• We investigate the light-curve properties of a sample of 26 spectroscopically confirmed hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) in the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey. These events are brighter than SNe Ib/c and SNe Ic-BL, on average, by about 4 and 2~mag, respectively. The peak absolute magnitudes of SLSNe-I in rest-frame $g$ band span $-22\lesssim M_g \lesssim-20$~mag, and these peaks are not powered by radioactive $^{56}$Ni, unless strong asymmetries are at play. The rise timescales are longer for SLSNe than for normal SNe Ib/c, by roughly 10 days, for events with similar decay times. Thus, SLSNe-I can be considered as a separate population based on photometric properties. After peak, SLSNe-I decay with a wide range of slopes, with no obvious gap between rapidly declining and slowly declining events. The latter events show more irregularities (bumps) in the light curves at all times. At late times, the SLSN-I light curves slow down and cluster around the $^{56}$Co radioactive decay rate. Powering the late-time light curves with radioactive decay would require between 1 and 10${\rm M}_\odot$ of Ni masses. Alternatively, a simple magnetar model can reasonably fit the majority of SLSNe-I light curves, with four exceptions, and can mimic the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Co, up to $\sim400$ days from explosion. The resulting spin values do not correlate with the host-galaxy metallicities. Finally, the analysis of our sample cannot strengthen the case for using SLSNe-I for cosmology.
  • We performed a wide-area (2000 deg$^{2}$) g and I band experiment as part of a two month extension to the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory. We discovered 36 extragalactic transients including iPTF17lf, a highly reddened local SN Ia, iPTF17bkj, a new member of the rare class of transitional Ibn/IIn supernovae, and iPTF17be, a candidate luminous blue variable outburst. We do not detect any luminous red novae and place an upper limit on their rate. We show that adding a slow-cadence I band component to upcoming surveys such as the Zwicky Transient Facility will improve the photometric selection of cool and dusty transients.
  • Wide-field surveys are discovering a growing number of rare transients whose physical origin is not yet well understood. Here, we present optical and UV data and analysis of iPTF16asu, a luminous, rapidly-evolving, high velocity, stripped-envelope supernova. With a rest-frame rise-time of just 4 days and a peak absolute magnitude of $M_{\rm g}=-20.4$ mag, the light curve of iPTF16asu is faster and more luminous than previous rapid transients. The spectra of iPTF16asu show a featureless, blue continuum near peak that develops into a Type Ic-BL spectrum on the decline. We show that while the late-time light curve could plausibly be powered by $^{56}$Ni decay, the early emission requires a different energy source. Non-detections in the X-ray and radio strongly constrain any associated gamma-ray burst to be low-luminosity. We suggest that the early emission may have been powered by either a rapidly spinning-down magnetar, or by shock breakout in an extended envelope of a very energetic explosion. In either scenario a central engine is required, making iPTF16asu an intriguing transition object between superluminous supernovae, Type Ic-BL supernovae, and low-energy gamma-ray bursts.
  • We present our analysis of the Type II supernova DLT16am (SN~2016ija). The object was discovered during the ongoing $\rm{D}<40\,\rm{Mpc}$ (DLT40) one day cadence supernova search at $r\sim20.1\,\rm{mag}$ in the `edge-on' nearby ($D=20.0\pm1.9\,\rm{Mpc}$) galaxy NGC~1532. The subsequent prompt and high-cadenced spectroscopic and photometric follow-up revealed a highly extincted transient, with $E(B-V)=1.95\pm0.15\,\rm{mag}$, consistent with a standard extinction law with $R_V=3.1$ and a bright ($M_V=-18.49\pm0.65\,\rm{mag}$) absolute peak-magnitude. The comparison of the photometric features with those of large samples of Type II supernovae reveals a fast rise for the derived luminosity and a relatively short plateau phase, with a slope of $S_{50V}=0.84\pm0.04\,\rm{mag}/50\,\rm{d}$ consistent with the photometric properties typical of those of fast declining Type II supernovae. Despite the large uncertainties on the distance and the extinction in the direction of DLT16am, the measured photospheric expansion velocity and the derived absolute $V$-band magnitude at $\sim50\,\rm{d}$ after the explosion match the existing luminosity-velocity relation for Type II supernovae.
