• The manifestation of Weyl fermions in strongly correlated electron systems is of particular interest. We report evidence for Weyl fermions in the heavy fermion semimetal YbPtBi from electronic structure calculations, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, magnetotransport and calorimetric measurements. At elevated temperatures where $4f$-electrons are localized, there are triply degenerate points, yielding Weyl nodes in applied magnetic fields. These are revealed by a contribution from the chiral anomaly in the magnetotransport, which at low temperatures becomes negligible due to the influence of electronic correlations. Instead, Weyl fermions are inferred from the topological Hall effect, which provides evidence for a Berry curvature, and a cubic temperature dependence of the specific heat, as expected from the linear dispersion near the Weyl nodes. The results suggest that YbPtBi is a Weyl heavy fermion semimetal, where the Kondo interaction renormalizes the bands hosting Weyl points. These findings open up an opportunity to explore the interplay between topology and strong electronic correlations.
  • Superconductivity was recently observed in CrAs as the helimagnetic order is suppressed by applying pressure, suggesting possible unconventional superconductivity. To reveal the nature of the superconducting order parameter of CrAs, here we report the angular dependence of the upper critical field under pressure. Upon rotating the field by 360 degrees in the $bc$-plane, six maxima are observed in the upper critical field, where the oscillations have both six-fold and two-fold symmetric components. Our analysis suggests the presence of an unconventional odd-parity spin triplet state.
  • The balloon-borne HiCal radio-frequency (RF) transmitter, in concert with the ANITA radio-frequency receiver array, is designed to measure the Antarctic surface reflectivity in the RF wavelength regime. The amplitude of surface-reflected transmissions from HiCal, registered as triggered events by ANITA, can be compared with the direct transmissions preceding them by O(10) microseconds, to infer the surface power reflection coefficient $\cal{R}$. The first HiCal mission (HiCal-1, Jan. 2015) yielded a sample of 100 such pairs, resulting in estimates of $\cal{R}$ at highly-glancing angles (i.e., zenith angles approaching $90^\circ$), with measured reflectivity for those events which exceeded extant calculations. The HiCal-2 experiment, flying from Dec., 2016-Jan., 2017, provided an improvement by nearly two orders of magnitude in our event statistics, allowing a considerably more precise mapping of the reflectivity over a wider range of incidence angles. We find general agreement between the HiCal-2 reflectivity results and those obtained with the earlier HiCal-1 mission, as well as estimates from Solar reflections in the radio-frequency regime. In parallel, our calculations of expected reflectivity have matured; herein, we use a plane-wave expansion to estimate the reflectivity R from both a flat, smooth surface (and, in so doing, recover the Fresnel reflectivity equations) and also a curved surface. Multiplying our flat-smooth reflectivity by improved Earth curvature and surface roughness corrections now provides significantly better agreement between theory and the HiCal 2a/2b measurements.
  • Materials where the electronic bands have unusual topologies allow for the realization of novel physics and have a wide range of potential applications. When two electronic bands with linear dispersions intersect at a point, the excitations could be described as Weyl fermions which are massless particles with a particular chirality. Here we report evidence for the presence of Weyl fermions in the ferromagnetic state of the low-carrier density, strongly correlated Kondo lattice system CeSb, from electronic structure calculations and angle-dependent magnetoresistance measurements. When the applied magnetic field is parallel to the electric current, a pronounced negative magnetoresistance is observed within the ferromagnetic state, which is destroyed upon slightly rotating the field away. These results give evidence for CeSb belonging to a new class of Kondo lattice materials with Weyl fermions in the ferromagnetic state.
  • We report magnetotransport measurements of PrSb in high magnetic fields. Our results show that PrSb exhibits extremely large magnetoresistance(XMR) at low temperatures. Meanwhile angle-dependent magnetoresistance measurements were used to probe the Fermi surface via Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations. The angular dependence of the frequencies of the $\alpha$-branch indicate a two-dimensional character for this Fermi surface sheet, while the effective mass of this branch as a function of angle shows a four-fold signature. The evolution of the Fermi surface with field was also studied up to 32~T. An enlargement of the Fermi surface up to 14~T is observed, before the oscillation frequencies become constant at higher fields. Meanwhile our analysis of the residual Landau index from the high field data reveals a zero Berry phase and therefore trivial topology of the Fermi surface.
