• We present a study of the membership of the Hyades open cluster, derive kinematically-modelled parallaxes of its members, and study the colour-absolute magnitude diagram of the cluster. We use Gaia DR1 Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) data complemented by Hipparcos-2 data for bright stars not contained in TGAS. We supplement the astrometric data with radial velocities collected from a dozen literature sources. By assuming that all cluster members move with the mean cluster velocity to within the velocity dispersion, we use the observed and the expected motions of the stars to determine individual cluster membership probabilities. We subsequently derive improved parallaxes through maximum-likelihood kinematic modelling of the cluster. This method has an iterative component to deal with 'outliers', caused for instance by double stars or escaping members. Our method extends an existing method and supports the mixed presence of stars with and without radial velocities. We find 251 candidate members, 200 of which have a literature radial velocity, and 70 of which are new candidate members with TGAS astrometry. The cluster is roughly spherical in its centre but significantly flattened at larger radii. The observed colour-absolute magnitude diagram shows a clear binary sequence. The kinematically-modelled parallaxes that we derive are a factor ~1.7 / 2.9 more precise than the TGAS / Hipparcos-2 values and allow to derive an extremely sharp main sequence. This sequence shows evidence for fine-detailed structure which is elegantly explained by the full spectrum turbulence model of convection.
  • The color-magnitude diagrams of many Magellanic Cloud clusters (with ages up to 2 billion years) display extended turnoff regions where the stars leave the main sequence, suggesting the presence of multiple stellar populations with ages which may differ even by hundreds million years (Mackey et al. 2008, Milone et al. 2009, Girardi et al. 2011). A strongly debated question is whether such an extended turnoff is instead due to populations with different stellar rotations (Girardi et al. 2011, Goudfrooij et al. 2011, Rubele et al. 2013, Li et al. 2014). The recent discovery of a `split' main sequence in some younger clusters (about 80--400Myr) added another piece to this puzzle. The blue (red) side of the main sequence is consistent with slowly (rapidly) rotating stellar models (D'Antona et al. 2015, Milone et al. 2016, Correnti et al. 2017, Milone et al 2016), but a complete theoretical characterization of the observed color-magnitude diagram appeared to require also an age spread (Correnti et al. 2017). We show here that, in three clusters so far analyzed, if the blue main sequence stars are interpreted with models that have been always slowly rotating, they must be about 30% younger than the rest of the cluster. If they are instead interpreted as stars initially rapidly rotating, but that have later slowed down, the age difference disappears, and "braking" also helps to explain the apparent age differences of the extended turnoff. The age spreads in Magellanic Cloud clusters are a manifestation of rotational stellar evolution. Observational tests are suggested.
  • The UV-initiative Hubble Space Telescope Treasury survey of Galactic globular clusters provides a new window into the phenomena that shape the morphological features of the horizontal branch (HB). Using this large and homogeneous catalog of UV and blue photometry, we demonstrate that the HB exhibits discontinuities that are remarkably consistent in color (effective temperature). This consistency is apparent even among some of the most massive clusters hosting multiple distinct sub-populations (such as NGC 2808, omega Cen, and NGC 6715), demonstrating that these phenomena are primarily driven by atmospheric physics that is independent of the underlying population properties. However, inconsistencies arise in the metal-rich clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441, where the discontinuity within the blue HB (BHB) distribution shifts ~1,000 K to 2,000 K hotter. We demonstrate that this shift is likely due to a large helium enhancement in the BHB stars of these clusters, which in turn affects the surface convection and evolution of such stars. Our survey also increases the number of Galactic globular clusters known to host blue-hook stars (also known as late hot flashers) from 6 to 23 clusters. These clusters are biased toward the bright end of the globular cluster luminosity function, confirming that blue-hook stars tend to form in the most massive clusters with significant self-enrichment.