  • S. J. Smartt, T.-W. Chen, A. Jerkstrand, M. Coughlin, E. Kankare, S. A. Sim, M. Fraser, C. Inserra, K. Maguire, K. C. Chambers, M. E. Huber, T. Kruhler, G. Leloudas, M. Magee, L. J. Shingles, K. W. Smith, D. R. Young, J. Tonry, R. Kotak, A. Gal-Yam, J. D. Lyman, D. S. Homan, C. Agliozzo, J. P. Anderson, C. R. Angus C. Ashall, C. Barbarino, F. E. Bauer, M. Berton, M. T. Botticella, M. Bulla, J. Bulger, G. Cannizzaro, Z. Cano, R. Cartier, A. Cikota, P. Clark, A. De Cia, M. Della Valle, L. Denneau, M. Dennefeld, L. Dessart, G. Dimitriadis, N. Elias-Rosa, R. E. Firth, H. Flewelling, A. Flors, A. Franckowiak, C. Frohmaier, L. Galbany, S. Gonzalez-Gaitan, J. Greiner, M. Gromadzki, A. Nicuesa Guelbenzu, C. P. Gutierrez, A. Hamanowicz, L. Hanlon, J. Harmanen, K. E. Heintz, A. Heinze, M.-S. Hernandez, S. T. Hodgkin, I. M. Hook, L. Izzo, P. A. James, P. G. Jonker, W. E. Kerzendorf, S. Klose, Z. Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, M. Kowalski, M. Kromer, H. Kuncarayakti, A. Lawrence, T. B. Lowe, E. A. Magnier, I. Manulis, A. Martin-Carrillo, S. Mattila, O. McBrien, A. Muller, J. Nordin, D. O'Neill, F. Onori, J. T. Palmerio, A. Pastorello, F. Patat, G. Pignata, Ph. Podsiadlowski, M. L. Pumo, S. J. Prentice, A. Rau, A. Razza, A. Rest, T. Reynolds, R. Roy, A. J. Ruiter, K. A. Rybicki, L. Salmon, P. Schady, A. S. B. Schultz, T. Schweyer, I. R. Seitenzahl, M. Smith, J. Sollerman, B. Stalder, C. W. Stubbs, M. Sullivan, H. Szegedi, F. Taddia, S. Taubenberger, G. Terreran, B. van Soelen, J. Vos, R. J. Wainscoat, N. A. Walton, C. Waters, H. Weiland, M. Willman, P. Wiseman, D. E. Wright, L. Wyrzykowski, O. Yaron
    Oct. 17, 2017 astro-ph.HE
    Gravitational waves were discovered with the detection of binary black hole mergers and they should also be detectable from lower mass neutron star mergers. These are predicted to eject material rich in heavy radioactive isotopes that can power an electromagnetic signal called a kilonova. The gravitational wave source GW170817 arose from a binary neutron star merger in the nearby Universe with a relatively well confined sky position and distance estimate. Here we report observations and physical modelling of a rapidly fading electromagnetic transient in the galaxy NGC4993, which is spatially coincident with GW170817 and a weak short gamma-ray burst. The transient has physical parameters broadly matching the theoretical predictions of blue kilonovae from neutron star mergers. The emitted electromagnetic radiation can be explained with an ejected mass of 0.04 +/- 0.01 Msol, with an opacity of kappa <= 0.5 cm2/gm at a velocity of 0.2 +/- 0.1c. The power source is constrained to have a power law slope of beta = -1.2 +/- 0.3, consistent with radioactive powering from r-process nuclides. We identify line features in the spectra that are consistent with light r-process elements (90 < A < 140). As it fades, the transient rapidly becomes red, and emission may have contribution by a higher opacity, lanthanide-rich ejecta component. This indicates that neutron star mergers produce gravitational waves, radioactively powered kilonovae, and are a nucleosynthetic source of the r-process elements.
  • We present our study of OGLE-2014-SN-073, one of the brightest Type II SN ever discovered, with an unusually broad lightcurve combined with high ejecta velocities. From our hydrodynamical modelling we infer a remarkable ejecta mass of $60^{+42}_{-16}$~M$_\odot$, and a relatively high explosion energy of $12.4^{+13.0}_{-5.9} \times10^{51}$~erg. We show that this object belongs, with a very small number of other hydrogen-rich SNe, to an energy regime that is not explained by standard core-collapse (CC) neutrino-driven explosions. We compare the quantities inferred by the hydrodynamical modelling with the expectations of various exploding scenarios, trying to explain the high energy and luminosity released. We find some qualitative similarities with pair-instabilities SNe, although a prompt injection of energy by a magnetar seems also a viable alternative to explain such extreme event.
