• Within a galaxy the stellar mass-to-light ratio $\Upsilon_*$ is not constant. Spatially resolved kinematics of nearby early-type galaxies suggest that allowing for a variable initial mass function (IMF) returns significantly larger $\Upsilon_*$ gradients than if the IMF is held fixed. If $\Upsilon_*$ is greater in the central regions, then ignoring the IMF-driven gradient can overestimate $M_*^{\rm dyn}$ by as much as a factor of two for the most massive galaxies, though stellar population estimates $M_*^{\rm SP}$ are also affected. Large $\Upsilon_*$-gradients have four main consequences: First, $M_*^{\rm dyn}$ cannot be estimated independently of stellar population synthesis models. Second, if there is a lower limit to $\Upsilon_*$ and gradients are unknown, then requiring $M_*^{\rm dyn}=M_*^{\rm SP}$ constrains them. Third, if gradients are stronger in more massive galaxies, then $M_*^{\rm dyn}$ and $M_*^{\rm SP}$ can be brought into agreement, not by shifting $M_*^{\rm SP}$ upwards by invoking constant bottom-heavy IMFs, as advocated by a number of recent studies, but by revising $M_*^{\rm dyn}$ estimates in the literature downwards. Fourth, accounting for $\Upsilon_*$ gradients changes the high-mass slope of the stellar mass function $\phi(M_*^{\rm dyn})$, and reduces the associated stellar mass density. These conclusions potentially impact estimates of the need for feedback and adiabatic contraction, so our results highlight the importance of measuring $\Upsilon_*$ gradients in larger samples.
  • We present the first data release of high-resolution ($\leq0.2$ arcsec) 1.5-GHz radio images of 103 nearby galaxies from the Palomar sample, observed with the eMERLIN array, as part of the LeMMINGs survey. This sample includes galaxies which are active (LINER and Seyfert) and quiescent (HII galaxies and Absorption line galaxies, ALG), which are reclassified based upon revised emission-line diagrams. We detect radio emission $\gtrsim$ 0.2 mJy for 47/103 galaxies (22/34 for LINERS, 4/4 for Seyferts, 16/51 for HII galaxies and 5/14 for ALGs) with radio sizes typically of $\lesssim$100 pc. We identify the radio core position within the radio structures for 41 sources. Half of the sample shows jetted morphologies. The remaining half shows single radio cores or complex morphologies. LINERs show radio structures more core-brightened than Seyferts. Radio luminosities of the sample range from 10$^{32}$ to 10$^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$: LINERs and HII galaxies show the highest and the lowest radio powers respectively, while ALGs and Seyferts have intermediate luminosities. We find that radio core luminosities correlate with black hole (BH) mass down to $\sim$10$^{7}$ M$_{\odot}$, but a break emerges at lower masses. Using [O III] line luminosity as a proxy for the accretion luminosity, active nuclei and jetted HII galaxies follow an optical fundamental plane of BH activity, suggesting a common disc-jet relationship. In conclusion, LINER nuclei are the scaled-down version of FR I radio galaxies; Seyferts show less collimated jets; HII galaxies may host weak active BHs and/or nuclear star-forming cores; and recurrent BH activity may account for ALG properties.
  • Spatially resolved kinematics of nearby galaxies has shown that the ratio of dynamical- to stellar population-based estimates of the mass of a galaxy ($M_*^{\rm JAM}/M_*$) correlates with $\sigma_e$, if $M_*$ is estimated using the same IMF for all galaxies and the stellar M/L ratio within each galaxy is constant. This correlation may indicate that, in fact, the IMF is more dwarf-rich for galaxies with large $\sigma$. We use this correlation to estimate a dynamical or IMF-corrected stellar mass, $M_*^{\rm \alpha_{JAM}}$, from $M_{*}$ and $\sigma_e$ for a sample of $6 \times 10^5$ SDSS galaxies for which spatially resolved kinematics is not available. We also compute the `virial' mass estimate $k(n,R)\,R_e\,\sigma_R^2/G$, where $n$ is the Sersic index, in the SDSS and ATLAS$^{\rm 3D}$ samples. We show that an $n$-dependent correction must be applied to the $k(n,R)$ values provided by Prugniel & Simien (1997). Our analysis also shows that the shape of the velocity dispersion profile in the ATLAS$^{\rm 3D}$ sample varies weakly with $n$: $(\sigma_R/\sigma_e) = (R/R_e)^{-\gamma(n)}$. The resulting stellar mass functions, based on $M_*^{\rm \alpha_{JAM}}$ and the recalibrated virial mass, are in good agreement. If the $M_*^{\rm \alpha_{JAM}}/M_* - \sigma_e$ correlation is indeed due to the IMF, and stellar M/L gradients can be ignored, then our $\phi(M_*^{\rm \alpha_{JAM}})$ is an estimate of the stellar mass function in which $\sigma_e$-dependent variations in the IMF across the population have been accounted for. Using a Fundamental Plane based observational proxy for $\sigma_e$ produces comparable results. By demonstrating that cheaper proxies are sufficiently accurate, our analysis should enable a more reliable census of the mass in stars for large galaxy samples, at a fraction of the cost. Our results are provided in tabular form.
  • Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN) represent the majority of the AGN population. However, due to the difficulties in measuring their black hole (BH) masses, it is still unknown whether they follow the same BH mass-host galaxy scaling relations valid for quiescent galaxies and type 1 AGN. Here we present the locus of type 2 AGN having virial BH mass estimates in the $M_{BH}-\sigma_\star$ plane. Our analysis shows that the BH masses of type 2 AGN are $\sim0.9$ dex smaller than type 1 AGN at $\sigma_\star\sim 185$ km s$^{-1}$, regardless of the (early/late) AGN host galaxy morphology. Equivalently, type 2 AGN host galaxies have stellar velocity dispersions $\sim 0.2$ dex higher than type 1 AGN hosts at $M_{BH}\sim10^7$ M$_\odot$.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey pipeline photometry underestimates the brightnesses of the most luminous galaxies. This is mainly because (i) the SDSS overestimates the sky background and (ii) single or two-component Sersic-based models better fit the surface brightness profile of galaxies, especially at high luminosities, than does the de Vaucouleurs model used by the SDSS pipeline. We use the PyMorph photometric reductions to isolate effect (ii) and show that it is the same in the full sample as in small group environments, and for satellites in the most massive clusters as well. None of these are expected to be significantly affected by intracluster light (ICL). We only see an additional effect for centrals in the most massive halos, but we argue that even this is not dominated by ICL. Hence, for the vast majority of galaxies, the differences between PyMorph and SDSS pipeline photometry cannot be ascribed to the semantics of whether or not one includes the ICL when describing the stellar mass of massive galaxies. Rather, they likely reflect differences in star formation or assembly histories. Failure to account for the SDSS underestimate has significantly biased most previous estimates of the SDSS luminosity and stellar mass functions, and therefore Halo Model estimates of the z ~ 0.1 relation between the mass of a halo and that of the galaxy at its center. We also show that when one studies correlations, at fixed group mass, with a quantity which was not used to define the groups, then selection effects appear. We show why such effects arise, and should not be mistaken for physical effects.
  • We quantify the systematic effects on the stellar mass function which arise from assumptions about the stellar population, as well as how one fits the light profiles of the most luminous galaxies at z ~ 0.1. When comparing results from the literature, we are careful to separate out these effects. Our analysis shows that while systematics in the estimated comoving number density which arise from different treatments of the stellar population remain of order < 0.5 dex, systematics in photometry are now about 0.1 dex, despite recent claims in the literature. Compared to these more recent analyses, previous work based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) pipeline photometry leads to underestimates of rho_*(> M_*) by factors of 3-10 in the mass range 10^11 - 10^11.6 M_Sun, but up to a factor of 100 at higher stellar masses. This impacts studies which match massive galaxies to dark matter halos. Although systematics which arise from different treatments of the stellar population remain of order < 0.5 dex, our finding that systematics in photometry now amount to only about 0.1 dex in the stellar mass density is a significant improvement with respect to a decade ago. Our results highlight the importance of using the same stellar population and photometric models whenever low and high redshift samples are compared.
  • Feedback from accreting SMBHs is often identified as the main mechanism responsible for regulating star-formation in AGN host galaxies. However, the relationships between AGN activity, radiation, winds, and star-formation are complex and still far from being understood. We study scaling relations between AGN properties, host galaxy properties and AGN winds. We then evaluate the wind mean impact on the global star-formation history, taking into account the short AGN duty cycle with respect to that of star-formation. We first collect AGN wind observations for 94 AGN with detected massive winds at sub-pc to kpc spatial scales. We then fold AGN wind scaling relations with AGN luminosity functions, to evaluate the average AGN wind mass-loading factor as a function of cosmic time. We find strong correlations between the AGN molecular and ionised wind mass outflow rates and the AGN bolometric luminosity. The power law scaling is steeper for ionised winds (slope 1.29+/-0.38) than for molecular winds (0.76+/-0.06), meaning that the two rates converge at high bolometric luminosities. The molecular gas depletion timescale and the molecular gas fraction of galaxies hosting powerful AGN winds are 3-10 times shorter and smaller than those of main-sequence galaxies with similar SFR, stellar mass and redshift. These findings suggest that, at high AGN bolometric luminosity, the reduced molecular gas fraction may be due to the destruction of molecules by the wind, leading to a larger fraction of gas in the atomic ionised phase. The AGN wind mass-loading factor $\eta=\dot M_{OF}/SFR$ is systematically higher than that of starburst driven winds. Our analysis shows that AGN winds are, on average, powerful enough to clean galaxies from their molecular gas only in massive systems at z<=2, i.e. a strong form of co-evolution between SMBHs and galaxies appears to break down for the least massive galaxies.
