• Low-mass galaxies are subject to strong galactic outflows, in which cosmic rays may play an important role, they can be best traced with low-frequency radio continuum observations, which are less affected by spectral ageing. We present a study of the nearby star burst dwarf irregular galaxy IC 10 using observations at 140 MHz with the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR), at 1580 MHz with the Very Large Array (VLA) and at 6200 MHz with the VLA and the 100-m Effelsberg telescope. We find that IC 10 has a low-frequency radio halo, which manifests itself as a second component (thick disc) in the minor axis profiles of the non-thermal radio continuum emission at 140 and 1580 MHz. These profiles are then fitted with 1D cosmic-ray transport models for pure diffusion and advection. We find that a diffusion model fits best, with a diffusion coefficient of $D=(0.4$-$0.8) \times 10^{26}(E/{\rm GeV})^{0.5}~{\rm cm^2\,s^{-1}}$, which is at least an order of magnitude smaller than estimates both from anisotropic diffusion and the diffusion length. In contrast, advection models, which cannot be ruled out due to the mild inclination, while providing poorer fits, result in advection speeds close to the escape velocity of $\approx$$50~\rm km\,s^{-1}$, as expected for a cosmic-ray driven wind. Our favoured model with an accelerating wind provides a self-consistent solution, where the magnetic field is in energy equipartition with both the warm neutral and warm ionized medium with an important contribution from cosmic rays. Consequently, cosmic rays can play a vital role for the launching of galactic winds in the disc--halo interface.
  • Observations show that massive star formation quenches first at centers of galaxies. To understand quenching mechanisms, we investigate the thermal and nonthermal energy balance in the central kpc of NGC1097- a prototypical galaxy undergoing quenching- and present a systematic study of the nuclear star formation efficiency and its dependencies. This region is dominated by the nonthermal pressure from the magnetic field, cosmic rays, and turbulence. A comparison of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio of the molecular clouds shows that most of them are magnetically critical or supported against gravitational collapse needed to form cores of massive stars. Moreover, the star formation efficiency of the clouds drops with the magnetic field strength. Such an anti-correlation holds with neither the turbulent nor the thermal pressure. Hence, a progressive built up of the magnetic field results in high-mass stars forming inefficiently, and it may be the cause of the low-mass stellar population in the bulges of galaxies.
  • The [NII] 122 and 205 \mu m transitions are powerful tracers of the ionized gas in the interstellar medium. By combining data from 21 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH and Beyond the Peak surveys, we have compiled 141 spatially resolved regions with a typical size of ~1 kiloparsec, with observations of both [NII] far-infrared lines. We measure [NII] 122/205 line ratios in the ~0.6-6 range, which corresponds to electron gas densities $n_e$~1-300 cm$^{-3}$, with a median value of $n_e$=30 cm$^{-3}$. Variations in the electron density within individual galaxies can be as a high as a factor of ~50, frequently with strong radial gradients. We find that $n_e$ increases as a function of infrared color, dust-weighted mean starlight intensity, and star formation rate surface density ($\Sigma_{SFR}$). As the intensity of the [NII] transitions is related to the ionizing photon flux, we investigate their reliability as tracers of the star formation rate (SFR). We derive relations between the [NII] emission and SFR in the low-density limit and in the case of a log-normal distribution of densities. The scatter in the correlation between [NII] surface brightness and $\Sigma_{SFR}$ can be understood as a property of the $n_e$ distribution. For regions with $n_e$ close to or higher than the [NII] line critical densities, the low-density limit [NII]-based SFR calibration systematically underestimates the SFR since [NII] emission is collisionally quenched. Finally, we investigate the relation between [NII] emission, SFR, and $n_e$ by comparing our observations to predictions from the MAPPINGS-III code.