  • We study PTF11mnb, a He-poor supernova (SN) whose pre-peak light curves (LCs) resemble those of SN 2005bf, a peculiar double-peaked stripped-envelope (SE) SN. LCs, colors and spectral properties are compared to those of SN 2005bf and normal SE SNe. A bolometric LC is built and modeled with the SNEC hydrodynamical code explosion of a MESA progenitor star, as well as with semi-analytic models. The LC of PTF11mnb turns out to be similar to that of SN 2005bf until $\sim$50 d, when the main (secondary) peaks occur at $-18.5$ mag. The early peak occurs at $\sim$20 d, and is about 1.0 mag fainter. After the main peak, the decline rate of PTF11mnb is remarkably slower than that of SN 2005bf, and it traces the $^{56}$Co decay rate. The spectra of PTF11mnb reveal no traces of He unlike in the case of SN Ib 2005bf. The bolometric LC is well reproduced by the explosion of a massive ($M_{ej} =$ 7.8 $M_{\odot}$), He-poor star with a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, a total $^{56}$Ni mass of 0.59 $M_{\odot}$ and an explosion energy of 2.2$\times$10$^{51}$ erg. Alternatively, a normal SN Ib/c explosion [M($^{56}$Ni)$=$0.11 $M_{\odot}$, $E_{K}$ = 0.2$\times$10$^{51}$ erg, $M_{ej} =$ 1 $M_{\odot}$] can power the first peak while a magnetar ($B$=5.0$\times$10$^{14}$ G, $P=18.1$ ms) provides energy for the main peak. The early $g$-band LC implies a radius of at least 30 $R_{\odot}$. If PTF11mnb arose from a massive He-poor star characterized by a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, the ejecta mass and the absence of He imply a large ZAMS mass ($\sim85 M_{\odot}$) for the progenitor, which most likely was a Wolf-Rayet star, surrounded by an extended envelope formed either by a pre-SN eruption or due to a binary configuration. Alternatively, PTF11mnb could be powered by a normal SE SN during the first peak and by a magnetar afterwards.
  • A Type IIn supernova (SN) is dominated by the interaction of SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium (CSM). Some SNe IIn (e.g., SN 2006jd) have episodes of re-brightening ("bumps") in their light curves. We present iPTF13z, a SN IIn discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) and characterised by several bumps in its light curve. We analyse this peculiar behaviour trying to infer the properties of the CSM and of the SN explosion, as well as the nature of its progenitor star. We obtained multi-band optical photometry for over 1000 days after discovery with the P48 and P60 telescopes at Palomar Observatory. We obtained low-resolution optical spectra in the same period. We did an archival search for progenitor outbursts. We analyse our photometry and spectra, and compare iPTF13z to other SNe IIn. A simple analytical model is used to estimate properties of the CSM. iPTF13z was a SN IIn showing a light curve with five bumps during its decline phase. The bumps had amplitudes between 0.4 and 0.9 mag and durations between 20 and 120 days. The most prominent bumps appeared in all our different optical bands. The spectra showed typical SN IIn characteristics, with emission lines of H$\alpha$ (with broad component FWHM ~$10^{3}-10^{4} ~{\rm ~km ~s^{-1}}$ and narrow component FWHM ~$10^2 \rm ~km ~s^{-1}$) and He I, but also with Fe II, Ca II, Na I D and H$\beta$ P-Cygni profiles (with velocities of ~$10^{3}$ ${\rm ~km ~s^{-1}}$). A pre-explosion outburst was identified lasting $\gtrsim 50$ days, with $M_r \approx -15$ mag around 210 days before discovery. Large, variable progenitor mass-loss rates (~> 0.01 $M_{\odot} \rm ~yr^{-1}$) and CSM densities (~> 10$^{-16}$ g cm$^{-3}$) are derived. We suggest that the light curve bumps of iPTF13z arose from SN ejecta interacting with denser regions in the CSM, possibly produced by the eruptions of a luminous blue variable star.
