• We present the first results of the High cadence Transient Survey (HiTS), a survey whose objective is to detect and follow up optical transients with characteristic timescales from hours to days, especially the earliest hours of supernova (SN) explosions. HiTS uses the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) and a custom made pipeline for image subtraction, candidate filtering and candidate visualization, which runs in real-time to be able to react rapidly to the new transients. We discuss the survey design, the technical challenges associated with the real-time analysis of these large volumes of data and our first results. In our 2013, 2014 and 2015 campaigns we have detected more than 120 young SN candidates, but we did not find a clear signature from the short-lived SN shock breakouts (SBOs) originating after the core collapse of red supergiant stars, which was the initial science aim of this survey. Using the empirical distribution of limiting-magnitudes from our observational campaigns we measured the expected recovery fraction of randomly injected SN light curves which included SBO optical peaks produced with models from Tominaga et al. (2011) and Nakar & Sari (2010). From this analysis we cannot rule out the models from Tominaga et al. (2011) under any reasonable distributions of progenitor masses, but we can marginally rule out the brighter and longer-lived SBO models from Nakar & Sari (2010) under our best-guess distribution of progenitor masses. Finally, we highlight the implications of this work for future massive datasets produced by astronomical observatories such as LSST.
  • We present radio observations of 18 MIPSGAL bubbles performed at 5 GHz (6 cm) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in configuration B and BnA. The observations were aimed at understanding what kind of information high-resolution and high-sensitivity radio maps can supply on the circumstellar envelopes of different kinds of evolved stars and what their comparison with infrared images with similar resolution can tell us. We found that the 18 bubbles can be grouped into five categories according to their radio morphology. The three bubbles presenting a central point source in the radio images all correspond to luminous blue variable star candidates. Eleven bubbles show an elliptical shape and the total lack of a central object in the radio, and are likely associated with planetary nebulae. Under this assumption we derive their distance, their ionized mass and their distribution on the Galactic plane. We discuss the possibility that the MIPSGAL bubbles catalogue (428 objects) may contain a large fraction of all Galactic planetary nebulae located at a distance between 1.4 kpc and 6.9 kpc and lying in the MIPSGAL field of view. Among the remaining bubbles we identify also a H II region and a proto-planetary nebula candidate.
  • Aims. We present and study the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2010ev. Methods. We obtain and analyze multi-band optical light curves and optical-near-infrared spectroscopy at low and medium resolution spanning from -7 days to +300 days from the B-band maximum. Results. A photometric analysis shows that SN 2010ev is a SN Ia of normal brightness with a light curve shape of $\Delta m_{15}(B)=1.12 \pm 0.02$ and a stretch s = $0.94 \pm 0.01$ suffering significant reddening. From photometric and spectroscopic analysis, we deduce a color excess of $E(B - V) = 0.25 \pm 0.05$ and a reddening law of $R_v = 1.54 \pm 0.65$. Spectroscopically, SN 2010ev belongs to the broad-line SN Ia group, showing stronger than average Si II {\lambda}6355 absorption features. We also find that SN 2010ev is a high-velocity gradient SN, with a value of $164 \pm 7$ km s$^{-1}$ d$^{-1}$. The photometric and spectral comparison with other supernovae shows that SN 2010ev has similar colors and velocities to SN 2002bo and SN 2002dj. The analysis of the nebular spectra indicates that the [Fe II] {\lambda}7155 and [Ni II] {\lambda}7378 lines are redshifted, as expected for a high velocity gradient supernova. All these common intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the high velocity gradient (HVG) group are different from the low velocity gradient (LVG) normal SN Ia population and suggest significant variety in SN Ia explosions.
  • HST and ground based observations of the Type IIn SN 2010jl are analyzed, including photometry, spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, optical and NIR bands, 26-1128 days after first detection. At maximum the bolometric luminosity was $\sim 3\times10^{43}$ erg/s and even at 850 days exceeds $10^{42}$ erg/s. A NIR excess, dominating after 400 days, probably originates in dust in the circumstellar medium (CSM). The total radiated energy is $> 6.5\times10^{50}$ ergs, excluding the dust component. The spectral lines can be separated into one broad component due to electron scattering, and one narrow with expansion velocity $\sim 100$ km/s from the CSM. The broad component is initially symmetric around zero velocity but becomes blueshifted after $\sim 50$ days, while remaining symmetric about a shifted centroid velocity. Dust absorption in the ejecta is unlikely to explain the line shifts, and we attribute the shift instead to acceleration by the SN radiation. From the optical lines and the X-ray and dust properties, there is strong evidence for large scale asymmetries in the CSM. The ultraviolet lines indicate CNO processing in the progenitor, while the optical shows a number of narrow coronal lines excited by the X-rays. The bolometric light curve is consistent with a radiative shock in an $r^{-2}$ CSM with a mass loss rate of $\sim 0.1$ M_sun/yr. The total mass lost is $> 3$ M_sun. These properties are consistent with the SN expanding into a CSM characteristic of an LBV progenitor with a bipolar geometry. The apparent absence of nuclear processing is attributed to a CSM still opaque to electron scattering.