  • The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields as well as the influence of the magnetic fields on the evolution of galaxies are unknown. Though not without challenges, the dynamo theory can explain the large-scale coherent magnetic fields which govern galaxies, but observational evidence for the theory is so far very scarce. Putting together the available data of non-interacting, non-cluster galaxies with known large-scale magnetic fields, we find a tight correlation between the integrated polarized flux density, S(PI), and the rotation speed, v(rot), of galaxies. This leads to an almost linear correlation between the large-scale magnetic field B and v(rot), assuming that the number of cosmic ray electrons is proportional to the star formation rate, and a super-linear correlation assuming equipartition between magnetic fields and cosmic rays. This correlation cannot be attributed to an active linear alpha-Omega dynamo, as no correlation holds with global shear or angular speed. It indicates instead a coupling between the large-scale magnetic field and the dynamical mass of the galaxies, B ~ M^(0.25-0.4). Hence, faster rotating and/or more massive galaxies have stronger large-scale magnetic fields. The observed B-v(rot) correlation shows that the anisotropic turbulent magnetic field dominates B in fast rotating galaxies as the turbulent magnetic field, coupled with gas, is enhanced and ordered due to the strong gas compression and/or local shear in these systems. This study supports an stationary condition for the large-scale magnetic field as long as the dynamical mass of galaxies is constant.
  • The [CII] 157.74 $\mu$m transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [CII] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [CII] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGN). The uncertainty of the $\Sigma_{\rm [CII]}-\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ calibration is $\pm$0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted $\Sigma_{\rm[CII]}-\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ correlation is valid over almost 5 orders of magnitude in $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [CII] luminosity instead of surface brightness to estimate SFR suffers from worse systematics, frequently underpredicting SFR in luminous infrared galaxies even after IR color adjustment (although this depends on the SFR measure employed). We suspect that surface brightness relations are better behaved than the luminosity relations because the former are more closely related to the local far-UV field strength, most likely the main parameter controlling the efficiency of the conversion of far-UV radiation into gas heating. A simple model based on Starburst99 population-synthesis code to connect SFR to [CII] finds that heating efficiencies are $1\%-3\%$ in normal galaxies.
  • NGC 2146, a nearby luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG), presents evidence for outflows along the disk minor axis in all gas phases (ionized, neutral atomic and molecular). We present an analysis of the multi-phase starburst driven superwind in the central 5 kpc as traced in spatially resolved spectral line observations, using far-IR Herschel PACS spectroscopy, to probe the effects on the atomic and ionized gas, and optical integral field spectroscopy to examine the ionized gas through diagnostic line ratios. We observe an increased ~250 km/s velocity dispersion in the [OI] 63 micron, [OIII] 88 micron, [NII] 122 micron and [CII] 158 micron fine-structure lines that is spatially coincident with high excitation gas above and below the disk. We model this with a slow ~200 km/s shock and trace the superwind to the edge of our field of view 2.5 kpc above the disk. We present new SOFIA 37 micron observations to explore the warm dust distribution, and detect no clear dust entrainment in the outflow. The stellar kinematics appear decoupled from the regular disk rotation seen in all gas phases, consistent with a recent merger event disrupting the system. We consider the role of the superwind in the evolution of NGC 2146 and speculate on the evolutionary future of the system. Our observations of NGC 2146 in the far-IR allow an unobscured view of the wind, crucial for tracing the superwind to the launching region at the disk center, and provide a local analog for future ALMA observations of outflows in high redshift systems.
  • We study the wavelength dependence of the dust emission as a function of position and environment across the disk of M33 at a linear resolution of 160 pc using Spitzer and Herschel photometric data. Expressing the emissivity of the dust as a power law, the power-law exponent (beta) is estimated from two independent approaches designed to properly treat the degeneracy between beta and the dust temperature. Both beta and the dust temperature are higher in the inner disk than in the outer disk, contrary to reported beta-T anti-correlations found in other sources. In the cold + warm dust model, the warm component and the ionized gas (Halpha) have a very similar distribution across the galaxy, demonstrating that the model separates the components in an appropriate fashion. The flocculent spiral arms and the dust lanes are evident in the map of the cold component. Both cold and warm dust column densities are high in star forming regions and reach their maxima toward the giant star forming complexes NGC604 and NGC595. beta declines from close to 2 in the center to about 1.3 in the outer disk. beta is positively correlated with star formation and with molecular gas column, as traced by Halpha and CO emission. The lower dust emissivity index in the outer parts of M33 is likely related to the reduced metallicity (different grain composition) and possibly different size distribution. It is not due to the decrease in stellar radiation field or temperature in a simple way because the FIR-bright regions in the outer disk also have a low beta. Like most spirals, M33 has a (decreasing) radial gradient in star formation and molecular-to-atomic gas ratio such that the regions bright in Halpha or CO tend to trace the inner disk, making it difficult to distinguish between their effects on the dust.
