• We develop a formalism relating nonlocal current continuity to spatial symmetries of subparts in discrete Schr\"odinger systems. Breaking of such local symmetries hereby generates sources or sinks for the associated nonlocal currents. The framework is applied to locally inversion-(time-) and translation-(time-) symmetric one-dimensional photonic waveguide arrays with Hermitian or non-Hermitian effective tight-binding Hamiltonians. For stationary states the nonlocal currents become translationally invariant within symmetric domains, exposing different types of local symmetry. They are further employed to derive a mapping between wave amplitudes of symmetry-related sites, generalizing also the global Bloch and parity mapping to local symmetry in discrete systems. In scattering setups, perfectly transmitting states are characterized by aligned invariant currents in attached symmetry domains, whose vanishing signifies a correspondingly symmetric density. For periodically driven arrays, the invariance of the nonlocal currents is retained on period average for quasi-energy eigenstates. The proposed theory of symmetry-induced continuity and local invariants may contribute to the understanding of wave structure and response in systems with localized spatial order.
  • In the dynamics of the QCD critical point, the net-baryon fluid, linked to the slow component of the order parameter, relaxes to a 3d Ising system in equilibrium. An analytical study of shear and bulk viscosity, with constraints imposed by the dynamics of the critical net-baryon fluid, the universality property and the requirements of a class of strong coupling theories, is performed in the neighbourhood of the critical point. It is found that the shear viscosity of the net-baryon fluid is restricted in the domain $1.6\leq 4\pi\frac{\eta}{s}\leq 3.7$ for $T_c < T \leq 2T_c$ whereas the bulk viscosity is small, $4\pi\frac{\zeta}{s} < 0.05$ (for $T>1.27 T_c$) but rising towards the singularity at $T=T_c$.
  • We propose a quasi-particle model for the thermodynamic description of the gluon plasma which takes into account non-abelian characteristics of the gluonic field. This is accomplished utilizing massive non-linear plane wave solutions of the classical equations of motion with a variable mass parameter, reflecting the scale invariance of the Yang-Mills Lagrangian. For the statistical description of the gluon plasma we interpret these non-linear waves as quasi-particles with a temperature dependent mass distribution. Quasi-Gaussian distributions with a common variance but different temperature dependent mean masses for the longitudinal and transverse modes are employed. We use recent Lattice results to fix the mean transverse and longitudinal masses while the variance is fitted to the equation of state of pure $SU(3)$ on the Lattice. Thus, our model succeeds to obtain both a consistent description of the gluon plasma energy density as well as a correct behaviour of the mass parameters near the critical point.
  • The experimental search for the location of the QCD critical point in the phase diagram is of primary importance. In a recent publication it is claimed that measurements at RHIC lead not only to the location of the critical point ($\mu_{cep}=95$ MeV, $T_{cep}=165$ MeV) but also to the verification of its universality class ($3d$ Ising system) by extracting the values of the critical exponents ($\gamma=1.2$, $\nu=0.66$). We argue that this claim is based on an erroneous treatment of scaling relations near the critical point. As a result, the correct interpretation of the measurements cannot be linked to the QCD critical point.
  • We implement the concept of complete local symmetry in lossy acoustic waveguides. Despite the presence of losses, the existence of a spatially invariant current is shown theoretically and observed experimentally. We demonstrate how this invariant current leads to the generalization of the Bloch and parity theorems for lossy systems defining a mapping of the pressure field between symmetry related spatial domains. Using experimental data we verify this mapping with remarkable accuracy. For the performed experiment we employ a construction technique based on local symmetries which allows the design of setups with prescribed perfect transmission resonances in the lossless case. Our results reveal the fundamental role of symmetries in restricted spatial domains and clearly indicate that completely locally symmetric devices constitute a promising class of setups, regarding the manipulation of wave propagation.
  • Recently [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf 106}, 093902 (2011)] it has been shown that $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric scattering systems with balanced gain and loss, undergo a transition from $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric scattering eigenstates, which are norm preserving, to symmetry broken pairs of eigenstates exhibiting net amplification and loss. In the present work we derive the existence of an invariant non-local current which can be directly associated with the observed transition playing the role of an "order parameter". The use of this current for the description of the $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry breaking allows the extension of the known phase diagram to higher dimensions incorporating scattering states which are not eigenstates of the scattering matrix.
