• We study the non-perturbative stability of the Large Volume Scenario (LVS) of IIB string compactifications, by analysing transitions mediated by the Brown-Teitelboim (BT) brane nucleations and by Coleman De Luccia tunneling (CDL). We find that, as long as the effective field theory description holds, the LVS AdS minima are stable despite being non-supersymmetric. This opens the possibility of having a CFT dual. Metastable de Sitter vacua behave differently depending on the uplifting mechanism. We find explicit expressions for the different decay rates in terms of exponentials of the volume. Among the transitions of dS to dS those with increasing volume and decreasing vacuum energy are preferred, though dS decays to AdS (big-crunch sinks) have higher probability. However, the probability of transitions via the CDL mechanism to decompactification are exponentially much larger compared to these. The BT decays correspond to flux/D3 brane transitions mediated by the nucleation of D5/NS5 branes. We compare our results with previous analysis for KKLT, type IIA, and 6D Einstein-Maxwell studies. In particular we find no indication for a bubble of nothing decay.
  • Successful inflationary models should (i) describe the data well; (ii) arise generically from sensible UV completions; (iii) be insensitive to detailed fine-tunings of parameters and (iv) make interesting new predictions. We argue that a class of models with these properties is characterized by relatively simple potentials with a constant term and negative exponentials. We here continue earlier work exploring UV completions for these models, including the key (though often ignored) issue of modulus stabilisation, to assess the robustness of their predictions. We show that string models where the inflaton is a fibration modulus seem to be robust due to an effective rescaling symmetry, and fairly generic since most known Calabi-Yau manifolds are fibrations. This class of models is characterized by a generic relation between the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ and the spectral index $n_s$ of the form $r \propto (n_s -1)^2$ where the proportionality constant depends on the nature of the effects used to develop the inflationary potential and the topology of the internal space. In particular we find that the largest values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio that can be obtained by generalizing the original set-up are of order $r \lesssim 0.01$. We contrast this general picture with specific popular models, such as the Starobinsky scenario and $\alpha$-attractors. Finally, we argue the self consistency of large-field inflationary models can strongly constrain non-supersymmetric inflationary mechanisms.
  • The 100+ free parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) make it computationally difficult to compare systematically with data, motivating the study of specific parameter reductions such as the cMSSM and pMSSM. Here we instead study the reductions of parameter space implied by using minimal flavour violation (MFV) to organise the R-parity conserving MSSM, with a view towards systematically building in constraints on flavour-violating physics. Within this framework the space of parameters is reduced by expanding soft supersymmetry-breaking terms in powers of the Cabibbo angle, leading to a 24-, 30- or 42-parameter framework (which we call MSSM-24, MSSM-30, and MSSM-42 respectively), depending on the order kept in the expansion. We provide a Bayesian global fit to data of the MSSM-30 parameter set to show that this is manageable with current tools. We compare the MFV reductions to the 19-parameter pMSSM choice and show that the pMSSM is not contained as a subset. The MSSM-30 analysis favours a relatively lighter TeV-scale pseudoscalar Higgs boson and $\tan \beta \sim 10$ with multi-TeV sparticles.
  • We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset $G/H$ (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple {\em large-field} power laws (like $V \propto \phi^2$) and exponential potentials, $V(\phi) = \sum_{k} V_k \; e^{-k \phi/M}$. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large $r$ through the limit $|\eta| \ll \epsilon$ and so predict $r \simeq \frac83(1-n_s)$; consequently $n_s \simeq 0.96$ gives $r \simeq 0.11$ but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on $r$ and $n_s$ improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.
  • We briefly summarize the impact of the recent Planck measurements for string inflationary models, and outline what might be expected to be learned in the near future from the expected improvement in sensitivity to the primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio. We comment on whether these models provide sufficient added value to compensate for their complexity, and ask how they fare in the face of the new constraints on non-gaussianity and dark radiation. We argue that as a group the predictions made before Planck agree well with what has been seen, and draw conclusions from this about what is likely to mean as sensitivity to primordial gravitational waves improves.