  • Interstellar magnetic fields and the propagation of cosmic ray electrons have an important impact on the radio-infrared (IR) correlation in galaxies. This becomes evident when studying different spatial scales within galaxies. We investigate the correlation between the infrared (IR) and free-free/synchrotron radio continuum emission at 20 cm from the two local group galaxies M31 and M33 on spatial scales between 0.4 and 10 kpc. The multi-scale radio-IR correlations have been carried out using a wavelet analysis. The free-free and IR emission are correlated on all scales, but on some scales the synchrotron emission is only marginally correlated with the IR emission. The synchrotron-IR correlation is stronger in M33 than in M31 on small scales (<1 kpc), but it is weaker than in M31 on larger scales. Taking the smallest scale on which the synchrotron-IR correlation exists as the propagation length of cosmic ray electrons, we show that the difference on small scales can be explained by the smaller propagation length in M33 than in M31. On large scales, the difference is due to the thick disk/halo in M33, which is absent in M31. A comparison of our data with data on NGC6946, the LMC and M51 suggests that the propagation length is determined by the ratio of ordered-to-turbulent magnetic field strength, which is consistent with diffusion of CR electrons in the ISM. As the diffusion length of CR electrons influences the radio-IR correlation, this dependence is a direct observational evidence of the importance of magnetic fields for the radio-IR correlation within galaxies. The star formation rate per surface area only indirectly influences the diffusion length as it increases the strength of the turbulent magnetic field.
  • Dust has long been identified as a barrier to measuring inherent galaxy properties. However, the link between dust and attenuation is not straightforward and depends on both the amount of dust and its distribution. Herschel imaging of nearby galaxies undertaken as part of the KINGFISH project allows us to map the dust as seen in emission with unprecedented sensitivity and ~1 kpc resolution. We present here new optical integral field unit spectroscopy for eight of these galaxies that provides complementary 100-200 pc scale maps of the dust attenuation through observation of the reddening in both the Balmer decrement and the stellar continuum. The stellar continuum reddening, which is systematically less than that observed in the Balmer decrement, shows no clear correlation with the dust, suggesting that the distribution of stellar reddening acts as a poor tracer of the overall dust content. The brightest HII regions are observed to be preferentially located in dusty regions, and we do find a correlation between the Balmer line reddening and the dust mass surface density for which we provide an empirical relation. Some of the high-inclination systems in our sample exhibit high extinction, but we also find evidence that unresolved variations in the dust distribution on scales smaller than 500 pc may contribute to the scatter in this relation. We caution against the use of integrated A_V measures to infer global dust properties.
  • Observations of galaxies at sub-millimeter wavelengths, where the emission is mainly due to cold dust, are required to constrain the dust physical properties and provide important insight on the gas content of galaxies. We mapped NGC1365 at 870um with LABOCA, the Large APEX Bolometer Camera, allowing us to probe the central mass concentration as well as the rate at which the gas flows to the center. We obtained the dust physical properties both globally and locally for different locations in the galaxy. A 20 K modified black body represents about 98% of the total dust content of the galaxy, the rest can be represented by a warmer dust component of 40 K. The bar exhibits an east-west asymmetry in the dust distribution: The eastern bar is heavier than the western bar by more than a factor of 4. Integrating the dust SED, we derive a total infrared (IR) luminosity of 9.8 x 10^{10} L_{\odot} leading to a dust-enshrouded star formation rate of ~16.7 M_{\odot} per year in NGC1365. We derive the gas mass from the measurements of the dust emission resulting in a CO-to-H2 conversion factor of X_{CO}~1.2x10^{20} mol cm^{-2} (K km s^{-1})^{-1} in the central disk including the bar. Taking into account the metallicity variation, the central gas mass concentration is only ~20% at R<40" (3.6 kpc). On the other hand, the time-scale with which the gas flows into the center, ~300 Myr, is rather short. This indicates that the current central mass in NGC1365 is evolving fast due to the strong bar.