  • We study the classical dynamics of the Abelian Higgs model employing an asymptotic multiscale expansion method, which uses the ratio of the Higgs to the gauge field amplitudes as a small parameter. We derive an effective nonlinear Schr\"{o}dinger equation for the gauge field, and a linear equation for the scalar field containing the gauge field as a nonlinear source. This equation is used to predict the existence of oscillons and oscillating kinks for certain regimes of the ratio of the Higgs to the gauge field masses. Results of numerical simulations are found to be in very good agreement with the analytical findings, and show that the oscillons are robust, while kinks are unstable. It is also demonstrated that oscillons emerge spontaneously as a result of the onset of the modulational instability of plane wave solutions of the model. Connections of the obtained solutions with the phenomenology of superconductors is discussed.
  • We study the classical dynamics of the Abelian-Higgs model in (1+1) space-time dimensions bf for the case of strongly broken gauge symmetry. In this limit the wells of the potential are almost harmonic and sufficiently deep, presenting a scenario far from the associated critical point. Using a multiscale perturbation expansion, the equations of motion for the fields are reduced to a system of coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equations (CNLS). Exact solutions of the latter are used to obtain approximate analytical solutions for the full dynamics of both the gauge and Higgs field in the form of oscillons and oscillating kinks. Numerical simulations of the exact dynamics verify the validity of these solutions. We explore their persistence for a wide range of the model's single parameter which is the ratio of the Higgs mass to the gauge field mass . We show that only oscillons oscillating symmetrically with respect to the "classical vacuum", for both the gauge and the Higgs field, are long lived. Furthermore plane waves and oscillating kinks are shown to decay into oscillon- like patterns, due to the modulation instability mechanism.
  • The parity and Bloch theorems are generalized to the case of broken global symmetry. Local inversion or translation symmetries are shown to yield invariant currents that characterize wave propagation. These currents map the wave function from an arbitrary spatial domain to any symmetry-related domain. Our approach addresses any combination of local symmetries, thus applying in particular to acoustic, optical and matter waves. Nonvanishing values of the invariant currents provide a systematic pathway to the breaking of discrete global symmetries.
  • We develop a classification of perfectly transmitting resonances occuring in effectively one-dimensional optical media which are decomposable into locally reflection symmetric parts. The local symmetries of the medium are shown to yield piecewise translation-invariant quantities, which are used to distinguish resonances with arbitrary field profile from resonances following the medium symmetries. Focusing on light scattering in aperiodic multilayer structures, we demonstrate this classification for representative setups, providing insight into the origin of perfect transmission. We further show how local symmetries can be utilized for the design of optical devices with perfect transmission at prescribed energies. Providing a link between resonant scattering and local symmetries of the underlying medium, the proposed approach may contribute to the understanding of optical response in complex systems.
  • In the present work, we consider the problem of a system of few vortices $N \leq 5$ as it emerges from its experimental realization in the field of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. Starting from the corresponding equations of motion, we use a two-pronged approach in order to reveal the configuration space of the system's preferred dynamical states. On the one hand, we use a Monte-Carlo method parametrizing the vortex "particles" by means of hyperspherical coordinates and identifying the minimal energy ground states thereof for $N=2, ..., 5$ and different vortex particle angular momenta. We then complement this picture with a dynamical systems analysis of the possible rigidly rotating states. The latter reveals all the supercritical and subcritical pitchfork, as well as saddle-center bifurcations that arise exposing the full wealth of the problem even at such low dimensional cases. By corroborating the results of the two methods, it becomes fairly transparent which branch the Monte-Carlo approach selects for different values of the angular momentum which is used as a bifurcation parameter.
  • We study the classical dynamics of the Abelian Higgs model employing an asymptotic multiscale expansion method, which uses the ratio of the Higgs to the gauge field amplitudes as a small parameter. We derive an effective nonlinear Schrodinger equation for the gauge field, and a linear equation for the scalar field containing the gauge field as a nonlinear source. This equation is used to predict the existence of oscillons and oscillating kinks for certain regimes of the ratio of the Higgs to the gauge field masses. Results of direct numerical simulations are found to be in very good agreement with the analytical findings, and show that the oscillons are robust, while kinks are unstable. It is also demonstrated that oscillons emerge spontaneously as a result of the onset of the modulational instability of plane wave solutions of the model. Connections of the results with the phenomenology of superconductors is discussed.