  • Observations of many SNe Ia with the UVOT instrument on the Swift satellite has revealed that there exists order to the differences in the UV-OPT colors of normal SNe. We examine UV-OPT color curves for 25 SNe Ia, dividing them into 4 groups, finding that ~1/3 of these SNe Ia have bluer UV-OPT colors than the larger group, with these "NUV-blue" SNe Ia 0.4 mag bluer than the "NUV-red" SNe Ia in u-v. Another group of events feature colors similar to NUV-red SNe Ia in the u-v to uvw1-v colors, but similar to the NUV-blue SNe Ia in the uvm2-v color. We name these events "MUV-blue". The last group initially has colors similar to NUV-red SNe Ia, but with color curves that feature more modest changes than the larger NUV-red group. These "irregular" events are comprised of all the NUV-red events with the broadest optical peaks, which leads us to consider this minor group a subset of the NUV-red group. When so separated and the accounting is made for the rapid time evolution of the UV-OPT colors, we find that the scatter in two NUV-OPT colors, u-v & uvw1-v, is at the level of the scatter in b-v. This finding is promising for extending the cosmological utilization of SNe Ia into the NUV. We generate spectrophotometry of SNe Ia that have been observed with HST and argue that there is a fundamental spectral difference in the 2900-3500A wavelength range, a range suggested to be dominated by absorption from iron-peak elements. The NUV-blue SNe Ia feature less NUV absorption than the NUV-red SNe Ia. We show that all the NUV-blue SNe Ia in this sample have also featured evidence of unburned carbon in optical spectra, whereas only one NUV-red SN Ia features that absorption line. Every NUV-blue event also exhibits a low gradient of the SiII 6355A absorption feature, but many NUV-red events also exhibit a low gradient, perhaps suggestive that NUV-blue events are a subset of the larger LVG group.
  • We present a first systematic comparison of superluminous Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at late epochs, including previously unpublished photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2007if, SN 2009dc and SNF20080723-012. Photometrically, the objects of our sample show a diverse late-time behaviour, some of them fading quite rapidly after a light-curve break at ~150-200d. The latter is likely the result of flux redistribution into the infrared, possibly caused by dust formation, rather than a true bolometric effect. Nebular spectra of superluminous SNe Ia are characterised by weak or absent [Fe III] emission, pointing at a low ejecta ionisation state as a result of high densities. To constrain the ejecta and 56Ni masses of superluminous SNe Ia, we compare the observed bolometric light curve of SN 2009dc with synthetic model light curves, focusing on the radioactive tail after ~60d. Models with enough 56Ni to explain the light-curve peak by radioactive decay, and at the same time sufficient mass to keep the ejecta velocities low, fail to reproduce the observed light-curve tail of SN 2009dc because of too much gamma-ray trapping. We instead propose a model with ~1 solar mass of 56Ni and ~2 solar masses of ejecta, which may be interpreted as the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) enshrouded by 0.6-0.7 solar masses of C/O-rich material, as it could result from a merger of two massive C/O WDs. This model reproduces the late light curve of SN 2009dc well. A flux deficit at peak may be compensated by light from the interaction of the ejecta with the surrounding material.
  • We present observations of the interacting transient SN 2009ip, from the start of the outburst in October 2012 until the end of the 2012 observing season. The transient reached a peak of $M_V$=-17.7 mag before fading rapidly, with a total integrated luminosity of 1.9$\times10^{49}$ erg over the period of August-December 2012. The optical and near infrared spectra are dominated by narrow emission lines, signaling a dense circumstellar environment, together with multiple components of broad emission and absorption in H and He at velocities between 0.5-1.2$\times10^4$ km s$^{-1}$\. We see no evidence for nucleosynthesized material in SN 2009ip, even in late-time pseudo-nebular spectra. We set a limit of $<$0.02 M$_{\odot}$\ on the mass of any synthesized $^{56}$Ni from the late time lightcurve. A simple model for the narrow Balmer lines is presented, and used to derive number densities for the circumstellar medium of between $\sim 10^{9}-10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$. Our near-infrared data does not show any excess at longer wavelengths. Our last data, taken in December 2012, shows that SN 2009ip has spectroscopically evolved to something quite similar to its appearance in late 2009, albeit with higher velocities. It is possible that neither of the eruptive and high luminosity events of SN 2009ip were induced by a core-collapse. We show that the peak and total integrated luminosity can be due to the efficient conversion of kinetic energy from colliding ejecta, and that around 0.05-0.1 M$_{\odot}$\ of material moving at 0.5-1$\times10^4$ km s$^{-1}$\ could comfortably produce the observed luminosity. The ejection of multiple shells, lack of evidence for nucleosynthesied elements and broad nebular lines, are all consistent with the pulsational-pair instability scenario. In this case the progenitor star may still exist, and will be observed after the current outburst fades.