  • R. Adhikari, M. Agostini, N. Anh Ky, T. Araki, M. Archidiacono, M. Bahr, J. Baur, J. Behrens, F. Bezrukov, P.S. Bhupal Dev, D. Borah, A. Boyarsky, A. de Gouvea, C.A. de S. Pires, H.J. de Vega, A.G. Dias, P. Di Bari, Z. Djurcic, K. Dolde, H. Dorrer, M. Durero, O. Dragoun, M. Drewes, G. Drexlin, Ch.E. Düllmann, K. Eberhardt, S. Eliseev, C. Enss, N.W. Evans, A. Faessler, P. Filianin, V. Fischer, A. Fleischmann, J.A. Formaggio, J. Franse, F.M. Fraenkle, C.S. Frenk, G. Fuller, L. Gastaldo, A. Garzilli, C. Giunti, F. Glück, M.C. Goodman, M.C. Gonzalez-Garcia, D. Gorbunov, J. Hamann, V. Hannen, S. Hannestad, S.H. Hansen, C. Hassel, J. Heeck, F. Hofmann, T. Houdy, A. Huber, D. Iakubovskyi, A. Ianni, A. Ibarra, R. Jacobsson, T. Jeltema, J. Jochum, S. Kempf, T. Kieck, M. Korzeczek, V. Kornoukhov, T. Lachenmaier, M. Laine, P. Langacker, T. Lasserre, J. Lesgourgues, D. Lhuillier, Y. F. Li, W. Liao, A.W. Long, M. Maltoni, G. Mangano, N.E. Mavromatos, N. Menci, A. Merle, S. Mertens, A. Mirizzi, B. Monreal, A. Nozik, A. Neronov, V. Niro, Y. Novikov, L. Oberauer, E. Otten, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, M. Pallavicini, V.S. Pantuev, E. Papastergis, S. Parke, S. Pascoli, S. Pastor, A. Patwardhan, A. Pilaftsis, D.C. Radford, P. C.-O. Ranitzsch, O. Rest, D.J. Robinson, P.S. Rodrigues da Silva, O. Ruchayskiy, N.G. Sanchez, M. Sasaki, N. Saviano, A. Schneider, F. Schneider, T. Schwetz, S. Schönert, S. Scholl, F. Shankar, R. Shrock, N. Steinbrink, L. Strigari, F. Suekane, B. Suerfu, R. Takahashi, N. Thi Hong Van, I. Tkachev, M. Totzauer, Y. Tsai, C.G. Tully, K. Valerius, J.W.F. Valle, D. Venos, M. Viel, M. Vivier, M.Y. Wang, C. Weinheimer, K. Wendt, L. Winslow, J. Wolf, M. Wurm, Z. Xing, S. Zhou, K. Zuber
    We present a comprehensive review of keV-scale sterile neutrino Dark Matter, collecting views and insights from all disciplines involved - cosmology, astrophysics, nuclear, and particle physics - in each case viewed from both theoretical and experimental/observational perspectives. After reviewing the role of active neutrinos in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, we focus on sterile neutrinos in the context of the Dark Matter puzzle. Here, we first review the physics motivation for sterile neutrino Dark Matter, based on challenges and tensions in purely cold Dark Matter scenarios. We then round out the discussion by critically summarizing all known constraints on sterile neutrino Dark Matter arising from astrophysical observations, laboratory experiments, and theoretical considerations. In this context, we provide a balanced discourse on the possibly positive signal from X-ray observations. Another focus of the paper concerns the construction of particle physics models, aiming to explain how sterile neutrinos of keV-scale masses could arise in concrete settings beyond the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. The paper ends with an extensive review of current and future astrophysical and laboratory searches, highlighting new ideas and their experimental challenges, as well as future perspectives for the discovery of sterile neutrinos.
