• Sr$_2$IrO$_4$ is the archetype of the spin-orbit Mott insulator, but the nature of the metallic states that may emerge from this type of insulator is still not very well known. We study with angle-resolved photoemission the insulator-to-metal transition observed in Sr$_2$Ir$_{1-x}$Rh$_x$O$_4$ when Ir is substituted by Rh (0.02 < $x$ < 0.35). The originality of the Rh doping is that Ir and Rh, which are formally isovalent, adopt different charge states, a rather unusual and inhomogeneous situation. We show that the evolution to the metallic state can be essentially understood as a shift of the Fermi level into the lower Hubbard band of Sr$_2$IrO$_4$. The Mott gap appears quite insensitive to the introduction of up to $\sim$20\% holes in this band. The metallic phase, which forms for $x$ > 0.07, is not a Fermi liquid. It is characterized by the absence of quasiparticles, unrenormalized band dispersion compared to calculations and an $\sim$30-meV pseudo-gap on the entire Fermi surface.
  • A major remaining challenge in the superconducting cuprates is the unambiguous differentiation of the composition and electronic structure of the CuO$_2$ layers and those of the intermediate layers. The large c axis for these materials permits employing soft x-ray (930.3 eV) standing wave (SW) excitation in photoemission that yields atomic layer-by-atomic layer depth resolution of these properties. Applying SW photoemission to Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ (Bi2212) yields the depth distribution of atomic composition and the layer-resolved densities of states. We detect significant Ca presence in the SrO layers and oxygen bonding to three different cations. The layer-resolved valence electronic structure is found to be strongly influenced by the supermodulation structure--as determined by comparison to DFT calculations, by Ca-Sr intermixing, and by the Cu 3d-3d Coulomb interaction, further clarifying the complex interactions in this prototypical cuprate. Measurements of this type for other quasi-two-dimensional materials with large-c represent a promising future direction.
  • We address the role of non-local Coulomb correlations and short-range magnetic fluctuations in the high-temperature phase of Sr$_2$IrO$_4$ within state-of-the-art spectroscopic and first-principles theoretical methods. Introducing a novel cluster dynamical mean field scheme, we compute momentum-resolved spectral functions, which we find to be in excellent agreement with angle-resolved photoemission spectra. We show that while short-range antiferromagnetic fluctuations are crucial to account for the electronic properties of the material even in the high-temperature paramagnetic phase, long-range magnetic order is not a necessary ingredient of the insulating state. Upon doping, an exotic metallic state is generated, exhibiting cuprate-like pseudo-gap spectral properties, for which we propose a surprisingly simple theoretical mechanism.
  • Single-crystal Heusler atomic-scale superlattices that have been predicted to exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and half-metallicity have been successfully grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Superlattices consisting of full-Heusler Co$_2$MnAl and Fe$_2$MnAl with one to three unit cell periodicity were grown on GaAs (001), MgO (001), and Cr (001)/MgO (001). Electron energy loss spectroscopy maps confirmed clearly segregated epitaxial Heusler layers with high cobalt or high iron concentrations for samples grown near room temperature on GaAs (001). Superlattice structures grown with an excess of aluminum had significantly lower thin film shape anisotropy and resulted in an out-of-plane spin reorientation transition at temperatures below 200 K for samples grown on GaAs (001). Synchrotron-based spin resolved photoemission spectroscopy found that the superlattice structure improves the Fermi level spin polarization near the X point in the bulk Brillouin zone. Stoichiometric Co$_2$MnAl terminated superlattice grown on MgO (001) had a spin polarization of 95%, while a pure Co$_2$MnAl film had a spin polarization of only 65%.
  • We report the existence of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at the (001) surface of CaTiO3. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we find a hybridization between the d_xz and d_yz orbitals, not observed in the 2DESs at the surfaces of other ATiO3 perovskites, e.g. SrTiO3 or BaTiO3. Based on a comparison of the 2DES properties in these three materials, we show how the electronic structure of the 2DES (bandwidth, orbital order and electron density) is coupled to different typical lattice distortions in perovskites. The orbital hybridization in orthorhombic CaTiO3 results from the rotation of the oxygen octahedra, which can also occur at the interface of oxide heterostructures to compensate strain. More generally, the control of the orbital order in 2DES by choosing different A-site cations in perovskites offers a new gateway towards 2DESs in oxide heterostructures beyond SrTiO3.