  • We present new empirical calibrations to estimate resolved and integrated total infrared luminosities from Spitzer and Herschel bands used as monochromatic or combined tracers. We base our calibrations on resolved elements of nearby galaxies (3 to 30 Mpc) observed with Herschel. We perform a resolved SED modelling of these objects using the Draine and Li (2007) dust models and investigate the influence of the addition of SPIRE measurements in the estimation of LTIR. We find that using data up to 250 um leads to local LTIR values consistent with those obtained with a complete coverage (up to 500 um) within 10 per cent for most of our resolved elements. We then study the distribution of energy in the resolved SEDs of our galaxies. The bulk of energy (30-50 per cent) is contained in the (70-160 um) band. The (24-70 um) fraction decreases with increasing metallicity. The (160-1100 um) submillimeter band can account for up to 25 per cent of the LTIR in metal-rich galaxies. We investigate the correlation between TIR surface brightnesses/luminosities and monochromatic Spitzer and Herschel surface brightnesses/luminosities. The three PACS bands can be used as reliable monochromatic estimators of the LTIR, the 100 um band being the most reliable monochromatic tracer. There is also a strong correlation between the SPIRE 250um and LTIR, although with more scatter than for the PACS relations. We also study the ability of our monochromatic relations to reproduce integrated LTIR of nearby galaxies as well as LTIR of z=1-3 sources. Finally, we provide calibration coefficients that can be used to derive TIR surface brightnesses/luminosities from a combination of Spitzer and Herschel surface brightnesses/fluxes and analyse the associated uncertainties.
  • We derive the distribution of the synchrotron spectral index across NGC6946 and investigate the correlation between the radio continuum (synchrotron) and far-infrared (FIR) emission using the KINGFISH Herschel PACS and SPIRE data. The radio--FIR correlation is studied as a function of star formation rate, magnetic field strength, radiation field strength, and the total gas surface brightness. The synchrotron emission follows both star-forming regions and the so-called magnetic arms present in the inter-arm regions. The synchrotron spectral index is steepest along the magnetic arms ($\alpha_n \sim 1$), while it is flat in places of giant H{\sc ii} regions and in the center of the galaxy ($\alpha_n \sim 0.6-0.7$). The map of $\alpha_n$ provides an observational evidence for aging and energy loss of cosmic ray electrons propagating in the disk of the galaxy. Variations in the synchrotron--FIR correlation across the galaxy are shown to be a function of both star formation and magnetic fields. We find that the synchrotron emission correlates better with cold rather than with warm dust emission, when the interstellar radiation field is the main heating source of dust. The synchrotron--FIR correlation suggests a coupling between the magnetic field and the gas density. NGC6946 shows a power-law behavior between the total (turbulent) magnetic field strength B and the star formation rate surface density $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ with an index of 0.14\,(0.16)$\pm$0.01. This indicates an efficient production of the turbulent magnetic field with the increasing gas turbulence expected in actively star forming regions. The scale-by-scale analysis of the synchrotron--FIR correlation indicates that the ISM affects the propagation of old/diffused cosmic ray electrons, resulting in a diffusion coefficient of $D_0=4.6\times 10^{28}$\,cm$^2$\,s$^{-1}$ for 2.2\,GeV CREs.
  • Within the framework of the Herschel M 33 extended survey HerM33es we study the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of a set of HII regions in M 33 as a function of the morphology. We present a catalogue of 119 HII regions morphologically classified: 9 filled, 47 mixed, 36 shell, and 27 clear shell HII regions. For each object we extract the photometry at twelve available wavelength bands (from FUV-1516A to IR-250mi) and obtain the SED. We also obtain emission line profiles across the regions to study the location of the stellar, ionised gas, and dust components. We find trends for the SEDs related to the morphology, showing that the star and gas-dust configuration affects the ratios of the emission in different bands. The mixed and filled regions show higher emission at 24mi than the shells and clear shells, which could be due to the proximity of the dust to the stellar clusters in the case of mixed and filled regions. The FIR peak for shells and clear shells seems to be located towards longer wavelengths, indicating that the dust is colder for this type of objects.The logarithmic 100/70mi ratio for filled and mixed regions remains constant over one order of magnitude in Halpha and FUV surface brightness, while the shells and clear shells exhibit a wider range of values of almost two orders of magnitude. We derive dust masses and temperatures fitting the individual SEDs with dust models proposed in the literature. The derived dust mass range is between 10^2-10^4 Msun and the cold dust temperature spans T(cold)~12-27 K. The spherical geometrical model proposed for the Halpha clear shells is confirmed by the emission profile obtained from the observations and is used to infer the electron density within the envelope: the typical electron density is 0.7+-0.3 cm^-3, while filled regions can reach values two to five times higher.