  • Galaxy interactions are thought to be one of the main triggers of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), especially at high luminosities, where the accreted gas mass during the AGN lifetime is substantial. Evidence for a connection between mergers and AGN, however, remains mixed. Possible triggering mechanisms remain particularly poorly understood for luminous AGN, which are thought to require triggering by major mergers, rather than secular processes. We analyse the host galaxies of a sample of 20 optically and X-ray selected luminous AGN (log($L_{bol}$ [erg/s]) $>$ 45) at z $\sim$ 0.6 using HST WFC3 data in the F160W/H band. 15/20 sources have resolved host galaxies. We create a control sample of mock AGN by matching the AGN host galaxies to a control sample of non-AGN galaxies. Visual signs of disturbances are found in about 25% of sources in both the AGN hosts and control galaxies. Using both visual classification and quantitative morphology measures, we show that the levels of disturbance are not enhanced when compared to a matched control sample. We find no signs that major mergers play a dominant role in triggering AGN at high luminosities, suggesting that minor mergers and secular processes dominate AGN triggering up to the highest AGN luminosities. The upper limit on the enhanced fraction of major mergers is $\leqslant$20%. While major mergers might increase the incidence of (luminous AGN), they are not the prevalent triggering mechanism in the population of unobscured AGN.
  • The cosmological process of hydrogen (HI) reionization in the intergalactic medium is thought to be driven by UV photons emitted by star-forming galaxies and ionizing active galactic nuclei (AGN). The contribution of QSOs to HI reionization at $z>4$ has been traditionally believed to be quite modest. However, this view has been recently challenged by new estimates of a higher faint-end UV luminosity function (LF). To set firmer constraints on the emissivity of AGN at $z<6$, we here make use of complete X-ray selected samples including deep Chandra and new COSMOS data, capable to efficiently measure the 1 ryd comoving AGN emissivity up to $z\sim5-6$ and down to five magnitudes fainter than probed by current optical surveys, without any luminosity extrapolation. We find good agreement between the logN$\rm{_H}\lesssim21-22$ cm$^{-2}$ X-ray LF and the optically-selected QSO LF at all redshifts for $M_{1450}\leq -23$. The full range of the logN$\rm{_H}\lesssim21-22$ cm$^{-2}$ LF ($M_{1450} \leq -17$) was then used to quantify the contribution of AGN to the photon budget critical value needed to keep the Universe ionized. We find that the contribution of ionizing AGN at $z = 6$ is as small as 1\% - 7\%, and very unlikely to be greater than 30\%, thus excluding an AGN-dominated reionization scenario.
  • We present the measurement of the projected and redshift space 2-point correlation function (2pcf) of the new catalog of Chandra COSMOS-Legacy AGN at 2.9$\leq$z$\leq$5.5 ($\langle L_{bol} \rangle \sim$10$^{46}$ erg/s) using the generalized clustering estimator based on phot-z probability distribution functions (Pdfs) in addition to any available spec-z. We model the projected 2pcf estimated using $\pi_{max}$ = 200 h$^{-1}$ Mpc with the 2-halo term and we derive a bias at z$\sim$3.4 equal to b = 6.6$^{+0.60}_{-0.55}$, which corresponds to a typical mass of the hosting halos of log M$_h$ = 12.83$^{+0.12}_{-0.11}$ h$^{-1}$ M$_{\odot}$. A similar bias is derived using the redshift-space 2pcf, modelled including the typical phot-z error $\sigma_z$ = 0.052 of our sample at z$\geq$2.9. Once we integrate the projected 2pcf up to $\pi_{max}$ = 200 h$^{-1}$ Mpc, the bias of XMM and \textit{Chandra} COSMOS at z=2.8 used in Allevato et al. (2014) is consistent with our results at higher redshift. The results suggest only a slight increase of the bias factor of COSMOS AGN at z$\gtrsim$3 with the typical hosting halo mass of moderate luminosity AGN almost constant with redshift and equal to logM$_h$ = 12.92$^{+0.13}_{-0.18}$ at z=2.8 and log M$_h$ = 12.83$^{+0.12}_{-0.11}$ at z$\sim$3.4, respectively. The observed redshift evolution of the bias of COSMOS AGN implies that moderate luminosity AGN still inhabit group-sized halos at z$\gtrsim$3, but slightly less massive than observed in different independent studies using X-ray AGN at z$\leq2$.
