• Maximum disc decompositions of rotation curves place a dynamical upper limit to the mass attributable to stars in galaxies. The precise definition of this term, however, can be vague and varies in usage. We develop an algorithm to robustly quantify the maximum disc and we apply it to 175 galaxies from the SPARC database. For high-mass, high-surface-brightness galaxies, the maximum disc mass-to-light ratio is $\Upsilon_{\mathrm{disc}}^{max} < \ 0.7 \;{\mathrm{M}_\odot}/{\mathrm{L}_\odot}$ in the Spitzer 3.6 $\mu$m band. This is close to or only slightly above the expectations from stellar population models. For low-mass, low-surface-brightness galaxies, the maximum disc mass-to-light ratios are very high, which is unphysical for standard stellar population expectations. This confirms that low-mass, low-surface-brightness galaxies are sub-maximal. However, the maximum-disc procedure can still be applied to low-surface-brightness galaxies, providing further evidence for a local coupling between baryons and dynamics in galaxies.
  • The Milky Way and Andromeda galaxy are each surrounded by a thin plane of satellite galaxies that may be corotating. Cosmological simulations predict that most satellite galaxy systems are close to isotropic with random motions, so those two well-studied systems are often interpreted as rare statistical outliers. We test this assumption using the kinematics of satellite galaxies around the Centaurus A galaxy. Our statistical analysis reveals evidence for corotation in a narrow plane: of the 16 Centaurus A's satellites with kinematic data, 14 follow a coherent velocity pattern aligned with the long axis of their spatial distribution. In standard cosmology simulations, < 0.5% of Centaurus A-like systems show such behavior. Corotating satellite systems may be common in the Universe, challenging small-scale structure formation in the prevailing cosmological paradigm.
  • We study the link between baryons and dark matter in 240 galaxies with spatially resolved kinematic data. Our sample spans 9 dex in stellar mass and includes all morphological types. We consider (i) 153 late-type galaxies (LTGs; spirals and irregulars) with gas rotation curves from the SPARC database; (ii) 25 early-type galaxies (ETGs; ellipticals and lenticulars) with stellar and HI data from ATLAS^3D or X-ray data from Chandra; and (iii) 62 dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) with individual-star spectroscopy. We find that LTGs, ETGs, and "classical" dSphs follow the same radial acceleration relation: the observed acceleration (gobs) correlates with that expected from the distribution of baryons (gbar) over 4 dex. The relation coincides with the 1:1 line (no dark matter) at high accelerations but systematically deviates from unity below a critical scale of ~10^-10 m/s^2. The observed scatter is remarkably small (<0.13 dex) and largely driven by observational uncertainties. The residuals do not correlate with any global or local galaxy property (baryonic mass, gas fraction, radius, etc.). The radial acceleration relation is tantamount to a Natural Law: when the baryonic contribution is measured, the rotation curve follows, and vice versa. Including ultrafaint dSphs, the relation may extend by another 2 dex and possibly flatten at gbar<10^-12 m/s^2, but these data are significantly more uncertain. The radial acceleration relation subsumes and generalizes several well-known dynamical properties of galaxies, like the Tully-Fisher and Faber-Jackson relations, the "baryon-halo" conspiracies, and Renzo's rule.