  • Taking advantage of the sensitivity and angular resolution of the Herschel Space Observatory at far-infrared and submm wavelengths, we aim to characterize the physical properties of cold dust within nearby galaxies and study the robustness of the parameters we derive using different modified blackbody models. For a pilot subsample of the KINGFISH program, we perform 2 temperature fits of the Spitzer and Herschel photometric data (24 to 500um), with a warm and a cold component, globally and in each resolution element.At global scales, we observe ranges of values for beta_c(0.8 to 2.5) and Tc(19.1 to 25.1K).We compute maps of our parameters with beta fixed or free to test the robustness of the temperature and dust surface density maps we deduce. When the emissivity is fixed, we observe temperature gradients as a function of radius.When the emissivity is fitted as a free parameter, barred galaxies tend to have uniform fitted emissivities.Gathering resolved elements in a Tc-beta_c diagram underlines an anti-correlation between the two parameters.It remains difficult to assess whether the dominant effect is the physics of dust grains, noise, or mixing along the line of sight and in the beam. We finally observe in both cases that the dust column density peaks in central regions of galaxies and bar ends (coinciding with molecular gas density enhancements usually found in these locations).We also quantify how the total dust mass varies with our assumptions about the emissivity index as well as the influence of the wavelength coverage used in the fits. We show that modified blackbody fits using a shallow emissivity (beta_c < 2.0) lead to significantly lower dust masses compared to the beta_c < 2.0 case, with dust masses lower by up to 50% if beta_c=1.5 for instance.The working resolution affects our total dust mass estimates: masses increase from global fits to spatially-resolved fits.
  • We study the far-infrared emission from the nearby spiral galaxy M33 in order to investigate the dust physical properties such as the temperature and the luminosity density across the galaxy. Taking advantage of the unique wavelength coverage (100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron) of the Herschel Space Observatory and complementing our dataset with Spitzer-IRAC 5.8 and 8 micron and Spitzer-MIPS 24 and 70 micron data, we construct temperature and luminosity density maps by fitting two modified blackbodies of a fixed emissivity index of 1.5. We find that the 'cool' dust grains are heated at temperatures between 11 and 28 K with the lowest temperatures found in the outskirts of the galaxy and the highest ones in the center and in the bright HII regions. The infrared/submillimeter total luminosity (5 - 1000 micron) is estimated to be 1.9x10^9 Lsun. 59% of the total luminosity of the galaxy is produced by the 'cool' dust grains (~15 K) while the rest 41% is produced by 'warm' dust grains (~55 K). The ratio of the cool-to-warm dust luminosity is close to unity (within the computed uncertainties), throughout the galaxy, with the luminosity of the cool dust being slightly enhanced in the center of the galaxy. Decomposing the emission of the dust into two components (one emitted by the diffuse disk of the galaxy and one emitted by the spiral arms) we find that the fraction of the emission in the disk in the mid-infrared (24 micron) is 21%, while it gradually rises up to 57% in the submillimeter (500 micron). We find that the bulk of the luminosity comes from the spiral arm network that produces 70% of the total luminosity of the galaxy with the rest coming from the diffuse dust disk. The 'cool' dust inside the disk is heated at a narrow range of temperatures between 18 and 15 K (going from the center to the outer parts of the galaxy).