  • We investigate the classical dynamics of the massive SU(2) Yang-Mills field in the framework of multiple scale perturbation theory. We show analytically that there exists a subset of solutions having the form of a kink soliton, modulated by a plane wave, in a linear subspace transverse to the direction of free propagation. Subsequently, we explore how these solutions affect the dynamics of a Dirac field possessing an SU(2) charge. We find that this class of Yang-Mills configurations, when regarded as an external field, leads to the localization of the fermion along a line in the transverse space. Our analysis reveals a mechanism for trapping SU(2) charged fermions in the presence of an external Yang-Mills field indicating the non-abelian analogue of Landau localization in electrodynamics.
  • We study the classical dynamics of SU(2)-Higgs field theory using multiple scale perturbation theory. In the spontaneously broken phase, assuming small perturbations of the Higgs field around its vacuum expectation value, we derive a nonlinear Schroedinger equation and study the stability of its nonlinear plane wave solutions. The latter, turn out to be stable only if the Higgs amplitude is an order of magnitude smaller than that of the gauge field. In this case, the Higgs field mass possesses some bounds which may be relevant to the search for the Higgs particle at ongoing experiments.
  • We analyze the quantum dynamics of the time-dependent elliptical billiard using the example of a certain breathing mode. A numerical method for the time-propagation of an arbitrary initial state is developed, based on a series of transformations thereby removing the time-dependence of the boundary conditions. The time-evolution of the energies of different initial states is studied. The maximal and minimal energy that is reached during the time-evolution shows a series of resonances as a function of the applied driving frequency. At these resonances, higher (or lower) lying states are periodically populated, leading to the observed change in energy. The resonances occur when the driving frequency or a multiple of it matches exactly the mean energetic difference between the two involved states. This picture is confirmed by a few-level Rabi-like model with periodic couplings, reproducing the key results of our numerical study.
  • The description of Fermi acceleration developing in the phase-randomized simplified Fermi-Ulam model (SFUM) can be achieved in terms of a random walk taking place in momentum space. Within this framework the evolution of the probability density function of particle velocities is determined by the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE). However, the standard treatment in the literature leads to a result, which even though is in agreement with the numerical results, it is inconsistent with the transport coefficients used for the construction of the FPE. In this work we present a consistent scheme for the description of Fermi acceleration, resolving this contradiction.
  • Pion production in nuclear collisions at the SPS is investigated with the aim to search, in a restricted domain of the phase diagram, for power-laws in the behavior of correlations which are compatible with critical QCD. We have analyzed interactions of nuclei of different size (p+p, C+C, Si+Si, Pb+Pb) at 158$A$ GeV adopting, as appropriate observables, scaled factorial moments in a search for intermittent fluctuations in transverse dimensions. The analysis is performed for $\pi^+\pi^-$ pairs with invariant mass very close to the two-pion threshold. In this sector one may capture critical fluctuations of the sigma component in a hadronic medium, even if the $\sigma$-meson has no well defined vacuum state. It turns out that for the Pb+Pb system the proposed analysis technique cannot be applied without entering the invariant mass region with strong Coulomb correlations. As a result the treatment becomes inconclusive in this case. Our results for the other systems indicate the presence of power-law fluctuations in the freeze-out state of Si+Si approaching in size the prediction of critical QCD.
  • We investigate classical scattering off a harmonically oscillating target in two spatial dimensions. The shape of the scatterer is assumed to have a boundary which is locally convex at any point and does not support the presence of any periodic orbits in the corresponding dynamics. As a simple example we consider the scattering of a beam of non-interacting particles off a circular hard scatterer. The performed analysis is focused on experimentally accessible quantities, characterizing the system, like the differential cross sections in the outgoing angle and velocity. Despite the absence of periodic orbits and their manifolds in the dynamics, we show that the cross sections acquire rich and multiple structure when the velocity of the particles in the beam becomes of the same order of magnitude as the maximum velocity of the oscillating target. The underlying dynamical pattern is uniquely determined by the phase of the first collision between the beam particles and the scatterer and possesses a universal profile, dictated by the manifolds of the parabolic orbits, which can be understood both qualitatively as well as quantitatively in terms of scattering off a hard wall. We discuss also the inverse problem concerning the possibility to extract properties of the oscillating target from the differential cross sections.