  • We present the largest high-redshift (3<z<6.85) sample of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) on a contiguous field, using sources detected in the Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey. The sample contains 174 sources, 87 with spectroscopic redshift, the other 87 with photometric redshift (z_phot). In this work we treat z_phot as a probability weighted sum of contributions, adding to our sample the contribution of sources with z_phot<3 but z_phot probability distribution >0 at z>3. We compute the number counts in the observed 0.5-2 keV band, finding a decline in the number of sources at z>3 and constraining phenomenological models of X-ray background. We compute the AGN space density at z>3 in two different luminosity bins. At higher luminosities (logL(2-10 keV) > 44.1 erg/s) the space density declines exponentially, dropping by a factor ~20 from z~3 to z~6. The observed decline is ~80% steeper at lower luminosities (43.55 erg/s < logL(2-10 keV) < 44.1 erg/s), from z~3 to z~4.5. We study the space density evolution dividing our sample in optically classified Type 1 and Type 2 AGN. At logL(2-10 keV) > 44.1 erg/s, unobscured and obscured objects may have different evolution with redshift, the obscured component being three times higher at z~5. Finally, we compare our space density with predictions of quasar activation merger models, whose calibration is based on optically luminous AGN. These models significantly overpredict the number of expected AGN at logL(2-10 keV) > 44.1 erg/s with respect to our data.
  • [abridged] We quantify the evolution of the stellar mass functions of star-forming and quiescent galaxies as a function of morphology from $z\sim 3$ to the present. Our sample consists of ~50,000 galaxies in the CANDELS fields ($\sim880$ $arcmin^2$), which we divide into four main morphological types, i.e. pure bulge dominated systems, pure spiral disk dominated, intermediate 2-component bulge+disk systems and irregular disturbed galaxies. Our main results are: Star-formation: At $z\sim 2$, 80\% of the stellar mass density of star-forming galaxies is in irregular systems. However, by $z\sim 0.5$, irregular objects only dominate at stellar masses below $10^9M\odot$. A majority of the star-forming irregulars present at $z\sim 2$ undergo a gradual transformation from disturbed to normal spiral disk morphologies by $z\sim 1$ without significant interruption to their star-formation. Rejuvenation after a quenching event does not seem to be common except perhaps for the most massive objects. Quenching: We confirm that galaxies reaching a stellar mass of $M_*\sim10^{10.8}M_\odot$ ($M^*$) tend to quench. Also, quenching implies the presence of a bulge: the abundance of massive red disks is negligible at all redshifts over 2~dex in stellar mass. However the dominant quenching mechanism evolves. At $z>2$, the SMF of quiescent galaxies above $M^*$ is dominated by compact spheroids. Quenching at this early epoch destroys the disk and produces a compact remnant unless the star-forming progenitors at even higher redshifts are significantly more dense. At $1<z<2$, the majority of newly quenched galaxies are disks with a significant central bulge. This suggests that mass-quenching at this epoch starts from the inner parts and preserves the disk. At $z<1$, the high mass end of the passive SMF is globally in place and the evolution mostly happens at stellar masses below $10^{10}M_\odot$.
  • Supermassive black hole -- host galaxy relations are key to the computation of the expected gravitational wave background (GWB) in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band. It has been recently pointed out that standard relations adopted in GWB computations are in fact biased-high. We show that when this selection bias is taken into account, the expected GWB in the PTA band is a factor of about three smaller than previously estimated. Compared to other scaling relations recently published in the literature, the median amplitude of the signal at $f=1$yr$^{-1}$ drops from $1.3\times10^{-15}$ to $4\times10^{-16}$. Although this solves any potential tension between theoretical predictions and recent PTA limits without invoking other dynamical effects (such as stalling, eccentricity or strong coupling with the galactic environment), it also makes the GWB detection more challenging.
  • We present a census of the active black hole population at 1<z<2, by constructing the bivariate distribution function of black hole mass and Eddington ratio, employing a maximum likelihood fitting technique. The study of the active black hole mass function (BHMF) and the Eddington ratio distribution function (ERDF) allows us to clearly disentangle the active galactic nuclei (AGN) downsizing phenomenon, present in the AGN luminosity function, into its physical processes of black hole mass downsizing and accretion rate evolution. We are utilizing type-1 AGN samples from three optical surveys (VVDS, zCOSMOS and SDSS), that cover a wide range of 3 dex in luminosity over our redshift interval of interest. We investigate the cosmic evolution of the AGN population as a function of AGN luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rate. Compared to z = 0, we find a distinct change in the shape of the BHMF and the ERDF, consistent with downsizing in black hole mass. The active fraction or duty cycle of type-1 AGN at z~1.5 is almost flat as a function of black hole mass, while it shows a strong decrease with increasing mass at z=0. We are witnessing a phase of intense black hole growth, which is largely driven by the onset of AGN activity in massive black holes towards z=2. We finally compare our results to numerical simulations and semi-empirical models and while we find reasonable agreement over certain parameter ranges, we highlight the need to refine these models in order to match our observations.