  • We survey the phenomenological constraints on abelian gauge bosons having masses in the MeV to multi-GeV mass range (using precision electroweak measurements, neutrino-electron and neutrino-nucleon scattering, electron and muon anomalous magnetic moments, upsilon decay, beam dump experiments, atomic parity violation, low-energy neutron scattering and primordial nucleosynthesis). We compute their implications for the three parameters that in general describe the low-energy properties of such bosons: their mass and their two possible types of dimensionless couplings (direct couplings to ordinary fermions and kinetic mixing with Standard Model hypercharge). We argue that gauge bosons with very small couplings to ordinary fermions in this mass range are natural in string compactifications and are likely to be generic in theories for which the gravity scale is systematically smaller than the Planck mass - such as in extra-dimensional models - because of the necessity to suppress proton decay. Furthermore, because its couplings are weak, in the low-energy theory relevant to experiments at and below TeV scales the charge gauged by the new boson can appear to be broken, both by classical effects and by anomalies. In particular, if the new gauge charge appears to be anomalous, anomaly cancellation does not also require the introduction of new light fermions in the low-energy theory. Furthermore, the charge can appear to be conserved in the low-energy theory, despite the corresponding gauge boson having a mass. Our results reduce to those of other authors in the special cases where there is no kinetic mixing or there is no direct coupling to ordinary fermions, such as for recently proposed dark-matter scenarios.
  • We introduce a simple string model of inflation, in which the inflaton field can take trans-Planckian values while driving a period of slow-roll inflation. This leads naturally to a realisation of large field inflation, inasmuch as the inflationary epoch is well described by the single-field scalar potential $V = V_0 (3-4 e^{-\hat\varphi/\sqrt{3}})$. Remarkably, for a broad class of vacua all adjustable parameters enter only through the overall coefficient $V_0$, and in particular do not enter into the slow-roll parameters. Consequently these are determined purely by the number of \e-foldings, $N_e$, and so are not independent: $\varepsilon \simeq \frac32 \eta^2$. This implies similar relations among observables like the primordial scalar-to-tensor amplitude, $r$, and the scalar spectral tilt, $n_s$: $r \simeq 6(n_s - 1)^2$. $N_e$ is itself more model-dependent since it depends partly on the post-inflationary reheat history. In a simple reheating scenario a reheating temperature of $T_{rh}\simeq 10^{9}$ GeV gives $N_e\simeq 58$, corresponding to $n_s\simeq 0.970$ and $r\simeq 0.005$, within reach of future observations. The model is an example of a class that arises naturally in the context of type IIB string compactifications with large-volume moduli stabilisation, and takes advantage of the generic existence there of Kahler moduli whose dominant appearance in the scalar potential arises from string loop corrections to the Kahler potential. The inflaton field is a combination of Kahler moduli of a K3-fibered Calabi-Yau manifold. We believe there are likely to be a great number of models in this class -- `high-fibre models' -- in which the inflaton starts off far enough up the fibre to produce observably large primordial gravity waves.
  • We consider a novel scenario for modulus stabilisation in IIB string compactifications in which the Kahler moduli are stabilised by a general set-up with two kinds of non-perturbative effects: (i) standard Kahler moduli-dependent non-perturbative effects from gaugino condensation on D7-branes or E3-instantons wrapping four-cycles in the geometric regime; (ii) dilaton-dependent non-perturbative effects from gaugino condensation on space-time filling D3-branes or E(-1)-instantons at singularities. For the LARGE Volume Scenario (LVS), the new dilaton-dependent non-perturbative effects provide a positive definite contribution to the scalar potential that can be arbitrarily tuned from fluxes to give rise to de Sitter vacua. Contrary to anti D3-branes at warped throats, this term arises from a manifestly supersymmetric effective action. In this new scenario the "uplifting" term comes from F-terms of blow-up modes resolving the singularity of the non-perturbative quiver. We discuss phenomenological and cosmological implications of this mechanism. This set-up also allows a realisation of the LVS for manifolds with zero or positive Euler number.