  • Cosmological $N$-body simulations predict dark matter (DM) haloes with steep central cusps (e.g. NFW, Navarro et al. 1996). This contradicts observations of gas kinematics in low-mass galaxies that imply the existence of shallow DM cores. Baryonic processes such as adiabatic contraction and gas outflows can, in principle, alter the initial DM density profile, yet their relative contributions to the halo transformation remain uncertain. Recent high resolution, cosmological hydrodynamic simulations (Di Cintio et al. 2014, DC14) predict that inner density profiles depend systematically on the ratio of stellar to DM mass (M$_*$/M$_{\text{halo}}$). Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach, we test the NFW and the M$_*$/M$_{\text{halo}}$-dependent DC14 halo models against a sample of 147 galaxy rotation curves from the new {\it Spitzer} Photometry and Accurate Rotation Curves (SPARC) data set. These galaxies all have extended H{\small I} rotation curves from radio interferometry as well as accurate stellar mass density profiles from near-infrared photometry. The DC14 halo profile provides markedly better fits to the data compared to the NFW profile. Unlike NFW, the DC14 halo parameters found in our rotation curve fits naturally fall within two standard deviations of the mass-concentration relation predicted by $\Lambda$CDM and the stellar mass-halo mass relation inferred from abundance matching with few outliers. Halo profiles modified by baryonic processes are therefore more consistent with expectations from $\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\Lambda$CDM) cosmology and provide better fits to galaxy rotation curves across a wide range of galaxy properties than do halo models that neglect baryonic physics. Our results offer a solution to the decade long cusp-core discrepancy.
  • We report a correlation between the radial acceleration traced by rotation curves and that predicted by the observed distribution of baryons. The same relation is followed by 2693 points in 153 galaxies with very different morphologies, masses, sizes, and gas fractions. The correlation persists even when dark matter dominates. Consequently, the dark matter contribution is fully specified by that of the baryons. The observed scatter is small and largely dominated by observational uncertainties. This radial acceleration relation is tantamount to a natural law for rotating galaxies.
  • We use the SPARC (Spitzer Photometry & Accurate Rotation Curves) database to study the relation between the central surface density of stars Sstar and dynamical mass Sdyn in 135 disk galaxies (S0 to dIrr). We find that Sdyn correlates tightly with Sstar over 4 dex. This central density relation can be described by a double power law. High surface brightness galaxies are consistent with a 1:1 relation, suggesting that they are self-gravitating and baryon dominated in the inner parts. Low surface brightness galaxies systematically deviate from the 1:1 line, indicating that the dark matter contribution progressively increases but remains tightly coupled to the stellar one. The observed scatter is small (~0.2 dex) and largely driven by observational uncertainties. The residuals show no correlations with other galaxy properties like stellar mass, size, or gas fraction.
  • Collisional debris around interacting and post-interacting galaxies often display condensations of gas and young stars that can potentially form gravitationally bound objects: Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs). We summarise recent results on TDGs, which are originally published in Lelli et al. (2015, A&A). We study a sample of six TDGs around three different interacting systems, using high-resolution HI observations from the Very Large Array. We find that the HI emission associated to TDGs can be described by rotating disc models. These discs, however, would have undergone less than one orbit since the time of the TDG formation, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that TDGs are in dynamical equilibrium, we find that the ratio of dynamical mass to baryonic mass is consistent with one, implying that TDGs are devoid of dark matter. This is in line with the results of numerical simulations where tidal forces effectively segregate dark matter in the halo from baryonic matter in the disc, which ends up forming tidal tails and TDGs.
  • This is a brief rebuttal to arXiv:1502.03821, which claims to provide the first observational proof of dark matter interior to the solar circle. We point out that this result is not new, and can be traced back at least a quarter century.
  • Recent studies have shown that starburst dwarf galaxies have steeply rising rotation curves in their inner parts, pointing to a close link between the intense star formation and a centrally concentrated mass distribution (baryons and dark matter). More quiescent dwarf irregulars typically have slowly rising rotation curves, although some "compact" irregulars with steep, inner rotation curves exist. We analyze archival Hubble Space Telescope images of two nearby "compact" irregular galaxies (NGC 4190 and NGC 5204), which were selected solely on the basis of their dynamical properties and their proximity. We derive their recent star-formation histories by fitting color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations, and find that the star-formation properties of both galaxies are consistent with those of known starburst dwarfs. Despite the small sample, this strongly reinforces the notion that the starburst activity is closely related to the inner shape of the potential well.