  • We present the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the nearby (z = 0.059) spectroscopically confirmed type Ic supernova, SN 2010bh, associated with the soft, long-duration gamma-ray burst (X-ray flash) GRB 100316D. Intensive follow-up observations of SN 2010bh were performed at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the X-shooter and FORS2 instruments. Owing to the detailed temporal coverage and the extended wavelength range (3000--24800 A), we obtained an unprecedentedly rich spectral sequence among the hypernovae, making SN 2010bh one of the best studied representatives of this SN class. We find that SN 2010bh has a more rapid rise to maximum brightness (8.0 +/- 1.0 rest-frame days) and a fainter absolute peak luminosity (L_bol~3e42 erg/s) than previously observed SN events associated with GRBs. Our estimate of the ejected (56)Ni mass is 0.12 +/- 0.02 Msun. From the broad spectral features we measure expansion velocities up to 47,000 km/s, higher than those of SNe 1998bw (GRB 980425) and 2006aj (GRB 060218). Helium absorption lines He I lambda5876 and He I 1.083 microm, blueshifted by ~20,000--30,000 km/s and ~28,000--38,000 km/s, respectively, may be present in the optical spectra. However, the lack of coverage of the He I 2.058 microm line prevents us from confirming such identifications. The nebular spectrum, taken at ~186 days after the explosion, shows a broad but faint [O I] emission at 6340 A. The light-curve shape and photospheric expansion velocities of SN 2010bh suggest that we witnessed a highly energetic explosion with a small ejected mass (E_k ~ 1e52 erg and M_ej ~ 3 Msun). The observed properties of SN 2010bh further extend the heterogeneity of the class of GRB supernovae.
  • We present a study of the nebular phase spectra of a sample of Type II-Plateau supernovae with identified progenitors or restrictive limits. The evolution of line fluxes, shapes, and velocities are compared within the sample, and interpreted by the use of a spectral synthesis code. The small diversity within the dataset can be explained by strong mixing occurring during the explosion, and by recognising that most lines have significant contributions from primordial metals in the H envelope, which dominates the total ejecta mass in these type of objects. In particular, when using the [O I] 6300, 6364 Angstrom doublet for estimating the core mass of the star, care has to be taken to account for emission from primordial O in the envelope. Finally, a correlation between the H-alpha line width and the mass of 56Ni is presented, suggesting that higher energy explosions are associated with higher 56Ni production.
  • We present optical photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic observations of the Type II plateau supernova (SN) 2008in, which occurred in the outskirts of the nearly face-on spiral galaxy M 61. Photometric data in the X-rays, ultraviolet and near-infrared bands have been used to characterize this event. The SN field was imaged with the ROTSE-IIIb optical telescope about seven days before the explosion. This allowed us to constrain the epoch of the shock breakout to JD = 2454825.6. The duration of the plateau phase, as derived from the photometric monitoring, was ~ 98 days. The spectra of SN 2008in show a striking resemblance to those of the archetypal low-luminosity IIP SNe 1997D and 1999br. A comparison of ejecta kinematics of SN 2008in with the hydrodynamical simulations of Type IIP SNe by Dessart et al. (2010) indicates that it is a less energetic event (~ 5$\times10^{50}$ erg). However, the light curve indicates that the production of radioactive $^{56}$Ni is significantly higher than that in the low-luminosity SNe. Adopting an interstellar absorption along the SN direction of $A_V$ ~ 0.3 mag and a distance of 13.2 Mpc, we estimated a synthesized Ni mass of ~ 0.015 $M_{\odot}$. Employing semi-analytical formulae (Litvinova & Nadezhin 1985), we derived a pre-SN radius of ~ 126$R_{\odot}$, an explosion energy of ~ 5.4$\times10^{50}$ erg and a total ejected mass of ~ 16.7$M_{\odot}$. The latter indicates that the zero age main-sequence mass of the progenitor did not exceed 20$M_{\odot}$. Considering the above properties of SN 2008in, and its occurrence in a region of sub-solar metallicity ([O/H] ~ 8.44 dex), it is unlikely that fall-back of the ejecta onto a newly formed black hole occurred in SN 2008in. We therefore favor a low-energy explosion scenario of a relatively compact, moderate-mass progenitor star that generates a neutron star.