  • Engineered lattices in condensed matter physics, such as cold atom optical lattices or photonic crystals, can have fundamentally different properties from naturally-occurring electronic crystals. Here, we report a novel type of artificial quantum matter lattice. Our lattice is a multilayer heterostructure built from alternating thin films of topological and trivial insulators. Each interface within the heterostructure hosts a set of topologically-protected interface states, and by making the layers sufficiently thin, we demonstrate for the first time a hybridization of interface states across layers. In this way, our heterostructure forms an emergent atomic chain, where the interfaces act as lattice sites and the interface states act as atomic orbitals, as seen from our measurements by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). By changing the composition of the heterostructure, we can directly control hopping between lattice sites. We realize a topological and a trivial phase in our superlattice band structure. We argue that the superlattice may be characterized in a significant way by a one-dimensional topological invariant, closely related to the invariant of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. Our topological insulator heterostructure demonstrates a novel experimental platform where we can engineer band structures by directly controlling how electrons hop between lattice sites.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission to study the three dimensional (3D) electronic structure of Co pnictides ACo2As2 with A=Ba, Sr, Ca or a mixture of Sr and Ca. These compounds are isostructural to Fe based superconductors, but have one more electron in the Co $3d$ orbitals. Going from Ba to Ca, they become more and more 3D, eventually forming a 'collapsed' tetragonal phase, where the distance between CoAs layers is markedly reduced. The observed periodicity of the 3D electronic structure matches in each case that expected from the distance between the planes in the bulk. However, the electronic structure is better fitted by a calculation corresponding to a slab with 2 CoAs layers than to the bulk structure. We attribute this to subtle modifications of the 2D electronic structure induced by the truncation of the 3D dispersion at the surface in the ARPES measurement. We further study how this affects the electronic properties. We show that, despite this distortion, the electronic structure of CaCo2As2 is essentially that expected for a collapsed phase. Electronic correlations produce a renormalization of the electronic structure by a factor 1.4, which is not affected by the transition to the collapsed state. On the other hand, a small shift of the Fermi level reduces the density of states in the eg bands and suppresses the magnetic transition expected in CaCo2As2. Our study evidences that observing the bulk periodicity is not sufficient to ensure bulk sensitivity. It further gives direct information on the role of 3D interactions, mostly governed by Co-As hybridization, among eg and t2g orbitals. It is also useful to better understand the electronic structure of Fe superconductors and the range of validity of ARPES measurements.
  • The large anisotropy in the electronic properties across a structural transition in several correlated systems has been identified as the key manifestation of electronic nematic order, breaking rotational symmetry. In this context, FeSe is attracting tremendous interest, since electronic nematicity develops over a wide range of temperatures, allowing accurate experimental investigation. Here we combine angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and theoretical calculations based on a realistic multi-orbital model to unveil the microscopic mechanism responsible for the evolution of the electronic structure of FeSe across the nematic transition. We show that the self-energy corrections due to the exchange of spin fluctuations between hole and electron pockets are responsible for an orbital-dependent shrinking of the Fermi Surface that affects mainly the $xz/yz$ parts of the Fermi surface. This result is consistent with our experimental observation of the Fermi Surface in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, that includes the $xy$ electron sheet that was not clearly resolved before. In the low-temperature nematic phase, we experimentally confirm the appearance of a large ($\sim$ 50meV) $xz/yz$ splittings. It can be well reproduced in our model by assuming a moderate splitting between spin fluctuations along the $x$ and $y$ crystallographic directions. Our mechanism shows how the full entanglement between orbital and spin degrees of freedom can make a spin-driven nematic transition equivalent to an effective orbital order.
  • It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ may realize such a Type II Weyl fermion. One crucial challenge is that the Weyl points in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are predicted to lie above the Fermi level. Here, by studying a simple model for a Type II Weyl cone, we clarify the importance of accessing the unoccupied band structure to demonstrate that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is a Weyl semimetal. Then, we use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe the unoccupied band structure of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. For the first time, we directly access states $> 0.2$ eV above the Fermi level. By comparing our results with $\textit{ab initio}$ calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. Our work opens the way to studying the unoccupied band structure as well as the time-domain relaxation dynamics of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ and related transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • A synergistic effect between strong electron correlation and spin-orbit interaction (SOI) has been theoretically predicted to result in a new topological state of quantum matter on Kondo insulators (KIs), so-called topological Kondo insulators (TKIs). One TKI candidate has been experimentally observed on the KI SmB6(001), and the origin of the surface states (SS) and the topological order of SmB6 has been actively discussed. Here, we show a metallic SS on the clean surface of another TKI candidate YbB12(001), using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The SS showed temperature-dependent reconstruction corresponding with the Kondo effect observed for bulk states. Despite the low-temperature insulating bulk, the reconstructed SS with c-f hybridization was metallic, forming a closed Fermi contour surrounding $\bar{\Gamma}$ on the surface Brillouin zone and agreeing with the theoretically expected behavior for SS on TKIs. These results demonstrate the temperature-dependent holistic reconstruction of two-dimensional states localized on KIs surface driven by the Kondo effect.