  • Strong bursts of star formation in galaxies may be triggered either by internal or external mechanisms. We study the distribution and kinematics of the HI gas in the outer regions of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies, that have accurate star-formation histories from HST observations of resolved stellar populations. We find that starburst dwarfs show a variety of HI morphologies, ranging from heavily disturbed HI distributions with major asymmetries, long filaments, and/or HI-stellar offsets, to lopsided HI distributions with minor asymmetries. We quantify the outer HI asymmetry for both our sample and a control sample of typical dwarf irregulars. Starburst dwarfs have more asymmetric outer HI morphologies than typical irregulars, suggesting that some external mechanism triggered the starburst. Moreover, galaxies hosting an old burst (>100 Myr) have more symmetric HI morphologies than galaxies hosting a young one (<100 Myr), indicating that the former ones probably had enough time to regularize their outer HI distribution since the onset of the burst. We also investigate the nearby environment of these starburst dwarfs and find that most of them ($\sim$80$\%$) have at least one potential perturber at a projected distance <200 kpc. Our results suggest that the starburst is triggered either by past interactions/mergers between gas-rich dwarfs or by direct gas infall from the IGM.
  • For disk galaxies (spirals and irregulars), the inner circular-velocity gradient (inner steepness of the rotation curve) correlates with the central surface brightness with a slope of ~0.5. This implies that the central dynamical mass density scales almost linearly with the central baryonic density. Here I show that this empirical relation is consistent with a simple model where the central baryonic fraction f_bar(0) is fixed to 1 (no dark matter) and the observed scatter is due to differences in the baryonic mass-to-light ratio M_bar/L (ranging from 1 to 3 in the R-band) and in the characteristic thickness of the central stellar component dz (ranging from 100 to 500 pc). Models with lower baryonic fractions are possible, although they require some fine-tuning in the values of M_bar/L and dz. Regardless of the actual value of f_bar(0), the fact that different types of galaxies do not show strong variations in f_bar(0) is surprising, and may represent a challenge for models of galaxy formation in a LCDM cosmology.
  • We investigate the dynamics of starbursting dwarf galaxies, using both new and archival HI observations. We consider 18 nearby galaxies that have been resolved into single stars by HST observations, providing their star formation history and total stellar mass. We find that 9 objects have a regularly-rotating HI disk, 7 have a kinematically disturbed HI disk, and 2 show unsettled HI distributions. Two galaxies (NGC 5253 and UGC 6456) show a velocity gradient along the minor axis of the HI disk, that we interpret as strong radial motions. For galaxies with a regularly rotating disk we derive rotation curves, while for galaxies with a kinematically disturbed disk we estimate the rotation velocities in their outer parts. We derive baryonic fractions within about 3 optical scale lengths and find that, on average, baryons constitute at least 30$\%$ of the total mass. Despite the star formation having injected $\sim$10$^{56}$ ergs in the ISM in the last $\sim$500 Myr, these starbursting dwarfs have both baryonic and gas fractions similar to those of typical dwarf irregulars, suggesting that they did not eject a large amount of gas out of their potential wells.
  • UGC 4483 is a nearby Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxy. HST observations have resolved the galaxy into single stars and this has led to the derivation of its star formation history and to a direct estimate of its stellar mass. We have analysed archival VLA observations of the 21 cm line and found that UGC 4483 has a steeply-rising rotation curve which flattens in the outer parts at a velocity of ~20 km/s. Radial motions of ~5 km/s may also be present. As far as we know, UGC 4483 is the lowest-mass galaxy with a differentially rotating HI disk. The steep rise of the rotation curve indicates that there is a strong central concentration of mass. We have built mass models using the HST information on the stellar mass to break the disk-halo degeneracy: old stars contribute ~50$%$ of the observed rotation velocity at 2.2 disk scale-lengths. Baryons (gas and stars) constitute an important fraction of the total dynamical mass. These are striking differences with respect to typical dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs), which usually have slowly-rising rotation curves and are thought to be entirely dominated by dark matter. BCDs appear to be different from non-starbursting dIrrs in terms of their HI and stellar distributions and their internal dynamics. To their high central surface brightnesses and high central HI densities correspond strong central rotation-velocity gradients. This implies that the starburst is closely related with the gravitational potential and the concentration of gas. We discuss the implications of our results on the properties of the progenitors/descendants of BCDs.