  • We present an analysis of ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared observations of the fast-declining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) 2007on and 2011iv, hosted by the Fornax cluster member NGC 1404. The B-band light curves of SN 2007on and SN 2011iv are characterised by dm_15(B) decline-rate values of 1.96 mag and 1.77 mag, respectively. Although they have similar decline rates, their peak B- and H-band magnitudes differ by ~0.60 mag and ~0.35 mag, respectively. After correcting for the luminosity vs. decline rate and the luminosity vs. colour relations, the peak B-band and H-band light curves provide distances that differ by ~14% and ~9%, respectively. These findings serve as a cautionary tale for the use of transitional SNe Ia located in early-type hosts in the quest to measure cosmological parameters. Interestingly, even though SN 2011iv is brighter and bluer at early times, by three weeks past maximum and extending over several months, its B-V colour is 0.12 mag redder than that of SN 2007on. To reconcile this unusual behaviour, we turn to guidance from a suite of spherical one-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation explosion models. In this context, 56Ni production depends on both the so-called transition density and the central density of the progenitor white dwarf. To first order, the transition density drives the luminosity-width relation, while the central density is an important second-order parameter. Within this context, the differences in the B-V color evolution along the Lira regime suggests the progenitor of SN~2011iv had a higher central density than SN~2007on.
  • The first phase of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) was a dedicated supernova follow-up program based at the Las Campanas Observatory that collected science data of young, low-redshift supernovae between 2004 and 2009. Presented in this paper is the CSP-I photometric data release of low-redshift stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae. The data consist of optical (uBgVri) photometry of 34 objects, with a subset of 26 having near-infrared (YJH) photometry. Twenty objects have optical pre-maximum coverage with a subset of 12 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of B-band maximum brightness. In the near-infrared, 17 objects have pre-maximum observations with a subset of 14 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of J-band maximum brightness. Analysis of this photometric data release is presented in companion papers focusing on techniques to estimate host-galaxy extinction (Stritzinger et al., submitted) and the light-curve and progenitor star properties of the sample (Taddia et al., submitted). The analysis of an accompanying visual-wavelength spectroscopy sample of ~150 spectra will be the subject of a future paper.
  • Stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe) include H-poor (Type IIb), H-free (Type Ib) and He-free (Type Ic) events thought to be associated with the deaths of massive stars. The exact nature of their progenitors is a matter of debate. Here we present the analysis of the light curves of 34 SE SNe published by the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I), which are unparalleled in terms of photometric accuracy and wavelength range. Light-curve parameters are estimated through the fits of an analytical function and trends are searched for among the resulting fit parameters. We found a tentative correlation between the peak absolute $B$-band magnitude and $\Delta m_{15}(B)$, as well as a correlation between the late-time linear slope and $\Delta m_{15}$. Making use of the full set of optical and near-IR photometry, combined with robust host-galaxy extinction corrections, bolometric light curves are constructed and compared to both analytic and hydrodynamical models. From the hydrodynamical models we obtained ejecta masses of $1.1-6.2$ $M_{\odot}$, $^{56}$Ni masses of $0.03-0.35$ $M_{\odot}$, and explosion energies (excluding two SNe Ic-BL) of $0.25-3.0\times10^{51}$ erg. Our analysis indicates that adopting $\kappa = 0.07$ cm$^{2}$ g$^{-1}$ as the mean opacity serves to be a suitable assumption when comparing Arnett-model results to those obtained from hydrodynamical calculations. We also find that adopting He I and O I line velocities to infer the expansion velocity in He-rich and He-poor SNe, respectively, provides ejecta masses relatively similar to those obtained by using the Fe II line velocities. The inferred ejecta masses are compatible with intermediate mass ($M_{ZAMS} \leq 20$ $M_{\odot}$) progenitor stars in binary systems for the majority of SE SNe. Furthermore, the majority of our SNe is affected by significant mixing of $^{56}$Ni, particularly in the case of SNe Ic.
  • We aim to improve upon contemporary methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe). To this end the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) SE SNe photometry data release, consisting of nearly three dozen objects, is used to identify a minimally reddened sub-sample for each traditionally defined spectroscopic sub-types (i.e, SNe~IIb, SNe~Ib, SNe~Ic). Inspection of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) colors and color evolution of the minimally reddened sub-samples reveals a high degree of homogeneity, particularly between 0d to +20d relative to B-band maximum. This motivated the construction of intrinsic color-curve templates, which when compared to the colors of reddened SE SNe, yields an entire suite of optical and NIR color excess measurements. Comparison of optical/optical vs. optical/NIR color excess measurements indicates the majority of the CSP-I SE SNe suffer relatively low amounts of reddening and we find evidence for different R_(V)^(host) values among different SE SN. Fitting the color excess measurements of the seven most reddened objects with the Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model provides robust estimates of the host visual-extinction A_(V)^(host) and R_(V)^(host). In the case of the SE SNe with relatively low amounts of reddening, a preferred value of R_(V)^(host) is adopted for each sub-type, resulting in estimates of A_(V)^(host) through Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model fits to the observed color excess measurements. Our analysis suggests SE SNe reside in galaxies characterized by a range of dust properties. We also find evidence SNe Ic are more likely to occur in regions characterized by larger R_(V)^(host) values compared to SNe IIb/Ib and they also tend to suffer more extinction. These findings are consistent with work in the literature suggesting SNe Ic tend to occur in regions of on-going star formation.