  • The decay of the Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) in nuclei is studied by means of a nonlinear classical model consisting of several noninteracting nucleons (particles) moving in a potential well with an oscillating nuclear surface (wall). The motion of the nuclear surface is described by means of a collective variable which appears explicitly in the Hamiltonian as an additional degree of freedom. The total energy of the system is therefore conserved. Although the particles do not directly interact with each other, their motions are indirectly coupled by means of their interaction with the moving nuclear surface. We consider as free parameters in this model the degree of collectivity and the fraction of nucleons that participate to the decay of the collective excitation. Specifically, we have calculated the decay width of the ISGMR in the spherical nuclei $^{208}\rm{Pb}$, $^{144}\rm{Sm}$, $^{116}\rm{Sn}$ and $^{90}\rm{Zr}$. Despite its simplicity and its purely classical nature, the model reproduces the trend of the experimental data which show that with increasing mass number the decay width decreases. Moreover the experimental results (with the exception of $^{90}\rm{Zr}$) can be well fitted using appropriate values for the free parameters mentioned above. It is also found that these values allow for a good description of the experimentally measured $^{112}\rm{Sn}$ and $^{124}\rm{Sn}$ decay widths. In addition, we give a prediction for the decay width of the exotic isotope $^{132}Sn$ for which there is experimental interest. The agreement of our results with the corresponding experimental data for medium-heavy nuclei is dictated by the underlying classical mechanics i.e. the behaviour of the maximum Lyapunov exponent as a function of the system size.
  • We perform a comparative study of the quantum and classical transport probabilities of low-energy quasiparticles ballistically traversing normal and Andreev two-dimensional open cavities with a Sinai-billiard shape. We focus on the dependence of the transport on the strength of an applied magnetic field $B$. With increasing field strength the classical dynamics changes from mixed to regular phase space. Averaging out the quantum fluctuations, we find an excellent agreement between the quantum and classical transport coefficients in the complete range of field strengths. This allows an overall description of the non-monotonic behavior of the average magnetoconductance in terms of the corresponding classical trajectories, thus, establishing a basic tool useful in the design and analysis of experiments.
  • We derive a nonperturbative transverse momentum distribution for partons using a potential model to describe the quark-quark interaction inside the proton. We use this distribution to calculate the diferential cross-section of $\pi^0$-production for intermediate values of transverse momentum in $p-p$ collisions at high energies. Assuming a variable string tension constant for the quark-quark potential we obtain a very good description of the experimental data at different energies. The corresponding values of the mean transverse momentum of the partons are essentially lower than those obtained using a Gaussian transverse momentum parton distribution.
  • A detailed study of correlated scalars, produced in collisions of nuclei and associated with the $\sigma$-field fluctuations, $(\delta \sigma)^2= < \sigma^2 >$, at the QCD critical point (critical fluctuations), is performed on the basis of a critical event generator (Critical Monte-Carlo) developed in our previous work. The aim of this analysis is to reveal suitable observables of critical QCD in the multiparticle environment of simulated events and select appropriate signatures of the critical point, associated with new and strong effects in nuclear collisions.
  • A tool for the identification of the shape of quantum dots is developed. By preparing a two-electron quantum dot, the response of the low-lying excited states to a homogeneous magnetic field, i.e. their spin and parity oscillations, is studied for a large variety of dot shapes. For any geometric configuration of the confinement we encounter characteristic spin singlet - triplet crossovers. The magnetization is shown to be a complementary tool for probing the shape of the dot.
  • Within the context of the linear $\s$-model for two flavours, we investigate non-equilibrium phenomena that may occur during the QCD chiral phase transition in heavy-ion collisions. We assume that the chiral symmetry breaking is followed by a rapid quench so that the system falls out of thermal equilibrium. We study the mechanism for the amplification of the pion field during the oscillations of the $\s$-field towards and around its new minimum. We show that the pion spectrum develops a characteristic pronounced peak at low momenta.
  • A detailed study of correlated scalars, produced in collisions of nuclei and associated with the $\sigma$-field fluctuations, $(\delta \sigma)^2= < \sigma^2 >$, at the QCD critical point (critical fluctuations), is performed on the basis of a critical event generator (Critical Monte-Carlo) developed in our previous work. The aim of this analysis is to reveal suitable observables of critical QCD in the multiparticle environment of simulated events and select appropriate signatures of the critical point, associated with new and strong effects in nuclear collisions.