  • Power spectra of de-projected images of late-type galaxies in gas and/or dust emission are very useful diagnostics of the dynamics and stability of their interstellar medium. Previous studies have shown that the power spectra can be approximated as two power-laws, a shallow one at large scales (larger than 500 pc) and a steeper one at small scales, with the break between the two corresponding to the line-of-sight thickness of the galaxy disk. We present a thorough analysis of the power spectra of the dust and gas emission at several wavelengths in the nearby galaxy M33. In particular, we use the recently obtained images at five wavelengths by PACS and SPIRE onboard Herschel. The large dynamical range (2-3 dex in scale) of most images allow us to determine clearly the change in slopes from -1.5 to -4, with some variations with wavelength. The break scale is increasing with wavelength, from 100 pc at 24 and 100micron to 350 pc at 500micron, suggesting that the cool dust lies in a thicker disk than the warm dust, may be due to star formation more confined to the plane. The slope at small scale tends to be steeper at longer wavelength, meaning that the warmer dust is more concentrated in clumps. Numerical simulations of an isolated late-type galaxy, rich in gas and with no bulge, like M33, are carried out, in order to better interpret these observed results. Varying the star formation and feedback parameters, it is possible to obtain a range of power-spectra, with two power-law slopes and breaks, which nicely bracket the data. The small-scale power-law is indeed reflecting the 3D behaviour of the gas layer, steepening strongly while the feedback smoothes the structures, by increasing the gas turbulence. M33 appears to correspond to a fiducial model with an SFR of $\sim$ 0.7 Mo/yr, with 10% supernovae energy coupled to the gas kinematics.
  • New far-infrared and sub-millimeter photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 61 nearby galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. The spatially-integrated fluxes are largely consistent with expectations based on Spitzer far-infrared photometry and extrapolations to longer wavelengths using popular dust emission models. Dwarf irregular galaxies are notable exceptions, as already noted by other authors, as their 500um emission shows evidence for a sub-millimeter excess. In addition, the fraction of dust heating attributed to intense radiation fields associated with photo-dissociation regions is found to be (21+/-4)% larger when Herschel data are included in the analysis. Dust masses obtained from the dust emission models of Draine & Li are found to be on average nearly a factor of two higher than those based on single-temperature modified blackbodies, as single blackbody curves do not capture the full range of dust temperatures inherent to any galaxy. The discrepancy is largest for galaxies exhibiting the coolest far-infrared colors.
  • Using the Herschel PACS and SPIRE FIR/submm data, we investigate variations in the dust spectral index $\beta$ in the nearby spiral galaxy M33 at a linear resolution of 160 pc. We use an iteration method in two different approaches, single and two-component modified black body models. In both approaches, $\beta$ is higher in the central disk than in the outer disk similar to the dust temperature. There is a positive correlation between $\beta$ and Halpha as well as with the molecular gas traced by CO(2-1). A Monte-Carlo simulation shows that the physical parameters are better constrained when using the two-component model.
  • Context: The emission line of [CII] at 158 micron is one of the strongest cooling lines of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. Aims: Disentangling the relative contributions of the different ISM phases to [CII] emission, is a major topic of the HerM33es program, a Herschel key project to study the ISM in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. Methods: Using PACS, we have mapped the emission of [CII] 158 micron, [OI] 63 micron, and other FIR lines in a 2'x2' region of the northern spiral arm of M33, centered on the HII region BCLMP302. At the peak of H-alpha emission, we have observed in addition a velocity resolved [CII] spectrum using HIFI. We use scatterplots to compare these data with PACS 160 micron continuum maps, and with maps of CO and HI data, at a common resolution of 12 arcsec or 50 pc. Maps of H-alpha and 24 micron emission observed with Spitzer are used to estimate the SFR. We have created maps of the [CII] and [OI] 63 micron emission and detected [NII] 122 micron and NIII 57 micron at individual positions. Results: The [CII] line observed with HIFI is significantly broader than that of CO, and slightly blue-shifted. In addition, there is little spatial correlation between [CII] observed with PACS and CO over the mapped region. There is even less spatial correlation between [CII] and the atomic gas traced by HI. Detailed comparison of the observed intensities towards the HII region with models of photo ionization and photon dominated regions, confirms that a significant fraction, 20--30%, of the observed [CII] emission stems from the ionized gas and not from the molecular cloud. The gas heating efficiency, using the ratio between [CII] and the TIR as a proxy, varies between 0.07 and 1.5%, with the largest variations found outside the HII region.
