometry, in which the illuminating corona is modeled as a point source. Through a time-resolved spectral analysis, we find that modest coronal and inner disk reflection flux variation drives the spectral variability during the observations. We discuss various physical scenarios for the inner disk reflection model, and we find that a compact corona is consistent with the observed features.
  • We present the first broadband 0.3-25.0 kev X-ray observations of the bright ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg II X-1, performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Suzaku in September 2013. The NuSTAR data provide the first observations of Holmberg II X-1 above 10 keV, and reveal a very steep high-energy spectrum, similar to other ULXs observed by NuSTAR to date. These observations further demonstrate that ULXs exhibit spectral states that are not typically seen in Galactic black hole binaries. Comparison with other sources implies that Holmberg II X-1 accretes at a high fraction of its Eddington accretion rate, and possibly exceeds it. The soft X-ray spectrum (E<10 keV) appears to be dominated by two blackbody-like emission components, the hotter of which may be associated with an accretion disk. However, all simple disk models under-predict the NuSTAR data above ~10 keV and require an additional emission component at the highest energies probed, implying the NuSTAR data does not fall away with a Wien spectrum. We investigate physical origins for such an additional high-energy emission component, and favor a scenario in which the excess arises from Compton scattering in a hot corona of electrons with some properties similar to the very-high state seen in Galactic binaries. The observed broadband 0.3-25.0 keV luminosity inferred from these epochs is Lx = (8.1+/-0.1)e39 erg/s, typical for Holmberg II X-1, with the majority of the flux (~90%) emitted below 10 keV.