  • A generic feature of the known string inflationary models is that the same physics that makes the inflaton lighter than the Hubble scale during inflation often also makes other scalars this light. These scalars can acquire isocurvature fluctuations during inflation, and given that their VEVs determine the mass spectrum and the coupling constants of the effective low-energy field theory, these fluctuations give rise to couplings and masses that are modulated from one Hubble patch to another. These seem just what is required to obtain primordial adiabatic fluctuations through conversion into density perturbations through the `modulation mechanism', wherein reheating takes place with different efficiency in different regions of our Universe. Fluctuations generated in this way can generically produce non-gaussianity larger than obtained in single-field slow-roll inflation; potentially observable in the near future. We provide here the first explicit example of the modulation mechanism at work in string cosmology, within the framework of LARGE Volume Type-IIB string flux compactifications. The inflationary dynamics involves two light Kaehler moduli: a fibre divisor plays the role of the inflaton whose decay rate to visible sector degrees of freedom is modulated by the primordial fluctuations of a blow-up mode (which is made light by the use of poly-instanton corrections). We find the challenges of embedding the mechanism into a concrete UV completion constrains the properties of the non-gaussianity that is found, since for generic values of the underlying parameters, the model predicts a local bi-spectrum with fNL of order `a few'. However, a moderate tuning of the parameters gives also rise to explicit examples with fNL O(20) potentially observable by the Planck satellite.
  • We construct flux-stabilised IIB compactifications whose extra dimensions (EDs) have very different sizes, and use these to describe several vacua with a TeV string scale. Because we can access regimes where 2 dimensions are hierarchically larger than the other 4, we find examples where 2 dimensions are micron-sized while the other 4 are at the weak scale in addition to standard examples with all 6 EDs equally large. Besides providing UV completeness, the phenomenology of these models is richer than vanilla large-dimensional models in several ways: (i) they are supersymmetric, with SUSY broken at sub-eV scales in the bulk but only nonlinearly realised in the SM sector, leading to no MSSM superpartners and many more bulk missing-energy channels, as in supersymmetric large extra dimensions (SLED); (ii) small cycles in the complicated extra-dimensional geometry allow some KK states to reside at TeV scales even if all 6 EDs are much larger; (iii) a rich spectrum of string and KK states at TeV scales; and (iv) an equally rich spectrum of light moduli having unusually small (but technically natural) masses, with potentially interesting implications for cosmology and astrophysics that nonetheless evade new-force constraints. The hierarchy problem is solved because the extra-dimensional volume is naturally stabilised at exponentially large values: the EDs are CY geometries with a 4D K3 or T^4-fibration over a 2D base, with moduli stabilised within the LARGE-Volume scenario. The new technical step is the use of poly-instanton corrections to the superpotential (which, unlike for simpler models, are likely to be present on K3 or T^4-fibered CY compactifications) to obtain a large hierarchy between the sizes of different dimensions. For several scenarios we identify the low-energy spectrum and briefly discuss some of their astrophysical, cosmological and phenomenological implications.
  • We argue that the problem of finding lower-dimensional de Sitter solutions to the classical field equations of higher-dimensional supergravity necessarily requires understanding the back-reaction of whatever localized objects source the bulk fields. However, we also find that most of the details of the back-reacted solutions are not important for determining the lower-dimensional curvature. We find, in particular, a classically exact expression that, for a broad class of geometries, directly relates the curvature of the lower-dimensional geometry to asymptotic properties of various bulk fields near the sources. Specializing to codimension-two sources, we find that the contribution involving the asymptotic behaviour of the warp factor (which has a definite sign for most supergravities and so is usually used to infer a preference for anti-de Sitter geometries) is precisely canceled by the contribution of the sources themselves (that are left out in earlier treatments). We identify which combination of bulk fields survives this cancelation, and so controls the sign of the lower-dimensional geometry, for several supergravities in 6, 10 and 11 dimensions. Our results show precisely why explicit 4D de Sitter solutions to 6D supergravity evade general no-go theorems. As an application we show that all classical compactifications of Type IIB supergravity (and F-theory) to 8 dimensions are 8D-flat if they involve only the metric and the axio-dilaton sourced by codimension-two sources, extending earlier results to include warped solutions and more general source properties.
  • We perform a Bayesian model selection analysis in the the R-parity conserving MSSM to compare two different assumptions: whether the lightest neutralinos make all or only part of the cold dark matter. This corresponds to either imposing full WMAP relic density limits or just its upper bound for constraining the MSSM parameters. We consider several realisations of the MSSM, namely, three GUT-scale SUSY breaking scenarios with a handful of parameters corresponding to the CMSSM, anomaly mediation and the large volume string scenarios as well as the weak-scale 25-parameter phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). The results give a data-based quantitative evidence for a multicomponent cold dark matter. The pMSSM posterior samples indicate that the choice of imposing full WMAP limits or just its upper bound affects mostly the gaugino-higgsino content of the neutralino and, against naive expectations, essentially not any other sector.