  • We present high resolution large scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group Galaxy M33. The observations were carried out using the HERA at the 30m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line achieving a resolution of 12"x2.6 km/s, enabling individual GMCs to be resolved. The observed region mainly along the major axis out to a radius of 8.5 kpc, and covers the strip observed with HIFI/PACS Spectrometers as part of the HERM33ES Herschel key program. The achieved sensitivity in main beam temperature is 20-50 mK at 2.6 km/s velocity resolution. The CO(2-1) luminosity of the observed region is 1.7\pm0.1x10^7 Kkm/s pc^2, corresponding to H2 masses of 1.9x10^8 Msun (including He), calculated with a NH2/ICO twice the Galactic value due to the half-solar metallicity of M33. HI 21 cm VLA archive observations were reduced and the mosaic was imaged and cleaned using the multi-scale task in CASA, yielding a series of datacubes with resolutions ranging from 5" to 25". The HI mass within a radius of 8.5 kpc is estimated to be 1.4x10^9 Msun. The azimuthally averaged CO surface brightness decreases exponentially with a scale length of 1.9\pm0.1 kpc whereas the atomic gas surface density is constant at Sigma_HI=6\pm2 Msun/pc^2 deprojected to face-on. The central kiloparsec H_2 surface density is Sigma_H2=8.5\pm0.2 Msun/pc^2. The star formation rate per unit molecular gas (SF Efficiency, the rate of transformation of molecular gas into stars), as traced by the ratio of CO to Halpha and FIR brightness, is constant with radius. The SFE appears 2-4 times greater than of large spiral galaxies. A morphological comparison of molecular and atomic gas with tracers of star formation shows good agreement between these maps both in terms of peaks and holes. A few exceptions are noted. Several spectra, including those of a molecular cloud situated more than 8 kpc from the galaxy center, are presented.
  • Within the framework of the HERM33ES Key Project, using the high resolution and sensitivity of the Herschel photometric data, we study the compact emission in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33 to investigate the nature of the compact SPIRE emission sources. We extracted a catalogue of sources at 250um in order to investigate the nature of this compact emission. Taking advantage of the unprecedented Herschel resolution at these wavelengths, we also focus on a more precise study of some striking Halpha shells in the northern part of the galaxy. We present a catalogue of 159 compact emission sources in M33 identified by SExtractor in the 250um SPIRE band that is the one that provides the best spatial resolution. We also measured fluxes at 24um and Halpha for those 159 extracted sources. The morphological study of the shells also benefits from a multiwavelength approach including Halpha, far-UV from GALEX, and infrared from both Spitzer IRAC 8um and MIPS 24um in order to make comparisons. For the 159 compact sources selected at 250um, we find a very strong Pearson correlation coefficient with the MIPS 24um emission (r24 = 0.94) and a rather strong correlation with the Halpha emission, although with more scatter (rHa = 0.83). The morphological study of the Halpha shells shows a displacement between far-ultraviolet, Halpha, and the SPIRE bands. The cool dust emission from SPIRE clearly delineates the Halpha shell structures. The very strong link between the 250um compact emission and the 24um and Halpha emissions, by recovering the star formation rate from standard recipes for HII regions, allows us to provide star formation rate calibrations based on the 250um compact emission alone. The different locations of the Halpha and far-ultraviolet emissions with respect to the SPIRE cool dust emission leads to a dynamical age of a few Myr for the Halpha shells and the associated cool dust.
  • Over the past few years several studies have provided estimates of the SFR (star-formation rate) or the total infrared luminosity from just one infrared band. However these relations are generally derived for entire galaxies, which are known to contain a large scale diffuse emission that is not necessarily related to the latest star-formation episode. We provide new relations to estimate the SFR from resolved star-forming regions at 100 mum and 160 mum. We select individual star-forming regions in the nearby (840 kpc) galaxy M33. We estimate the SFR combining the emission in Halpha and at 24 mum to calibrate the emission at 100 mum and 160 mum as SFR estimators, as mapped with PACS/Herschel. The data are obtained in the framework of the HERM33ES open time key project. There is less emission in the HII regions at 160 mum than at 100 mum. Over a dynamic range of almost 2 dex in Sigma(SFR) we find that the 100 mum emission is a nearly linear estimator of the SFR, whereas that at 160 mum is slightly superlinear. The behaviour of individual star-forming regions is surprisingly similar to that of entire galaxies. At high Sigma(SFR), star formation drives the dust temperature, whereas uncertainties and variations in radiation-transfer and dust-heated processes dominate at low Sigma(SFR). Detailed modelling of both galaxies and individual star forming regions will be needed to interpret similarities and differences between the two and assess the fraction of diffuse emission in galaxies.