  • We investigate, for the first time at z~3, the clustering properties of 189 Type 1 and 157 Type 2 X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGN) of moderate luminosity (log<Lbol> = 45.3 erg/s), with photometric or spectroscopic redshifts in the range 2.2<z<6.8. These samples are based on Chandra and XMM-Newton data in COSMOS. We find that Type 1 and Type 2 COSMOS AGN at z=3 inhabit DMHs with typical mass of logMh = 12.84+0.10/-0.11 and 11.73+0.39/-0.45 Msun/h, respectively. This result requires a drop in the halo masses of Type 1 and 2 COSMOS AGN at z~3 compared to z<2 XMM COSMOS AGN with similar luminosities. Additionally, we infer that unobscured COSMOS AGN at z~3 reside in 10 times more massive halos compared to obscured COSMOS AGN, at 2.6sigma level. This result extends to z~3 that found in COSMOS at z<2, and rules out the picture in which obscuration is purely an orientation effect. A model which assumes that the AGN activity is triggered by major mergers is quite successful in predicting both the low halo mass of COSMOS AGN and the typical mass of luminous SDSS quasars at z~3, with the latter inhabiting more massive halos respect to moderate luminosity AGN. Alternatively we can argue, at least for Type 1 COSMOS AGN, that they are possibly representative of an early phase of fast (i.e. Eddington limited) BH growth induced by cosmic cold flows or disk instabilities. Given the moderate luminosity, these new fast growing BHs have masses of e7-8 Msun at z~3 which might evolve into e8.5-9 Msun mass BHs at z=0. Following our clustering measurements, we argue that this fast BH growth at z~3 in AGN with moderate luminosity occurs in DMHs with typical mass of 6 times e12 Msun/h.
  • We study of the role of major mergers (mass ratios >1:4) in driving size growth in high-redshift (1<z<2) spheroidal galaxies (SGs) with stellar masses between 10^9.5 MSun and 10^10.7 MSun. This is a largely unexplored mass range at this epoch, containing the progenitors of more massive SGs on which the bulk of the size-evolution literature is based. We visually split our SGs into systems that are relaxed and those that exhibit tidal features indicative of a recent merger. Numerical simulations indicate that, given the depth of our images, only tidal features due to major mergers will be detectable at these epochs (features from minor mergers being too faint), making the disturbed SGs a useful route for estimating major-merger-driven size growth. The disturbed SGs are offset in size from their relaxed counterparts, lying close to the upper envelope of the local size -- mass relation. The mean size ratio of the disturbed SGs to their relaxed counterparts is ~2. Combining this observed size growth with empirical major-merger histories from the literature suggests that the size evolution of a significant fraction (around two-thirds) of SGs in this mass range could be driven by major mergers. If, as is likely, our galaxies are progenitors of more massive M > 10^10.7 MSun SGs at z<1, then major mergers are also likely to play an important role in the size growth of at least some massive SGs in this mass range.
  • We quantify the systematics in the size-luminosity relation of galaxies in the SDSS main sample which arise from fitting different 1- and 2-component model profiles to the images. In objects brighter than L*, fitting a single Sersic profile to what is really a two-component SerExp system leads to biases: the half-light radius is increasingly overestimated as n of the fitted single component increases; it is also overestimated at B/T ~ 0.6. However, the net effect on the R-L relation is small, except for the most luminous tail, where it curves upwards towards larger sizes. We also study how this relation depends on morphological type. Our analysis is one of the first to use Bayesian-classifier derived weights, rather than hard cuts, to define morphology. Crudely, there appear to be only two relations: one for early-types (Es, S0s and Sa's) and another for late-types (Sbs and Scds). However, closer inspection shows that within the early-type sample S0s tend to be 15% smaller than Es of the same luminosity, and, among faint late types, Sbs are more than 25% smaller than Scds. Neither the early- nor the late-type relations are pure power-laws: both show significant curvature, which we quantify. However, the R-L relations of the bulges of early-types are almost pure power laws. Our analysis confirms that two mass scales are special for early-type galaxies: M* = 3e10 and 2e11 Msun. These same mass scales are also special for late types: there is almost no correlation between R and M* below the former, and almost no late-types above the latter. We also show that the intrinsic scatter around the relation decreases at large luminosity and/or stellar mass; this should provide additional constraints on models of how the most massive galaxies formed.
