• We use a suite of simulated images based on Year 1 of the Dark Energy Survey to explore the impact of galaxy neighbours on shape measurement and shear cosmology. The hoopoe image simulations include realistic blending, galaxy positions, and spatial variations in depth and PSF properties. Using the im3shape maximum-likelihood shape measurement code, we identify four mechanisms by which neighbours can have a non-negligible influence on shear estimation. These effects, if ignored, would contribute a net multiplicative bias of $m \sim 0.03 - 0.09$ in the DES Y1 im3shape catalogue, though the precise impact will be dependent on both the measurement code and the selection cuts applied. This can be reduced to percentage level or less by removing objects with close neighbours, at a cost to the effective number density of galaxies $n_\mathrm{eff}$ of 30%. We use the cosmological inference pipeline of DES Y1 to explore the cosmological implications of neighbour bias and show that omitting blending from the calibration simulation for DES Y1 would bias the inferred clustering amplitude $S_8\equiv \sigma_8 (\Omega _\mathrm{m} /0.3)^{0.5}$ by $2 \sigma$ towards low values. Finally, we use the hoopoe simulations to test the effect of neighbour-induced spatial correlations in the multiplicative bias. We find the impact on the recovered $S_8$ of ignoring such correlations to be subdominant to statistical error at the current level of precision.
  • We present a new selection technique of producing spectroscopic target catalogues for massive spectroscopic surveys for cosmology. This work was conducted in the context of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), which will use ~200 000 emission line galaxies (ELGs) at 0.6<zspec<1.0 to obtain a precise baryon acoustic oscillation measurement. Our proposed selection technique is based on optical and near-infrared broad-band filter photometry. We used a training sample to define a quantity, the Fisher discriminant (linear combination of colours), which correlates best with the desired properties of the target: redshift and [OII] flux. The proposed selections are simply done by applying a cut on magnitudes and this Fisher discriminant. We used public data and dedicated SDSS spectroscopy to quantify the redshift distribution and [OII] flux of our ELG target selections. We demonstrate that two of our selections fulfil the initial eBOSS/ELG redshift requirements: for a target density of 180 deg^2, ~70% of the selected objects have 0.6<zspec<1.0 and only ~1% of those galaxies in the range 0.6<zspec<1.0 are expected to have a catastrophic zspec estimate. Additionally, the stacked spectra and stacked deep images for those two selections show characteristic features of star-forming galaxies. The proposed approach using the Fisher discriminant could, however, be used to efficiently select other galaxy populations, based on multi-band photometry, providing that spectroscopic information is available. This technique could thus be useful for other future massive spectroscopic surveys such as PFS, DESI, and 4MOST.
  • We model a 21 cm intensity mapping survey in the redshift range 0.01<z<1.5 designed to simulate the skies as seen by future radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), including instrumental noise and Galactic foregrounds. In our pipeline, we remove the introduced Galactic foregrounds with a fast independent component analysis (fastica) technique. We present the power spectrum of the large-scale matter distribution, C(l), before and after the application of this foreground removal method and calculate the resulting systematic errors. We attempt to reduce systematics in the foreground subtraction by optimally masking the maps to remove high foregrounds in the Galactic plane. Our simulations show a certain level of bias remains in the power spectrum at all scales l<400. At large-scales l<30 this bias is particularly significant. We measure the impact of these systematic effects in two different ways: firstly we fit cosmological parameters to the broadband shape of the power spectrum and secondly we extract the position of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). In the first analysis, we find that the systematics introduce an significant shift in the best fit cosmological parameters at the 2 to 3 sigma level which depends on the masking and noise levels. However, cosmic distances can be recovered in an unbiased way after foreground removal at all simulated redshifts by fitting the BAOs in the power spectrum. We conclude that further advances in foreground removal are needed in order to recover unbiased information from the broadband shape of the power spectrum, however, intensity mapping experiments will be a powerful tool for mapping cosmic distances across a wide redshift range.
  • We present a catalogue of galaxy groups and clusters selected using a friends-of-friends algorithm with a dynamic linking length from the 2dF-SDSS and QSO (2SLAQ) luminous red galaxy survey. The linking parameters for the code are chosen through an analysis of simulated 2SLAQ haloes. The resulting catalogue includes 313 clusters containing 1,152 galaxies. The galaxy groups and clusters have an average velocity dispersion of sigma_v = 467.97 km/s and an average size of R_clt = 0.78 Mpc/h. Galaxies from regions of one square degree and centred on the galaxy clusters were downloaded from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6). Investigating the photometric redshifts and cluster red-sequence of these galaxies shows that the galaxy clusters detected with the FoF algorithm are reliable out to z~0.6. We estimate masses for the clusters using their velocity dispersions. These mass estimates are shown to be consistent with 2SLAQ mock halo masses. Further analysis of the simulation haloes shows that clipping out low richness groups with large radii improves the purity of catalogue from 52% to 88%, while retaining a completeness of 94%. Finally, we test the two-point correlation function of our cluster catalogue. We find a best-fitting power law model with parameters r0 = 24\pm4 Mpc/h and gamma = -2.1\pm 0.2, which are in agreement with other low redshift cluster samples and consistent with a {\Lambda}CDM universe.
  • The present-day Universe is seemingly dominated by dark energy and dark matter, but mapping the normal (baryonic) content remains vital for both astrophysics - understanding how galaxies form - and astro-particle physics - inferring properties of the dark components. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will provide the only means of studying the cosmic evolution of neutral Hydrogen (HI) which, alongside information on star formation from the radio continuum, is needed to understand how stars formed from gas within dark-matter over-densities and the roles of gas accretion and galaxy merging. `All hemisphere' HI redshift surveys to redshift 1.5 are feasible with wide-field-of-view realizations of the SKA and, by measuring the galaxy power spectrum in exquisite detail, will allow the first precise studies of the equation-of-state of dark energy. The SKA will be capable of other uniquely powerful cosmological studies including the measurement of the dark-matter power spectrum using weak gravitational lensing, and the precise measurement of H0 using extragalactic water masers. The SKA is likely to become the premier dark-energy-measuring machine, bringing breakthroughs in cosmology beyond those likely to be made possible by combining CMB (e.g. Planck), optical (e.g. LSST, SNAP) and other early-21st-century datasets.