  • Inflationary scenarios in string theory often involve a large number of light scalar fields, whose presence can enrich the post-inflationary evolution of primordial fluctuations generated during the inflationary epoch. We provide a simple example of such post-inflationary processing within an explicit string-inflationary construction, using a Kahler modulus as the inflaton within the framework of LARGE Volume Type-IIB string flux compactifications. We argue that inflationary models within this broad category often have a selection of scalars that are light enough to be cosmologically relevant, whose contributions to the primordial fluctuation spectrum can compete with those generated in the standard way by the inflaton. These models consequently often predict nongaussianity at a level, f_NL ~ O(10), potentially observable by the Planck satellite, with a bi-spectrum maximized by triangles with squeezed shape in a string realisation of the curvaton scenario. We argue that the observation of such a signal would robustly prefer string cosmologies such as these that predict a multi-field dynamics during the very early universe.
  • Standard lore asserts that quantum effects generically forbid the occurrence of light (non-pseudo-Goldstone) scalars having masses smaller than the Kaluza Klein scale, M_KK, in extra-dimensional models, or the gravitino mass, M_3/2, in supersymmetric situations. We argue that a hidden assumption underlies this lore: that the scale of gravitational physics, M_g, (e.g. the string scale, M_s, in string theory) is of order the Planck mass, M_p = 10^18 GeV. We explore sensitivity to this assumption using the spectrum of masses arising within the specific framework of large-volume string compactifications, for which the ultraviolet completion at the gravity scale is explicitly known to be a Type IIB string theory. In such models the separation between M_g and M_p is parameterized by the (large) size of the extra dimensional volume, V (in string units), according to M_p: M_g: M_KK: M_3/2 = 1: V^{-1/2}: V^{-2/3}: V^{-1}. We find that the generic size of quantum corrections to masses is of the order of M_KK M_3/2 / M_p ~ M_p / V^{5/3}. The mass of the lighest modulus (corresponding to the extra-dimensional volume) which at the classical level is M_V ~ M_p/V^{3/2} << M_3/2 << M_KK is thus stable against quantum corrections. This is possible because the couplings of this modulus to other forms of matter in the low-energy theory are generically weaker than gravitational strength (something that is also usually thought not to occur according to standard lore). We discuss some phenomenological and cosmological implications of this observation.
  • We perform a global Bayesian fit of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model (pMSSM) to current indirect collider and dark matter data. The pMSSM contains the most relevant 25 weak-scale MSSM parameters, which are simultaneously fit using `nested sampling' Monte Carlo techniques in more than 15 years of CPU time. We calculate the Bayesian evidence for the pMSSM and constrain its parameters and observables in the context of two widely different, but reasonable, priors to determine which inferences are robust. We make inferences about sparticle masses, the sign of the $\mu$ parameter, the amount of fine tuning, dark matter properties and the prospects for direct dark matter detection without assuming a restrictive high-scale supersymmetry breaking model. We find the inferred lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass as an example of an approximately prior independent observable. This analysis constitutes the first statistically convergent pMSSM global fit to all current data.
  • The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory to test the hypothesis of TeV scale strings and D-brane models. An overview of these possibilities is presented in the spirit that it will serve as a companion to the Technical Design Reports (TDRs) by the particle detector groups ATLAS and CMS to facilitate the test of the new theoretical ideas at the LHC. Which of these ideas stands the test of the LHC data will govern the course of particle physics in the subsequent decades.
  • We investigate bulk moduli stabilisation and supersymmetry breaking in local string/F-theory models where the Standard Model is supported on a del Pezzo surface or singularity. Computing the gravity mediated soft terms on the Standard Model brane induced by bulk supersymmetry breaking in the LARGE volume scenario, we explicitly find suppressions by M_s/M_P ~ V^{-1/2} compared to M_{3/2}. This gives rise to several phenomenological scenarios, depending on the strength of perturbative corrections to the effective action and the source of de Sitter lifting, in which the soft terms are suppressed by at least M_P/V^{3/2} and may be as small as M_P/V^2. Since the gravitino mass is of order M_{3/2} ~ M_P/V, for TeV soft terms all these scenarios give a very heavy gravitino (M_{3/2} >= 10^8 GeV) and generically the lightest moduli field is also heavy enough (m >= 10 TeV) to avoid the cosmological moduli problem. For TeV soft terms, these scenarios predict a minimal value of the volume to be V ~ 10^{6-7} in string units, which would give a unification scale of order M_{GUT} ~ M_s V^{1/6} ~ 10^{16} GeV. The strong suppression of gravity mediated soft terms could also possibly allow a scenario of dominant gauge mediation in the visible sector but with a very heavy gravitino M_{3/2} > 1 TeV.