  • We show that recently documented trends in galaxy sizes with mass and redshift can be understood in terms of the influence of underlying cosmic evolution; a holistic view which is complimentary to interpretations involving the accumulation of discreet evolutionary processes acting on individual objects. Using standard cosmology theory, supported with results from the Millennium simulations, we derive expected size trends for collapsed cosmic structures, emphasising the important distinction between these trends and the assembly paths of individual regions. We then argue that the observed variation in the stellar mass content of these structures can be understood to first order in terms of natural limitations of cooling and feedback. But whilst these relative masses vary by orders of magnitude, galaxy and host radii have been found to correlate linearly. We explain how these two aspects will lead to galaxy sizes that closely follow observed trends and their evolution, comparing directly with the COSMOS and SDSS surveys. Thus we conclude that the observed minimum radius for galaxies, the evolving trend in size as a function of mass for intermediate systems, and the observed increase in the sizes of massive galaxies, may all be considered an emergent consequence of the cosmic expansion.
  • In addition to the large systematic differences arising from assumptions about the stellar mass-to-light ratio, the massive end of the stellar mass function is rather sensitive to how one fits the light profiles of the most luminous galaxies. We quantify this by comparing the luminosity and stellar mass functions based on SDSS cmodel magnitudes, and PyMorph single-Sersic and Sersic-Exponential fits to the surface brightness profiles of galaxies in the SDSS. The PyMorph fits return more light, so that the predicted masses are larger than when cmodel magnitudes are used. As a result, the total stellar mass density at z~0.1 is about 1.2x larger than in our previous analysis of the SDSS. The differences are most pronounced at the massive end, where the measured number density of objects having M* > 6 x 10^{11} Msun is ~5x larger. Alternatively, at number densities of 10^{-6} Mpc^{-3}, the limiting stellar mass is 2x larger. The differences with respect to fits by other authors, typically based on Petrosian-like magnitudes, are even more dramatic, although some of these differences are due to sky-subtraction problems, and are sometimes masked by large differences in the assumed $M_*/L$ (even after scaling to the same IMF). Our results impact studies of the growth and assembly of stellar mass in galaxies, and of the relation between stellar and halo mass, so we provide simple analytic fits to these new luminosity and stellar mass functions and quantify how they depend on morphology, as well as the binned counts in electronic format.
  • [abridged] The mass-size relation of early-type galaxies (ETGs) has been largely studied in the last years to probe the mass assembly of the most massive objects in the Universe. In this paper, we focus on the mass-size relation of quiescent massive ETGs (Mstar/Msol > 3*10^10) living in massive clusters (M200 ~ 10^14 Mstar) at 0.8< z <1.5, as compared to those living in the field at the same epoch. Our sample contains ~ 400 ETGs in clusters and the same number in the field. Therefore, our sample is approximately an order of magnitude larger than previous studies in the same redshift range for galaxy clusters. We find that ETGs living in clusters are between ~30-50% larger than galaxies with the same stellar mass residing in the field. We parametrize the size using the mass-normalized size, gamma=Re/Mstar^0.57. The gamma distributions in both environments peak at the same position but the distributions in clusters are more skewed towards larger sizes. Since this size difference is not observed in the local Universe, the size evolution at fixed stellar mass from z~1.5 of cluster galaxies is less steep ((1+z)-0.53pm0.04) than the evolution of field galaxies ((1+z)-0.92pm0.04). The size difference seems to be essentially driven by the galaxies residing in the clusters cores (R<0.5*R200). If part of the size evolution is due to mergers, the difference we see between cluster and field galaxies could be due to higher merger rates in clusters at higher redshift, probably during the formation phase of the clusters when velocity dispersions are lower. We cannot exclude however that the difference is driven by newly quenched galaxies which are quenched more efficiently in clusters. The implications of these results for the hierarchical growth of ETGs will be discussed in a companion paper.
  • We present the first direct measurement of the mean Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) of X-ray selected AGN in the COSMOS field at z < 1, based on the association of 41 XMM and 17 C-COSMOS AGN with member galaxies of 189 X-ray detected galaxy groups from XMM and Chandra data. We model the mean AGN occupation in the halo mass range logM_200[Msun] = 13-14.5 with a rolling-off power-law with the best fit index alpha = 0.06(-0.22;0.36) and normalization parameter f_a = 0.05(0.04;0.06). We find the mean HOD of AGN among central galaxies to be modelled by a softened step function at logMh > logMmin = 12.75 (12.10,12.95) Msun while for the satellite AGN HOD we find a preference for an increasing AGN fraction with Mh suggesting that the average number of AGN in satellite galaxies grows slower (alpha_s < 0.6) than the linear proportion (alpha_s = 1) observed for the satellite HOD of samples of galaxies. We present an estimate of the projected auto correlation function (ACF) of galaxy groups over the range of r_p = 0.1-40 Mpc/h at <z> = 0.5. We use the large-scale clustering signal to verify the agreement between the group bias estimated by using the observed galaxy groups ACF and the value derived from the group mass estimates. We perform a measurement of the projected AGN-galaxy group cross-correlation function, excluding from the analysis AGN that are within galaxy groups and we model the 2-halo term of the clustering signal with the mean AGN HOD based on our results.
