• The dynamics of an idealized, infinite, MIT-type flux tube is followed in time as the interior evolves from a pure gluon field to a $\overline q \ q$ plasma. We work in color U(1). $\overline q\ q$ pair formation is evaluated according to the Schwinger mechanism using the results of Brink and Pavel. The motion of the quarks toward the tube endcaps is calculated by a Boltzmann equation including collisions. The tube undergoes damped radial oscillations until the electric field settles down to zero. The electric field stabilizes the tube against pinch instabilities; when the field vanishes, the tube disintegrates into mesons. There is only one free parameter in the problem, namely the initial flux tube radius, to which the results are very sensitive. Among various quantities calculated is the mean energy of the emitted pions.
  • Charge independence and symmetry are approximate symmetries of nature. The observations of the small symmetry breaking effects and the consequences of those effects are reviewed. The effects of the mass difference between up and down quarks and the off shell dependence $q^2$ of $\rho^0$-$\omega$ mixing are stressed. In particular, I argue that models which predict a strong $q^2$ dependence of $\rho^0$-$\omega$ mixing seem also to predict a strong $q^2$ variation for the $\rho^0$-$\gamma^*$ matrix element, in contradiction with experiment.
  • A QCD-based treatment of projectile size fluctuations is used to compute inelastic diffractive cross sections $\sigma_{diff}$ for coherent hadron-nuclear processes. We find that fluctuations near the average size give the major contribution to the cross section with $ \le few \%$ contribution from small size configurations. The computed values of $\sigma_{diff}$ are consistent with the limited available data. The importance of coherent diffraction studies for a wide range of projectiles for high energy Fermilab fixed target experiments is emphasized. The implications of these significant color fluctuations for relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed.
  • Color transparency (CT) in high momentum transfer $(e,e' \vec p)$ reactions is explored. The spin of the proton and photon are treated explicitly, hence the name ``Vector CT". The Dirac distorted wave impulse approximation is used as a starting point; then CT effects are embedded. A hadronic basis is used to describe the struck proton as a wavepacket of physical baryon resonances. The effects of the wavepacket expansion on the normal component of the ejectile polarization, which vanishes in the limit of full CT, are investigated. This formalism is also applied to study CT effects in total cross sections, individual separated nuclear response functions, Fermi motion of the initial nucleon, non-zero size of the initial wavepacket and the effects of relativistic lower components. We show that including CT reduces the violations of current conservation (CC), a typical problem in calculations of this kind. The energy dependence of the normal polarization in $(e,e' \vec p)$ reactions is found to be slow. However, a measurement of the normal transverse response in a heavy nucleus, such as $^{208}Pb$ seems to afford the opportunity to see CT at quite low momentum transfers. The effects of Fermi motion are investigated, and choosing the momentum of the struck nucleon to be large leads to significant violations of CC.
  • New parameter free calculations including a variety of necessary kinematic and dynamic effects show that the results of BNL $(p,2p)$ measurements are consistent with the expectations of color transparency.