  • We derive distributions of dust temperature and dust opacity across M31 at 45" resolution using the Spitzer data. With the opacity map and a standard dust model we de-redden the Ha emission yielding the first de-reddened Ha map of M31. We compare the emissions from dust, Ha, HI and H2 by means of radial distributions, pixel-to-pixel correlations and wavelet cross-correlations. The dust temperature steeply decreases from 30K near the center to 15K at large radii. The mean dust optical depth at the Ha wavelength along the line of sight is about 0.7. The radial decrease of the dust-to-gas ratio is similar to that of the oxygen abundance. On scales<2kpc, cold dust emission is best correlated with that of neutral gas and warm dust emission with that of ionized gas. Ha emission is slightly better correlated with emission at 70um than at 24um. In the area 6kpc<R< 17kpc, the total SFR is ~0.3Msun/yr. The Kennicutt-Schmidt law between SFR and total gas has a power-law index of 1.30+-0.05 in the radial range of R=7-11kpc increasing by about 0.3 for R=11-13kpc. The lack of H2 in the central region could be related to the lack of HI and the low opacity/high temperature of the dust. Since neither SFR nor SFE is well correlated with the surface density of H2 or total gas, other factors than gas density must play an important role in the formation of massive stars in M31. The molecular depletion time scale of 1.1 Gyr indicates that M31 is about three times less efficient in forming young massive stars than M33.
  • Using high-resolution data of the linearly polarized intensity and polarization angle at 3.6, 6.2, and 20 cm together with a 3-D model of the regular magnetic field, we study variations of the structure, strength, and energy density of the magnetic field in the Scd galaxy M33. The regular magnetic field consists of a horizontal component (represented by an axisymmetric mode from 1 to 3 kpc radius and a superposition of axisymmetric and bisymmetric modes from 3 to 5 kpc radius) and a vertical component. However, the inferred `vertical field' may be partly due to a galactic warp. We estimate the average total and regular magnetic field strengths as ~ 6.4 and 2.5 $\mu$G, respectively. Generation of interstellar magnetic fields by turbulent gas motion in M33 is indicated as the turbulent and magnetic energy densities are about equal.
  • Using the linearly polarized intensity and polarization angle data at 3.6, 6.2 and 20 cm, we determine variations of Faraday rotation and depolarization across the nearby galaxy M33. A 3-D model of the regular magnetic field is fitted to the observed azimuthal distribution of polarization angles. Faraday rotation, measured between 3.6 and 6.2 cm at a linear resolution of 0.7 kpc, shows more variation in the south than in the north of the galaxy. About 10% of the nonthermal emission from M33 at 3.6 cm is polarized. We estimate the average total and regular magnetic field strengths in M33 as ~ 6.4 and 2.5 $\mu$G, respectively. Under the assumption that the disk of M33 is flat, the regular magnetic field consists of horizontal and vertical components: however the inferred vertical field may be partly due to a galactic warp. The horizontal field is represented by an axisymmetric (m=0) mode from 1 to 3 kpc radius and a superposition of axisymmetric and bisymmetric (m=0+1) modes from 3 to 5 kpc radius. An excess of differential Faraday rotation in the southern half together with strong Faraday dispersion in the southern spiral arms seem to be responsible for the north-south asymmetry in the observed wavelength dependent depolarization. The presence of an axisymmetric m=0 mode of the regular magnetic field in each ring suggests that a galactic dynamo is operating in M33. The pitch angles of the spiral regular magnetic field are generally smaller than the pitch angles of the optical spiral arms but are twice as big as simple estimates based on the mean-field dynamo theory and M33's rotation curve. Generation of interstellar magnetic fields from turbulent gas motions in M33 is indicated by the equipartition of turbulent and magnetic energy densities.