  • We present a general set-up for inflation in string theory where the inflaton field corresponds to Wilson lines in compact space in the presence of magnetic fluxes. T-dualities and limits on the value of the magnetic fluxes relate this system to the standard D-brane inflation scenarios, such as brane-antibrane inflation, D3/D7 brane inflation and different configurations of branes at angles. This can then be seen as a generalised approach to inflation from open string modes. Inflation ends when the Wilson lines achieve a critical value and an open string mode becomes tachyonic. Then hybrid-like inflation, including its cosmic string remnants, is realized in string theory beyond the brane annihilation picture. Our formalism can be incorporated within flux-induced moduli stabilisation mechanisms in type IIB strings. Also, contrary to the standard D-brane separation, Wilson lines can be considered in heterotic string models. We provide explicit examples to illustrate similarities and differences of our mechanism to D-brane inflation. In particular we present an example in which the eta-problem present in brane inflation models is absent in our case. We have examples with both blue and red tilted spectral index and remnant cosmic string tension $G\mu \lesssim 10^{-7}$.
  • We address the size of supersymmetry-breaking effects within higher-dimensional settings where the observable sector resides deep within a strongly warped region, with supersymmetry breaking not necessarily localized in that region. Our particular interest is in how the supersymmetry-breaking scale seen by the observable sector depends on this warping. We obtain this dependence in two ways: by computing within the microscopic (string) theory supersymmetry-breaking masses in supermultiplets; and by investigating how warping gets encoded into masses within the low-energy 4D effective theory. We find that the lightest gravitino mode can have mass much less than the straightforward estimate from the mass shift of the unwarped zero mode. This lightest Kaluza-Klein excitation plays the role of the supersymmetric partner of the graviton and has a warped mass m_{3/2} proportional to e^A, with e^A the warp factor, and controls the size of the soft SUSY breaking terms. We formulate the conditions required for the existence of a description in terms of a 4D SUGRA formulation, or in terms of 4D SUGRA together with soft-breaking terms, and describe in particular situations where neither exist for some non-supersymmetric compactifications. We suggest that some effects of warping are captured by a linear $A$ dependence in the Kahler potential. We outline some implications of our results for the KKLT scenario of moduli stabilization with broken SUSY.
  • We study the supersymmetric particle spectra and LHC collider observables for the large-volume string models with a fundamental scale of 10^{11} GeV that arise in moduli-fixed string compactifications with branes and fluxes. The presence of magnetic fluxes on the brane world volume, required for chirality, perturb the soft terms away from those previously computed in the dilute-flux limit. We use the difference in high-scale gauge couplings to estimate the magnitude of this perturbation and study the potential effects of the magnetic fluxes by generating many random spectra with the soft terms perturbed around the dilute flux limit. Even with a 40% variation in the high-scale soft terms the low-energy spectra take a clear and predictive form. The resulting spectra are broadly similar to those arising on the SPS1a slope, but more degenerate. In their minimal version the models predict the ratios of gaugino masses to be M_1 : M_2 : M_3=(1.5 - 2) : 2 : 6, different to both mSUGRA and mirage mediation. Among the scalars, the squarks tend to be lighter and the sleptons heavier than for comparable mSUGRA models. We generate 10 fb^{-1} of sample LHC data for the random spectra in order to study the range of collider phenomenology that can occur. We perform a detailed mass reconstruction on one example large-volume string model spectrum. 100 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity is sufficient to discriminate the model from mSUGRA and aspects of the sparticle spectrum can be accurately reconstructed.