  • The primary science goal of the NASA-sponsored ANITA project is measurement of ultra-high energy neutrinos and cosmic rays, observed via radio-frequency signals resulting from a neutrino- or cosmic ray- interaction with terrestrial matter (atmospheric or ice molecules, e.g.). Accurate inference of the energies of these cosmic rays requires understanding the transmission/reflection of radio wave signals across the ice-air boundary. Satellite-based measurements of Antarctic surface reflectivity, using a co-located transmitter and receiver, have been performed more-or-less continuously for the last few decades. Satellite-based reflectivity surveys, at frequencies ranging from 2--45 GHz and at near-normal incidence, yield generally consistent reflectivity maps across Antarctica. Using the Sun as an RF source, and the ANITA-3 balloon borne radio-frequency antenna array as the RF receiver, we have also measured the surface reflectivity over the interval 200-1000 MHz, at elevation angles of 12-30 degrees, finding agreement with the Fresnel equations within systematic errors. To probe low incidence angles, inaccessible to the Antarctic Solar technique and not probed by previous satellite surveys, a novel experimental approach ("HiCal-1") was devised. Unlike previous measurements, HiCal-ANITA constitute a bi-static transmitter-receiver pair separated by hundreds of kilometers. Data taken with HiCal, between 200--600 MHz shows a significant departure from the Fresnel equations, constant with frequency over that band, with the deficit increasing with obliquity of incidence, which we attribute to the combined effects of possible surface roughness, surface grain effects, radar clutter and/or shadowing of the reflection zone due to Earth curvature effects.
  • Incentive mechanisms for crowdsourcing have been extensively studied under the framework of all-pay auctions. Along a distinct line, this paper proposes to use Tullock contests as an alternative tool to design incentive mechanisms for crowdsourcing. We are inspired by the conduciveness of Tullock contests to attracting user entry (yet not necessarily a higher revenue) in other domains. In this paper, we explore a new dimension in optimal Tullock contest design, by superseding the contest prize---which is fixed in conventional Tullock contests---with a prize function that is dependent on the (unknown) winner's contribution, in order to maximize the crowdsourcer's utility. We show that this approach leads to attractive practical advantages: (a) it is well-suited for rapid prototyping in fully distributed web agents and smartphone apps; (b) it overcomes the disincentive to participate caused by players' antagonism to an increasing number of rivals. Furthermore, we optimize conventional, fixed-prize Tullock contests to construct the most superior benchmark to compare against our mechanism. Through extensive evaluations, we show that our mechanism significantly outperforms the optimal benchmark, by over three folds on the crowdsourcer's utility cum profit and up to nine folds on the players' social welfare.
  • The first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment recorded 16 radio signals that were emitted by cosmic-ray induced air showers. For 14 of these events, this radiation was reflected from the ice. The dominant contribution to the radiation from the deflection of positrons and electrons in the geomagnetic field, which is beamed in the direction of motion of the air shower. This radiation is reflected from the ice and subsequently detected by the ANITA experiment at a flight altitude of 36km. In this paper, we estimate the energy of the 14 individual events and find that the mean energy of the cosmic-ray sample is 2.9 EeV. By simulating the ANITA flight, we calculate its exposure for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We estimate for the first time the cosmic-ray flux derived only from radio observations. In addition, we find that the Monte Carlo simulation of the ANITA data set is in agreement with the total number of observed events and with the properties of those events.
  • We have studied electronic conductivity and shot noise of bilayer graphene (BLG) sheets at high bias voltages and low bath temperature $T_0=4.2$ K. As a function of bias, we find initially an increase of the differential conductivity, which we attribute to self-heating. At higher bias, the conductivity saturates and even decreases due to backscattering from optical phonons. The electron-phonon interactions are also responsible for the decay of the Fano factor at bias voltages $V>0.1$ V. The high bias electronic temperature has been calculated from shot noise measurements, and it goes up to $\sim1200$ K at $V=0.75$ V. Using the theoretical temperature dependence of BLG conductivity, we extract an effective electron-optical phonon scattering time $\tau_{e-op}$. In a 230 nm long BLG sample of mobility $\mu=3600$ cm$^2$V$^{-1}$s$^{-1}$, we find that $\tau_{e-op}$ decreases with increasing voltage and is close to the charged impurity scattering time $\tau_{imp}=60$ fs at $V=0.6$ V.
  • We have investigated shot noise and conduction of graphene field effect nanoribbon devices at low temperature. By analyzing the exponential $I-V$ characteristics of our devices in the transport gap region, we found out that transport follows variable range hopping laws at intermediate bias voltages $1 < V_{bias} < 12$ mV. In parallel, we observe a strong shot noise suppression leading to very low Fano factors. The strong suppression of shot noise is consistent with inelastic hopping, in crossover from one- to two-dimensional regime, indicating that the localization length $l_{loc} < W$ in our nanoribbons.
  • We report the observation of sixteen cosmic ray events of mean energy of 1.5 x 10^{19} eV, via radio pulses originating from the interaction of the cosmic ray air shower with the Antarctic geomagnetic field, a process known as geosynchrotron emission. We present the first ultra-wideband, far-field measurements of the radio spectral density of geosynchrotron emission in the range from 300-1000 MHz. The emission is 100% linearly polarized in the plane perpendicular to the projected geomagnetic field. Fourteen of our observed events are seen to have a phase-inversion due to reflection of the radio beam off the ice surface, and two additional events are seen directly from above the horizon.
