• We report on the Fermi-LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi-LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO. All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR)and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi-LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.
  • During its first six years of operation, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected >30 MeV gamma-ray emission from more than 40 solar flares, nearly a factor of 10 more than those detected by EGRET. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emissions, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. We will present an overview of solar flare detections with LAT, highlighting recent results and surprising features, including the detection of >100 MeV emission associated with flares located behind the limb. Such flares may shed new light on the relationship between the sites of particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission.
  • Strongly Doppler-shifted Stokes $V$ profiles have been detected in the quiet Sun with the IMaX instrument on-board the SUNRISE stratospheric balloon-borne telescope. High velocities are required in order to produce such signals, hence these events have been interpreted as jets, although other sources are also possible. We aim to characterize the variation of the main properties of these events (occurrence rate, lifetime, size and velocities) with their position on the solar disk between disk centre and the solar limb. These events have been identified in Sunrise/IMaX data according to the same objective criteria at all available positions on the solar disk. Their properties were determined using standard techniques. Our study yielded a number of new insights into this phenomenon. Most importantly, the number density of these events is independent of the heliocentric angle, i.e. the investigated supersonic flows are nearly isotropically distributed. Size and lifetime are also nearly independent of the heliocentric angle, while their intensity contrast increases towards the solar limb. The Stokes $V$ jets are associated with upflow velocities deduced from Stokes $I$, which are stronger towards the limb. Their intensity decreases with time, while their line-of-sight (LOS) velocity does not display a clear temporal evolution. Their association with linear polarization signals decreases towards the limb. The density of events appears to be independent of heliocentric angle, establishing that they are directed nearly randomly. If these events are jets triggered by magnetic reconnection between emerging magnetic flux and the ambient field, then our results suggest that there is no preferred geometry for the reconnection process.
  • We aim to characterise the appearance and behaviour of a flare and filament ejection which occurred on 8th September 1999 and was observed by TRACE in L-alpha as well as by the Yohkoh Soft and Hard X-ray telescopes. We explore the flare energetics and its spatial and temporal evolution. A correction is applied to the TRACE data to obtain a better estimate of the pure L-alpha signature. The L-alpha power is obtained from a knowledge of the TRACE response function, and the flare electron energy budget is estimated by interpreting Yohkoh/HXT emission in the context of the collisional thick target model.