  • SN 2002cx-like Type Ia supernovae (also known as SNe Iax) represent one of the most numerous peculiar SN classes. They differ from normal SNe Ia by having fainter peak magnitudes, faster decline rates and lower photospheric velocities, displaying a wide diversity in these properties. We present both integral-field and long-slit visual-wavelength spectroscopy of the host galaxies and explosion sites of SNe Iax to provide constraints on their progenitor formation scenarios. The SN Iax explosion site metallicity distribution is similar to that of core-collapse (CC) SNe and metal-poor compared to normal SNe Ia. Fainter members, speculated to form distinctly from brighter SN Iax, are found at a range of metallicities, extending to very metal-poor environments. Although the SN Iax explosion sites' ages and star-formation rates are comparatively older and less intense than the distribution of star forming regions across their host galaxies, we confirm the presence of young stellar populations (SP) at explosion environments for most SNe Iax, expanded here to a larger sample. Ages of the young SP (several $\times 10^{7}$ to $10^8$~yrs) are consistent with predictions for young thermonuclear and electron-capture SN progenitors. The lack of extremely young SP at the explosion sites disfavours very massive progenitors such as Wolf-Rayet explosions with significant fall-back. We find weak ionised gas in the only SN Iax host without obvious signs of star-formation. The source of the ionisation remains ambiguous but appears unlikely to be mainly due to young, massive stars.
  • Supernova (SN) 2016bdu is an unusual transient resembling SN 2009ip. SN 2009ip-like events are characterized by a long-lasting phase of erratic variability which ends with two luminous outbursts a few weeks apart. The second outburst is significantly more luminous (about 3 mag) than the first. In the case of SN 2016bdu, the first outburst (Event A) reached an absolute magnitude M(r) ~ -15.3 mag, while the second one (Event B) occurred over one month later and reached M(r) ~ -18 mag. By inspecting archival data, a faint source at the position of SN 2016bdu is detectable several times in the past few years. We interpret these detections as signatures of a phase of erratic variability, similar to that experienced by SN 2009ip between 2008 and mid-2012, and resembling the currently observed variability of the luminous blue variable SN 2000ch in NGC 3432. Spectroscopic monitoring of SN 2016bdu during the second peak initially shows features typical of a SN IIn. One month after the Event B maximum, the spectra develop broad Balmer lines with P Cygni profiles and broad metal features. At these late phases, the spectra resemble those of a typical Type II SN. All members of this SN 2009ip-like group are remarkably similar to the Type IIn SN 2005gl. For this object, the claim of a terminal SN explosion is supported by the disappearance of the progenitor star. The similarity with SN 2005gl suggests that all members of this family may finally explode as genuine SNe, although the unequivocal detection of nucleosynthesised elements in their nebular spectra is still missing.
  • We present the discovery, classification, and radio-to-X-ray follow-up observations of iPTF17cw, a broad-lined (BL) type Ic supernova (SN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). Although unrelated to the gravitational wave trigger, this SN was discovered as a happy by-product of the extensive observational campaign dedicated to the follow-up of Advanced LIGO event GW170104. The spectroscopic properties and inferred peak bolometric luminosity of iPTF17cw are most similar to the gamma-ray burst (GRB) associated SN 1998bw, while the shape of the r-band light curve is most similar to that of the relativistic SN 2009bb. Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the iPTF17cw field reveal a radio counterpart about 10 times less luminous than SN 1998bw, and with peak radio luminosity comparable to that of SN 2006aj/GRB 060218 and SN 2010bh/GRB 100316D. Our radio observations of iPTF17cw imply a relativistically expanding outflow. However, further late-time observations with the VLA in its most extended configuration are needed to confirm fading of iPTF radio counterpart at all frequencies. X-ray observations carried out with Chandra reveal the presence of an X-ray counterpart with luminosity similar to that of SN 2010bh/GRB 100316D. Searching the Fermi catalog for possible gamma-rays reveals that GRB 161228B is spatially and temporally compatible with iPTF17cw. The similarity to SN 1998bw and SN 2009bb, the radio and X-ray detections, and the potential association with GRB 161228B, all point to iPTF17cw being a new candidate member of the rare sample of optically-discovered engine-driven BL-Ic SNe associated with relativistic ejecta.