  • For a rotating galaxy, the inner circular-velocity gradient d_{R}V(0) provides a direct estimate of the central dynamical mass density, including gas, stars, and dark matter. We consider 60 low-mass galaxies with high-quality HI and/or stellar rotation curves (including starbursting dwarfs, irregulars, and spheroidals), and estimate d_{R}V(0) as V(R_d)/R_d, where R_d is the galaxy scale-length. For gas-rich dwarfs, we find that V(R_d)/R_d correlates with the central surface brightness mu(0), the mean atomic gas surface density Sigma_gas, and the star formation rate surface density Sigma_SFR. Starbursting galaxies, such as blue compact dwarfs (BCDs), generally have higher values of V(R_d)/R_d than dwarf irregulars, suggesting that the starburst is closely related to the inner shape of the potential well. There are, however, some "compact" irregulars with values of V(R_d)/R_d similar to BCDs. Unless a redistribution of mass takes place, BCDs must evolve into compact irregulars. Rotating spheroidals in the Virgo cluster follow the same correlation between V(R_d)/R_d and mu(0) as gas-rich dwarfs. They have values of V(R_d)/R_d comparable to those of BCDs and compact irregulars, pointing at evolutionary links between these types of dwarfs. Finally, we find that, similarly to spiral galaxies and massive starbursts, the star-formation activity in dwarfs can be parametrized as Sigma_SFR = epsilon*Sigma_gas/t_orb, where t_orb is the orbital time and epsilon = 0.02.
  • I Zw 18 is a prototype Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD), characterized by a strong starburst and extremely low metallicity (Z ~ 0.02 Zsun). It has long been considered a candidate young galaxy in the Local Universe, but recent studies indicate the presence of old stars. We analysed archival VLA observations of the 21 cm line and found that the HI associated to the starburst region forms a compact fast-rotating disk. The HI column densities are very high, up to ~50-100 Msun/pc^2 (~0.6-1.2 x 10^22 atoms/cm^2). The rotation curve is flat with a steep rise in the inner parts, indicating the presence of a strong central concentration of mass. Mass models with a dark matter halo show that baryons may dominate the gravitational potential in the inner regions. A radial inflow/outflow motion of ~15 km/s is also present. I Zw 18 appears structurally different from typical dwarf irregulars in terms of gas distribution, stellar distribution and dynamics. It may be considered as a "miniature" high-surface-brightness disk galaxy. These dynamical properties must be tightly related to the starburst. They also shed new light on the question of the descendants of BCDs. There is also extended HI emission towards the outlying stellar complex I Zw 18 C and a ~13.5 kpc HI tail. An interaction/merger between gas-rich dwarfs is the most likely explanation for the starburst.
  • Giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies are commonly thought to be massive, dark matter dominated systems. However, this conclusion is based on highly uncertain rotation curves. We present here a new study of two prototypical GLSB galaxies: Malin 1 and NGC 7589. We re-analysed existing HI observations and derived new rotation curves, which were used to investigate the distributions of luminous and dark matter in these galaxies. In contrast to previous findings, the rotation curves of both galaxies show a steep rise in the central parts, typical of high surface brightness (HSB) systems. Mass decompositions with a dark matter halo show that baryons may dominate the dynamics of the inner regions. Indeed, a "maximum disk" fit gives stellar mass-to-light ratios in the range of values typically found for HSB galaxies. These results, together with other recent studies, suggest that GLSB galaxies are systems with a double structure: an inner HSB early-type spiral galaxy and an outer extended LSB disk. We also tested the predictions of MOND: the rotation curve of NGC 7589 is reproduced well, whereas Malin 1 represents a challenging test for the theory.