• In this paper we present a novel inference methodology to perform Bayesian inference for spatiotemporal Cox processes where the intensity function depends on a multivariate Gaussian process. Dynamic Gaussian processes are introduced to allow for evolution of the intensity function over discrete time. The novelty of the method lies on the fact that no discretisation error is involved despite the non-tractability of the likelihood function and infinite dimensionality of the problem. The method is based on a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm that samples from the joint posterior distribution of the parameters and latent variables of the model. The models are defined in a general and flexible way but they are amenable to direct sampling from the relevant distributions, due to careful characterisation of its components. The models also allow for the inclusion of regression covariates and/or temporal components to explain the variability of the intensity function. These components may be subject to relevant interaction with space and/or time. Real and simulated examples illustrate the methodology, followed by concluding remarks.
  • In this expository paper we abstract and describe a simple MCMC scheme for sampling from intractable target densities. The approach has been introduced in Gon\c{c}alves et al. (2017a) in the specific context of jump-diffusions, and is based on the Barker's algorithm paired with a simple Bernoulli factory type scheme, the so called 2-coin algorithm. In many settings it is an alternative to standard Metropolis-Hastings pseudo-marginal method for simulating from intractable target densities. Although Barker's is well-known to be slightly less efficient than Metropolis-Hastings, the key advantage of our approach is that it allows to implement the "marginal Barker's" instead of the extended state space pseudo-marginal Metropolis-Hastings, owing to the special form of the accept/reject probability. We shall illustrate our methodology in the context of Bayesian inference for discretely observed Wright-Fisher family of diffusions.
  • The number of studies dealing with RNA-Seq data analysis has experienced a fast increase in the past years making this type of gene expression a strong competitor to the DNA microarrays. This paper proposes a Bayesian model to detect down and up-regulated chromosome regions using RNA-Seq data. The methodology is based on a recent work developed to detect up-regulated regions in the context of microarray data. A hidden Markov model is developed by considering a mixture of Gaussian distributions with ordered means in a way that first and last mixture components are supposed to accommodate the under and overexpressed genes, respectively. The model is flexible enough to efficiently deal with the highly irregular spaced configuration of the data by assuming a hierarchical Markov dependence structure. The analysis of four cancer data sets (breast, lung, ovarian and uterus) is presented. Results indicate that the proposed model is selective in determining the regulation status, robust with respect to prior specifications and provides tools for a global or local search of under and overexpressed chromosome regions.
  • Traditional Item Response Theory models assume the distribution of the abilities of the population in study to be Gaussian. However, this may not always be a reasonable assumption, which motivates the development of more general models. This paper presents a generalised approach for the distribution of the abilities in dichotomous 3-parameter Item Response models. A mixture of normal distributions is considered, allowing for features like skewness, multimodality and heavy tails. A solution is proposed to deal with model identifiability issues without compromising the flexibility and practical interpretation of the model. Inference is carried out under the Bayesian Paradigm through a novel MCMC algorithm. The algorithm is designed in a way to favour good mixing and convergence properties and is also suitable for inference in traditional IRT models. The efficiency and applicability of our methodology is illustrated in simulated and real examples.
  • Making statistical inference for discretely observed jump-diffusion processes is a complex and challenging problem which motivates new methodological challenges. The infinite-dimensional nature of this problem has required from existing inference methodologies the use of discrete approximations that, naturally, represent a considerable source of error in the inference process. In this paper, we give the first general methodology for exact likelihood-based inference for discretely observed jump-diffusions. The exactness feature refers to the fact that the methods are free of discretisation error and Monte Carlo error is the only source of inaccuracy. The methods proposed perform either maximum likelihood or Bayesian estimation. Simulated and real examples are presented to illustrate the methodology.