  • We present BV RI photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic investigation of a type II core-collapse supernova (SN) 2008gz, which occurred in a star forming arm and within a half-light radius (solar metallicity region) of a nearby spiral galaxy NGC 3672. The SN event was detected late and a detailed investigation of its light curves and spectra spanning 200 days suggest that it is an event of type IIP similar to archetypal SNe 2004et and 1999em. However, in contrast to other events of its class, the SN 2008gz exhibits rarely observed V magnitude drop of 1.5 over the period of a month during plateau to nebular phase. Using 0.21 mag of Av as a lower limit and a distance of 25.5 Mpc, we estimate synthesized $^{56}$Ni mass of 0.05 \pm 0.01 M* and a mid-plateau Mv of -16.6 \pm 0.2 mag. The photospheric velocity is observed to be higher than that was observed for SN 2004et at similar epochs, indicating explosion energy was comparable to or higher than SN 2004et. Similar trend was also seen for the expansion velocity of H-envelopes. By comparing its properties with other well studied events as well as by using a recent simulation of pre-SN models of Dessart, Livne & Waldman (2010), we infer an explosion energy range of 2 - 3 x 10$^{51}$ erg and this coupled with the observed width of the forbidden [O I] 6300-6364 {\AA} line at 275 days after the explosion gives an upper limit for the main-sequence (non-rotating, solar metallicity) progenitor mass of 17 M*. Our narrow-band H{\alpha} observation, taken nearly 560 days after the explosion and the presence of an emission kink at zero velocity in the Doppler corrected spectra of SN indicate that the event took place in a low luminosity star forming H II region.
  • We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby(redshift z = 0.004--0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way (MW) extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1_rc covering ~2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u ~3000--4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 ~2000-2400 A). The uvw1_rc-b colors show a scatter of ~0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2-uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, ~1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.
  • The merger of two white dwarfs (a.k.a. double degenerate merger) has often been cited as a potential progenitor of type Ia supernovae. Here we combine population synthesis, merger and explosion models with radiation-hydrodynamics light-curve models to study the implications of such a progenitor scenario on the observed type Ia supernova population. Our standard model, assuming double degenerate mergers do produce thermonuclear explosions, produces supernova light-curves that are broader than the observed type Ia sample. In addition, we discuss how the shock breakout and spectral features of these double degenerate progenitors will differ from the canonical bare Chandrasekhar-massed explosion models. We conclude with a discussion of how one might reconcile these differences with current observations.
  • We obtained optical photometry of SN 2003gs on 49 nights, from 2 to 494 days after T(B_max). We also obtained near-IR photometry on 21 nights. SN 2003gs was the first fast declining Type Ia SN that has been well observed since SN 1999by. While it was subluminous in optical bands compared to more slowly declining Type Ia SNe, it was not subluminous at maximum light in the near-IR bands. There appears to be a bimodal distribution in the near-IR absolute magnitudes of Type Ia SNe at maximum light. Those that peak in the near-IR after T(B_max) are subluminous in the all bands. Those that peak in the near-IR prior to T(B_max), such as SN 2003gs, have effectively the same near-IR absolute magnitudes at maximum light regardless of the decline rate Delta m_15(B). Near-IR spectral evidence suggests that opacities in the outer layers of SN 2003gs are reduced much earlier than for normal Type Ia SNe. That may allow gamma rays that power the luminosity to escape more rapidly and accelerate the decline rate. This conclusion is consistent with the photometric behavior of SN 2003gs in the IR, which indicates a faster than normal decline from approximately normal peak brightness.
  • Astronomers have proposed a number of mechanisms to produce supernova explosions. Although many of these mechanisms are now not considered primary engines behind supernovae, they do produce transients that will be observed by upcoming ground-based surveys and NASA satellites. Here we present the first radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the spectra and light curves from three of these "failed" supernovae: supernovae with considerable fallback, accretion induced collapse of white dwarfs, and energetic helium flashes (also known as type .Ia supernovae).
  • The only supernovae (SNe) to have shown early gamma-ray or X-ray emission thus far are overenergetic, broad-lined Type Ic SNe (Hypernovae - HNe). Recently, SN 2008D shows several novel features: (i) weak XRF, (ii) an early, narrow optical peak, (iii) disappearance of the broad lines typical of SNIc HNe, (iv) development of He lines as in SNeIb. Detailed analysis shows that SN 2008D was not a normal SN: its explosion energy (KE ~ 6*10^{51} erg) and ejected mass (~7 Msun) are intermediate between normal SNeIbc and HNe. We derive that SN 2008D was originally a ~30Msun star. When it collapsed a black hole formed and a weak, mildly relativistic jet was produced, which caused the XRF. SN 2008D is probably among the weakest explosions that produce relativistic jets. Inner engine activity appears to be present whenever massive stars collapse to black holes.