  • Anomalous U(1)'s are ubiquitous in 4D chiral string models. Their presence crucially affects the process of moduli stabilisation and cannot be neglected in realistic set-ups. Their net effect in the 4D effective action is to induce a matter field dependence in the non-perturbative superpotential and a Fayet-Iliopoulos D-term. We study flux compactifications of IIB string theory in the presence of magnetised D7 branes. These give rise to anomalous U(1)'s that modify the standard moduli stabilisation procedure. We consider simple orientifold models to determine the matter field spectrum and the form of the effective field theory. We apply our results to one-modulus KKLT and multi-moduli large volume scenarios, in particular to the Calabi-Yau P^4_{[1,1,1,6,9]}. After stabilising the matter fields, the effective action for the Kahler moduli can acquire an extra positive term that can be used for de Sitter lifting with non-vanishing F- and D-terms. This provides an explicit realization of the D-term lifting proposal of hep-th/0309187.
  • Recent progress in understanding modulus stabilization in string theory relies on the existence of a non-renormalization theorem for the 4D compactifications of Type IIB supergravity which preserve N=1 supersymmetry. We provide a simple proof of this non-renormalization theorem for a broad class of Type IIB vacua using the known symmetries of these compactifications, thereby putting them on a similar footing as the better-known non-renormalization theorems of heterotic vacua without fluxes. The explicit dependence of the tree-level flux superpotential on the dilaton field makes the proof more subtle than in the absence of fluxes.
  • We present a new version of our racetrack inflation scenario which, unlike our original proposal, is based on an explicit compactification of type IIB string theory: the Calabi-Yau manifold P^4_[1,1,1,6,9]. The axion-dilaton and all complex structure moduli are stabilized by fluxes. The remaining 2 Kahler moduli are stabilized by a nonperturbative superpotential, which has been explicitly computed. For this model we identify situations for which a linear combination of the axionic parts of the two Kahler moduli acts as an inflaton. As in our previous scenario, inflation begins at a saddle point of the scalar potential and proceeds as an eternal topological inflation. For a certain range of inflationary parameters, we obtain the COBE-normalized spectrum of metric perturbations and an inflationary scale of M = 3 x 10^{14} GeV. We discuss possible changes of parameters of our model and argue that anthropic considerations favor those parameters that lead to a nearly flat spectrum of inflationary perturbations, which in our case is characterized by the spectral index n_s = 0.95.
  • Dec. 7, 2005 hep-ph
    High-precision analyses of supersymmetry parameters aim at reconstructing the fundamental supersymmetric theory and its breaking mechanism. A well defined theoretical framework is needed when higher-order corrections are included. We propose such a scheme, Supersymmetry Parameter Analysis SPA, based on a consistent set of conventions and input parameters. A repository for computer programs is provided which connect parameters in different schemes and relate the Lagrangian parameters to physical observables at LHC and high energy e+e- linear collider experiments, i.e., masses, mixings, decay widths and production cross sections for supersymmetric particles. In addition, programs for calculating high-precision low energy observables, the density of cold dark matter (CDM) in the universe as well as the cross sections for CDM search experiments are included. The SPA scheme still requires extended efforts on both the theoretical and experimental side before data can be evaluated in the future at the level of the desired precision. We take here an initial step of testing the SPA scheme by applying the techniques involved to a specific supersymmetry reference point.
  • We compute (as functions of the shape and Wilson-line moduli) the one-loop Casimir energy induced by higher-dimensional supergravities compactified from 6D to 4D on 2-tori, and on some of their Z_N orbifolds. Detailed calculations are given for a 6D scalar field having an arbitrary 6D mass m, and we show how to extend these results to higher-spin fields for supersymmetric 6D theories. Particular attention is paid to regularization issues and to the identification of the divergences of the potential, as well as the dependence of the result on m, including limits for which m^2 A<< 1 and m^2 A>> 1 where A is the volume of the internal 2 dimensions. Our calculation extends those in the literature to very general boundary conditions for fields about the various cycles of these geometries. The results have potential applications towards Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions (SLED) as a theory of the Dark Energy. First, they provide an explicit calculation within which to follow the dependence of the result on the mass of the bulk states which travel within the loop, and for heavy masses these results bear out the more general analysis of the UV-sensitivity obtained using heat-kernel methods. Second, because the potentials we find describe the dynamics of the classical flat directions of these compactifications, within SLED they would describe the present-day dynamics of the Dark Energy.