  • We study with ARPES the renormalization and quasiparticle lifetimes of the $d_{xy}$ and $d_{xz}$/$d_{yz}$ orbitals in two iron pnictides, LiFeAs and Ba(Fe$_{0.92}$Co$_{0.08}$)$_2$As$_2$ (Co8). We find that both quantities depend on orbital character rather than on the position on the Fermi Surface (for example hole or electron pocket). In LiFeAs, the renormalizations are larger for $d_{xy}$, while they are similar on both types of orbitals in Co8. The most salient feature, which proved robust against all the ARPES caveats we could think of, is that the lifetimes for $d_{xy}$ exhibit a markedly different behavior than those for $d_{xz}$/$d_{yz}$. They have smaller values near $E_F$ and exhibit larger $\omega$ and temperature dependences. While the behavior of $d_{xy}$ is compatible with a Fermi liquid description, it is not the case for $d_{xz}$/$d_{yz}$. This situation should have important consequences for the physics of iron pnictides, which have not been considered up to now. More generally, it raises interesting questions on how a Fermi liquid regime can be established in a multiband system with small effective bandwidths.
  • Weyl semimetals have sparked intense research interest, but experimental work has been limited to the TaAs family of compounds. Recently, a number of theoretical works have predicted that compounds in the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series are Weyl semimetals. Such proposals are particularly exciting because Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ has a quasi two-dimensional crystal structure well-suited to many transport experiments, while WTe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ have already been the subject of numerous proposals for device applications. However, with available ARPES techniques it is challenging to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. According to the predictions, the Weyl points are above the Fermi level, the system approaches two critical points as a function of doping, there are many irrelevant bulk bands, the Fermi arcs are nearly degenerate with bulk bands and the bulk band gap is small. Here, we study Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for $x = 0.07$ and 0.45 using pump-probe ARPES. The system exhibits a dramatic response to the pump laser and we successfully access states $> 0.2$eV above the Fermi level. For the first time, we observe direct, experimental signatures of Fermi arcs in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$, which agree well with theoretical calculations of the surface states. However, we caution that the interpretation of these features depends sensitively on free parameters in the surface state calculation. We comment on the prospect of conclusively demonstrating a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$.
  • A 1D metallic surface state was created on an anisotropic InSb(001) surface covered with Bi. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) showed a 1D Fermi contour with almost no 2D distortion. Close to the Fermi level ($E_{\rm F}$), the angle-integrated photoelectron spectra showed power-law scaling with the binding energy and temperature. The ARPES plot above $E_{\rm F}$ obtained thanks to thermally broadened Fermi edge at room temperature showed a 1D state with continuous metallic dispersion across $E_{\rm F}$ and power-law intensity suppression around $E_{\rm F}$. These results strongly suggest a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid on the Bi/InSb(001) surface.
  • Half Metal Magnets are of great interest in the field of spintronics because of their potential full spin-polarization at the Fermi level and low magnetization damping. The high Curie temperature and predicted 0.7eV minority spin gap make the Heusler alloy Co2MnSi very promising for applications.We investigated the half-metallic magnetic character of this alloy using spin-resolved photoemission, ab initio calculation and ferromagnetic resonance. At the surface of Co2MnSi, a gap in the minority spin channel is observed, leading to 100% spin polarization. However, this gap is 0.3 eV below the Fermi level and a minority spin state is observed at the Fermi level. We show that a minority spin gap at the Fermi energy can nevertheless be recovered either by changing the stoichiometry of the alloy or by covering the surface by Mn, MnSi or MgO. This results in extremely small damping coefficients reaching values as low as 7x 10-4.
  • MnSi has been extensively studied for five decades, nonetheless detailed information on the Fermi surface (FS) symmetry is still lacking. This missed information prevented from a comprehensive understanding the nature of the magnetic interaction in this material. Here, by performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on high-quality MnSi films epitaxially grown on Si(111), we unveil the FS symmetry and the evolution of the electronic structure across the paramagnetic-helimagnetic transition at T$_C$ $\sim$ 40 K, along with the appearance of sharp quasiparticle emission below T$_C$. The shape of the resulting FS is found to fulfill robust nesting effects. These effects can be at the origin of strong magnetic fluctuations not accounted for by state-of-art quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation. From this perspective, the unforeseen quasiparticle damping detected in the paramagnetic phase and relaxing only below T$_C$, along with the persistence of the d-bands splitting well above T$_C$, at odds with a simple Stoner model for itinerant magnetism, open the search for exotic magnetic interactions favored by FS nesting and affecting the quasiparticles lifetime.