  • Type Ibn supernovae (SNe Ibn) are thought to be the core-collapse explosions of massive stars whose ejecta interact with He-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report the discovery of a SN Ibn, with the longest rise-time ever observed, OGLE-2014-SN-131. We discuss the potential powering mechanisms and the progenitor nature of this peculiar stripped-envelope (SE), circumstellar-interacting SN. Optical photometry and spectroscopy were obtained with multiple telescopes including VLT, NTT, and GROND. We compare light curves and spectra with those of other known SNe Ibn and Ibc. CSM velocities are derived from the spectral analysis. The SN light curve is modeled under different assumptions about its powering mechanism (${^{56}}$Ni decay, CSM-interaction, magnetar) in order to estimate the SN progenitor parameters. OGLE-2014-SN-131 spectroscopically resembles SNe Ibn such as SN 2010al. Its peak luminosity and post-peak colors are also similar to those of other SNe Ibn. However, it shows an unprecedentedly long rise-time and a much broader light curve compared to other SNe Ibn. Its bolometric light curve can be reproduced by magnetar and CSM-interaction models, but not by a ${^{56}}$Ni-decay powering model. To explain the unusually long rise-time, the broad light curve, the light curve decline, and the spectra characterized by narrow emission lines, we favor a powering mechanism where the SN ejecta are interacting with a dense CSM. The progenitor of OGLE-2014-SN-131 was likely a Wolf-Rayet star with a mass greater than that of a typical SN Ibn progenitor, which expelled the CSM that the SN is interacting with.
  • With the advent of new wide-field, high-cadence optical transient surveys, our understanding of the diversity of core-collapse supernovae has grown tremendously in the last decade. However, the pre-supernova evolution of massive stars, that sets the physical backdrop to these violent events, is theoretically not well understood and difficult to probe observationally. Here we report the discovery of the supernova iPTF13dqy = SN 2013fs, a mere ~3 hr after explosion. Our rapid follow-up observations, which include multiwavelength photometry and extremely early (beginning at ~6 hr post-explosion) spectra, map the distribution of material in the immediate environment (<~ 10^15 cm) of the exploding star and establish that it was surrounded by circumstellar material (CSM) that was ejected during the final ~1 yr prior to explosion at a high rate, around 10^-3 solar masses per year. The complete disappearance of flash-ionised emission lines within the first several days requires that the dense CSM be confined to within <~ 10^15 cm, consistent with radio non-detections at 70--100 days. The observations indicate that iPTF13dqy was a regular Type II SN; thus, the finding that the probable red supergiant (RSG) progenitor of this common explosion ejected material at a highly elevated rate just prior to its demise suggests that pre-supernova instabilities may be common among exploding massive stars.
  • We report initial observations and analysis on the Type IIb SN~2016gkg in the nearby galaxy NGC~613. SN~2016gkg exhibited a clear double-peaked light curve during its early evolution, as evidenced by our intensive photometric follow-up campaign. SN~2016gkg shows strong similarities with other Type IIb SNe, in particular with respect to the \he~emission features observed in both the optical and near infrared. SN~2016gkg evolved faster than the prototypical Type~IIb SN~1993J, with a decline similar to that of SN~2011dh after the first peak. The analysis of archival {\it Hubble Space Telescope} images indicate a pre-explosion source at SN~2016gkg's position, suggesting a progenitor star with a $\sim$mid F spectral type and initial mass $15-20$\msun, depending on the distance modulus adopted for NGC~613. Modeling the temperature evolution within $5\,\rm{days}$ of explosion, we obtain a progenitor radius of $\sim\,48-124$\rsun, smaller than that obtained from the analysis of the pre-explosion images ($240-320$\rsun).