  • We have investigated proximity-induced supercurrents in single-walled carbon nanotubes in the Kondo regime and compared them with supercurrents obtained on the same tube with Fabry-P\'{e}rot resonances. Our data display a wide distribution of Kondo temperatures \emph{$T_K$} = 1 - 14 K, and the measured critical current $I_{CM}$ vs. \emph{$T_K$} displays two distinct branches; these branches, distinguished by zero-bias splitting of the normal-state Kondo conductance peak, differ by an order of magnitude at large values of $T_K$. Evidence for renormalization of Andreev levels in Kondo regime is also found.
  • We have investigated electrical transport and shot noise in graphene field effect devices. In large width over length ratio $W/L$ graphene strips, we have measured shot noise at low frequency ($f$ = 600--850 MHz) in the temperature range of 4.2--30 K. We observe a minimum conductivity of $\frac{4e^{2}}{\pi h}$ and a finite and gate dependent Fano factor reaching the universal value of 1/3 at the Dirac point, i.e. where the density of states vanishes. These findings are in good agreement with the theory describing that transport at the Dirac point should occur via evanescent waves in perfect graphene samples with large $W/L$. Moreover, we show and discuss how disorder and non-parallel leads affect both conductivity and shot noise.
  • We have investigated shot noise in graphene field effect devices in the temperature range of 4.2--30 K at low frequency ($f$ = 600--850 MHz). We find that for our graphene samples with large width over length ratio $W/L$, the Fano factor $\mathfrak{F}$ reaches a maximum $\mathfrak{F} \sim$ 1/3 at the Dirac point and that it decreases strongly with increasing charge density. For smaller $W/L$, the Fano factor at Dirac point is significantly lower. Our results are in good agreement with the theory describing that transport at the Dirac point in clean graphene arises from evanescent electronic states.
  • We have investigated radio-frequency single-electron transistor (RF-SET) operation of single-walled carbon nanotube quantum dots in the strong tunneling regime. At 4.2 K and carrier frequency 754.2 MHz, we reach a charge sensitivity of 2.3e-6 e/Hz^(1/2) over a bandwidth of 85 MHz. Our results indicate a gain-bandwidth product of 3.7e13 Hz^(3/2)/e, which is by one order of magnitude better than for typical RF-SETs.
  • We have investigated shot noise in multiterminal, diffusive multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) at 4.2 K over the frequency f = 600 - 850 MHz. Quantitative comparison of our data to semiclassical theory, based on non-equilibrium distribution functions, indicates that a major part of the noise is caused by a non-equilibrium state imposed by the contacts. Our data exhibits non-local shot noise across weakly transmitting contacts while a low-impedance contact eliminates such noise almost fully. We obtain F_{tube}< 0.03 for the intrinsic Fano factor of our MWNTs.
  • We have measured shot noise in single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with good contacts at 4.2 K at low frequencies ($f=600 - 850$ MHz). We find a strong modulation of shot noise over the Fabry-Perot pattern; in terms of differential Fano factor the variation ranges over 0.4 - 1.2. The shot noise variation, in combination with differential conductance, is analyzed using two (spin-degenerate) modes with different, energy-dependent transmission coefficients. No power law dependence of shot noise, as expected for Luttinger liquids, was found in our measurements.
  • We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.
  • We have investigated shot noise in a 6-nm-diameter, semiconducting multiwalled carbon nanotube FET at 4.2 K over the frequency range 600 - 950 MHz. We find a transconductance of 3 - 3.5 $\mu$S for optimal positive and negative source-drain voltages V. For the gate referred input voltage noise, we obtain 0.2 and 0.3 $\mu{V}/ \sqrt{Hz}$ for V>0 and V<0, respectively. As effective charge noise this corresponds to $2-3 \cdot 10^{-5}$ e/$\sqrt{Hz}$.
  • We report new limits on cosmic neutrino fluxes from the test flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, which completed an 18.4 day flight of a prototype long-duration balloon payload, called ANITA-lite, in early 2004. We search for impulsive events that could be associated with ultra-high energy neutrino interactions in the ice, and derive limits that constrain several models for ultra-high energy neutrino fluxes. We rule out the long-standing Z-burst model as the source for the ultra-high energy cosmic rays.
  • We describe a new experiment to search for neutrinos with energies above 3 x 10^18 eV based on the observation of short duration radio pulses that are emitted from neutrino-initiated cascades. The primary objective of the ANtarctic Impulse Transient Antenna (ANITA) mission is to measure the flux of Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) neutrinos and search for neutrinos from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We present first results obtained from the successful launch of a 2-antenna prototype instrument (called ANITA-lite) that circled Antarctica for 18 days during the 03/04 Antarctic campaign and show preliminary results from attenuation length studies of electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies in Antarctic ice. The ANITA detector is funded by NASA, and the first flight is scheduled for December 2006.
  • Using the method proposed in a previous paper, we calculate pulsar braking indices in the models with torque contributions from both inner and outer accelerating regions, assuming that the interaction between them is negligible. We suggest that it is likely that the inverse Compton scattering induced polar vacuum gap and the outer gap coexist in the pulsar magnetosphere. We include the new near threshold vacuum gap models with curvature-radiation and inverse Compton scattering induced cascades, respectively; and find that these models can well reproduce the measured values of the braking indices.