  • Using the wide multi-band photometry available in the COSMOS field we explore the host galaxy properties of a large sample of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) obtained by combining X-ray and optical spectroscopic selections. Based on a careful study of their Spectral Energy Distribution (SED), which has been parametrized using a 2-component (AGN+galaxy) model fit, we derived dust-corrected rest-frame magnitudes, colors, stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). We find that AGN hosts span a large range of stellar masses and SFRs. No color-bimodality is seen at any redshift in the AGN hosts, which are found to be mainly massive, red galaxies. Once accounting for the color-mass degeneracy in well defined mass-matched samples, we find a residual marginal enhancement of AGN incidence in redder galaxies with lower specific star formation rates, and we argue that this result might emerge because of our ability to properly account for AGN light contamination and dust extinction. Interestingly, we find that the probability for a galaxy to host a black hole growing at any given "specific accretion rate" (i.e. the ratio of X-ray luminosity to the host stellar mass) is almost independent of the host galaxy mass, while it decreases as a power-law with Lx/M. By analyzing the normalization of such probability distribution, we show how the incidence of AGN increases with redshift as rapidly as (1+z)^4, in close resemblance with the overall evolution of the specific star formation rate of the entire galaxy population. Although AGN activity and star formation in galaxies do appear to have a common triggering mechanism, at least in a statistical sense, within the COSMOS sample we do not find strong evidence of any 'smoking gun' signaling powerful AGN influence on the star-forming properties of their hosts galaxies.
  • Bolometric luminosities and Eddington ratios of both X-ray selected broad-line (Type-1) and narrow-line (Type-2) AGN from the XMM-Newton survey in the COSMOS field are presented. The sample is composed by 929 AGN (382 Type-1 AGN and 547 Type-2 AGN) and it covers a wide range of redshifts, X-ray luminosities and absorbing column densities. About 65% of the sources are spectroscopically identified as either Type-1 or Type-2 AGN (83% and 52% respectively), while accurate photometric redshifts are available for the rest of the sample. The study of such a large sample of X-ray selected AGN with a high quality multi-wavelength coverage from the far-infrared (now with the inclusion of Herschel data at 100 micron and 160 micron) to the optical-UV allows us to obtain accurate estimates of bolometric luminosities, bolometric corrections and Eddington ratios. The kbol-Lbol relations derived in the present work are calibrated for the first time against a sizable AGN sample, and rely on observed redshifts, X-ray luminosities and column density distributions. We find that kbol is significantly lower at high Lbol with respect to previous estimates by Marconi et al. (2004) and Hopkins et al. (2007). Black hole masses and Eddington ratios are available for 170 Type-1 AGN, while black hole masses for Type-2 AGN are computed for 481 objects using the black hole mass-stellar mass relation and the morphological information. We confirm a trend between kbol and lambda_Edd, with lower hard X-ray bolometric corrections at lower Eddington ratios for both Type-1 and Type-2 AGN. We find that, on average, Eddington ratio increases with redshift for all Types of AGN at any given Mbh, while no clear evolution with redshift is seen at any given Lbol.
  • There is mounting evidence that a significant fraction of Black Holes (BHs) today live in late-type galaxies, including bulge-less galaxies and those hosting pseudobulges, and are significantly undermassive with respect to the scaling relations followed by their counterpart BHs in classical bulges of similar stellar (or even bulge) mass. Here we discuss the predictions of two state-of-the-art hierarchical galaxy formation models in which BHs grow via mergers and, in one, also via disk instability. Our aim is to understand if the wealth of new data on local BH demography is consistent with standard models. We follow the merger trees of representative subsamples of BHs and compute the fractional contributions of different processes to the final BH mass. We show that the model in which BHs always closely follow the growth of their host bulges, also during late disk instabilities (i.e., bars), produces too narrow a distribution of BHs at fixed stellar mass to account for the numerous low-mass BHs now detected in later-type galaxies. Models with a looser connection between BH growth and bar instability instead predict the existence of a larger number of undermassive BHs, in better agreement with the observations. The scatter in the updated local BH-bulge mass relation (with no restriction on galaxy type) appears to be quite large when including later-type systems, but it can still be managed to be reproduced within current hierarchical models. However, the fuelling of BHs during the late bar-instability mode needs to be better quantified/improved to properly fit the data. We conclude discussing how the possibly large number of BHs in later type galaxies demands for an in-depth revision of the local BH mass function and its modelling.