  • Long duration gamma-ray bursts are a rare subclass of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae that launch collimated relativistic outflows (jets). All gamma-ray-burst-associated supernovae are spectroscopically of Type Ic with broad lines, but the fraction of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae harboring low-luminosity gamma-ray-burst remains largely unconstrained. Some supernovae should be accompanied by off-axis $\gamma$-ray burst jets that remain invisible initially, but then emerge as strong radio sources (as the jets decelerate). However, this critical prediction of the jet model for gamma-ray bursts has yet to be verified observationally. Here, we present K. G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of 15 broad-lined supernovae of Type Ic discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory in an untargeted manner. Most of the supernovae in our sample exclude radio emission observationally similar to that of the radio-loud, relativistic SN\,1998bw. We constrain the fraction of 1998bw-like broad-lined Type Ic supernovae to be <~ 41% (99.865% confidence). Most of the events in our sample also exclude off-axis jets similar to GRB 031203 and GRB 030329, but we cannot rule out off-axis gamma-ray-bursts expanding in a low-density wind environment. Three supernovae in our sample are detected in the radio. PTF11qcj and PTF14dby show late-time radio emission with average ejecta speeds of ~(0.3-0.4)c, on the dividing line between relativistic and "ordinary" supernovae. The speed of PTF11cmh radio ejecta is poorly constrained. We estimate that <~ 85% (99.865% confidence) of the broad-lined Type Ic supernovae in our sample may harbor off-axis $\gamma$-ray-bursts expanding in media with densities in the range probed by this study.
  • We present the results of optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared observations of M101 OT2015-1 (PSN J14021678+5426205), a luminous red transient in the Pinwheel galaxy (M101), spanning a total of 16 years. The lightcurve showed two distinct peaks with absolute magnitudes $M_r\leq-12.4$ and $M_r \simeq-12$, on 2014 November 11 and 2015 February 17, respectively. The spectral energy distributions during the second maximum show a cool outburst temperature of $\approx$3700 K and low expansion velocities ($\approx-$300 \kms) for the H I, Ca II, Ba II and K I lines. From archival data spanning 15 to 8 years before the outburst, we find a single source consistent with the optically discovered transient which we attribute to being the progenitor; it has properties consistent with being an F-type yellow supergiant with $L$~$\sim$~8.7~$\times\ 10^4$ \Lsun, $T_{\rm{eff}}\approx$7000~K and an estimated mass of $\rm{M1}= 18\pm 1$ \Msun. This star has likely just finished the H burning phase in the core, started expanding, and is now crossing the Hertzsprung gap. Based on the combination of observed properties, we argue that the progenitor is a binary system, with the more evolved system overfilling the Roche lobe. Comparison with binary evolution models suggests that the outburst was an extremely rare phenomenon, likely associated with the ejection of the common envelope. The initial mass of the binary progenitor system fills the gap between the merger candidates V838 Mon (5$-$10 \Msun) and NGC~4490-OT~(30~\Msun).
  • Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10^44 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-30 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6x10^-6 times that of the core-collapse rate.
  • Due to its proximity, SN 1987A offers a unique opportunity to directly observe the geometry of a stellar explosion as it unfolds. Here we present spectral and imaging observations of SN 1987A obtained ~10,000 days after the explosion with HST/STIS and VLT/SINFONI at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. These observations allow us to produce the most detailed 3D map of H-alpha to date, the first 3D maps for [Ca II] \lambda \lambda 7292, 7324, [O I] \lambda \lambda 6300, 6364 and Mg II \lambda \lambda 9218, 9244, as well as new maps for [Si I]+[Fe II] 1.644 \mu m and He I 2.058 \mu m. A comparison with previous observations shows that the [Si I]+[Fe II] flux and morphology have not changed significantly during the past ten years, providing evidence that it is powered by 44Ti. The time-evolution of H-alpha shows that it is predominantly powered by X-rays from the ring, in agreement with previous findings. All lines that have sufficient signal show a similar large-scale 3D structure, with a north-south asymmetry that resembles a broken dipole. This structure correlates with early observations of asymmetries, showing that there is a global asymmetry that extends from the inner core to the outer envelope. On smaller scales, the two brightest lines, H-alpha and [Si I]+[Fe II] 1.644 \mu m, show substructures at the level of ~ 200 - 1000 km/s and clear differences in their 3D geometries. We discuss these results in the context of explosion models and the properties of dust in the ejecta.
  • Context: Research on supernovae (SNe) over the past decade has confirmed that there is a distinct class of events which are much more luminous (by $\sim2$ mag) than canonical core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). These events with visual peak magnitudes $\lesssim-21$ are called superluminous SNe (SLSNe). Aims: There are a few intermediate events which have luminosities between these two classes. Here we study one such object, SN 2012aa. Methods: The optical photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the event were conducted over a time span of about 120 days. Results: With V_abs at peak ~-20 mag, the SN is an intermediate-luminosity transient between regular SNe Ibc and SLSNe. It also exhibits an unusual secondary bump after the maximum in its light curve. We interpret this as a manifestation of SN-shock interaction with the CSM. If we would assume a $^{56}$Ni-powered ejecta, the bolometric light curve requires roughly 1.3 M_sun of $^{56}$Ni and an ejected mass of ~14 M_sun. This would also imply a high kinetic energy of the explosion, ~5.4$\times10^{51}$ ergs. On the other hand, the unusually broad light curve along with the secondary peak indicate the possibility of interaction with CSM. The third alternative is the presence of a central engine releasing spin energy that eventually powers the light curve over a long time. The host of the SN is a star-forming Sa/Sb/Sbc galaxy. Conclusions: Although the spectral properties and velocity evolution of SN 2012aa are comparable to those of normal SNe Ibc, its broad light curve along with a large peak luminosity distinguish it from canonical CCSNe, suggesting the event to be an intermediate-luminosity transient between CCSNe and SLSNe at least in terms of peak luminosity. We argue that SN 2012aa belongs to a subclass where CSM interaction plays a significant role in powering the SN, at least during the initial stages of evolution.
  • We investigate two stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC 5806 by the (i)PTF. These SNe, designated PTF12os/SN 2012P and iPTF13bvn, exploded at a similar distance from the host-galaxy center. We classify PTF12os as a Type IIb SN based on our spectral sequence; iPTF13bvn has previously been classified as Type Ib having a likely progenitor with zero age main sequence (ZAMS) mass below ~17 solar masses. Our main objective is to constrain the explosion parameters of iPTF12os and iPTF13bvn, and to put constraints on the SN progenitors. We present comprehensive datasets on the SNe, and introduce a new reference-subtraction pipeline (FPipe) currently in use by the iPTF. We perform a detailed study of the light curves (LCs) and spectral evolution of the SNe. The bolometric LCs are modeled using the hydrodynamical code HYDE. We use nebular models and late-time spectra to constrain the ZAMS mass of the progenitors. We perform image registration of ground-based images of PTF12os to archival HST images of NGC 5806 to identify a potential progenitor candidate. Our nebular spectra of iPTF13bvn indicate a low ZAMS mass of ~12 solar masses for the progenitor. The late-time spectra of PTF12os are consistent with a ZAMS mass of ~15 solar masses. We successfully identify a progenitor candidate to PTF12os using archival HST images. This source is consistent with being a cluster of massive stars. Our hydrodynamical modeling suggests that the progenitor of PTF12os had a compact He core with a mass of 3.25 solar masses, and that 0.063 solar masses of strongly mixed 56Ni was synthesized. Spectral comparisons to the Type IIb SN 2011dh indicate that the progenitor of PTF12os was surrounded by a hydrogen envelope with a mass lower than 0.02 solar masses. We also find tentative evidence that the progenitor of iPTF13bvn could have been surrounded by a small amount of hydrogen.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013ej, in galaxy M74, from 1 to 450 days after the explosion. SN 2013ej is a hydrogen-rich supernova, classified as a Type IIL due to its relatively fast decline following the initial peak. It has a relatively high peak luminosity (absolute magnitude M$_\rm{V}$ = -17.6) but a small $^{56}$Ni production of ~0.023 M$_\odot$. Its photospheric evolution is similar to other Type II SNe, with shallow absorption in the H{\alpha} profile typical for a Type IIL. During transition to the radioactive decay tail at ~100 days, we find the SN to grow bluer in B - V colour, in contrast to some other Type II supernovae. At late times, the bolometric light curve declined faster than expected from $^{56}$Co decay and we observed unusually broad and asymmetric nebular emission lines. Based on comparison of nebular emission lines most sensitive to the progenitor core mass, we find our observations are best matched to synthesized spectral models with a M$_\rm{ZAMS}$ = 12 - 15 M$_\odot$ progenitor. The derived mass range is similar to but not higher than the mass estimated for Type IIP progenitors. This is against the idea that Type IIL are from more massive stars. Observations are consistent with the SN having a progenitor with a relatively low-mass envelope.