  • We interpret the stellar population of $\omega$ Centauri by means of a population synthesis analysis, following the most recent observational guidelines for input metallicities, helium and [(C+N+O)/Fe] contents. We deal at the same time with the main sequences, sub-giant and horizontal branch data. The reproduction of the observed colour magnitude features is very satisfying and bears interesting hints concerning the evolutionary history of this peculiar stellar ensemble. Our main results are: 1) no significant spread in age is required to fit the colour-magnitude diagram. Indeed we can use coeval isochrones for the synthetic populations, and we estimate that the ages fall within a $\sim 0.5$ Gyr time interval; in particular the most metal rich population can be coeval (in the above meaning) with the others, if its stars are very helium--rich (Y$\sim$0.37) and with the observed CNO enhancement ([(C+N+O)/Fe] = + 0.7); 2) a satisfactory fit of the whole HB is obtained, consistent with the choice of the populations providing a good reproduction of the main sequence and sub giant data. 3) the split in magnitude observed in the red HB is well reproduced assuming the presence of two stellar populations in the two different sequences observed: a metal poor population made of stars evolving from the blue side (luminous branch) and a metal richer one whose stars are in a stage closer to the zero age HB (dimmer branch). This modelization also fits satisfactorily the period and the [Fe/H] distribution of the RR Lyrae stars.
  • Horizontal Branch stars belong to an advanced stage in the evolution of the oldest stellar galactic population, occurring either as field halo stars or grouped in globular clusters. The discovery of multiple populations in these clusters, that were previously believed to have single populations gave rise to the currently accepted theory that the hottest horizontal branch members (the blue hook stars, which had late helium-core flash ignition, followed by deep mixing) are the progeny of a helium-rich "second generation" of stars. It is not known why such a supposedly rare event (a late flash followed by mixing) is so common that the blue hook of {\omega} Cen contains \sim 30% of horizontal branch stars 10 , or why the blue hook luminosity range in this massive cluster cannot be reproduced by models. Here we report that the presence of helium core masses up to \sim 0.04 solar masses larger than the core mass resulting from evolution is required to solve the luminosity range problem. We model this by taking into account the dispersion in rotation rates achieved by the progenitors, whose premain sequence accretion disc suffered an early disruption in the dense environment of the cluster's central regions where second-generation stars form. Rotation may also account for frequent late-flash-mixing events in massive globular clusters.
  • We investigate the viability of a model in which the chemical anomalies among Globular Cluster stars are due to accretion of gas onto the protostellar discs of low mass stars. This model has been suggested as a way to reduce the large initial cluster masses required by other models for the formation of multiple stellar generations. We numerically follow the evolution of the accreting stars, and we show that the structure of the seed star does not remain fully convective for the whole duration of the accretion phase. Stellar populations showing discrete abundances of helium in the core, that seem to be present in some clusters, might be formed with this mechanism only if accretion occurs before the core of the stars become radiative (within 2-3Myr) or if a thermohaline instability is triggered, to achieve full mixing after the accretion phase ends. We also show that the lithium abundances in accreted structures may vary by orders of magnitude in equal masses obtained by accreting different masses. In addition, the same thermohaline mixing which could provide a homogeneous helium distribution down to the stellar center, would destroy any lithium surviving in the envelope, so that both helium homogeneity and lithium survival require that the accretion phase be limited to the first couple of million years of the cluster evolution. Such a short accretion phase strongly reduces the amount of processed matter available, and reintroduces the requirement of an extremely large initial mass for the protocluster.
  • Large star-to-star variations of the abundances of proton-capture elements, such as Na and O, in globular clusters (GCs) are interpreted as the effect of internal pollution resulting from the presence of multiple stellar populations. To better constrain this scenario we investigate the abundance distribution of the heavy element rubidium (Rb) in NGC 6752, NGC 1904, and NGC 104 (47 Tuc). Combining the results from our sample with those in the literature, we found that Rb exhibits no star-to-star variations, regardless the cluster metallicity, with the possible intriguing, though very uncertain, exception of the metal-rich bulge cluster NGC 6388. If no star-to-star variations will be confirmed for all GCs, it implies that the stellar source of the proton-capture element variations must not have produced significant amounts of Rb. This element is observed to be enhanced at extremely high levels in intermediate-mass AGB (IM-AGB) stars in the Magellanic Clouds (i.e., at a metallicity similar to 47 Tuc and NGC 6388). This may present a challenge to this popular candidate polluter, unless the mass range of the observed IM-AGB stars does not participate in the formation of the second-generation stars in GCs. A number of possible solutions are available to resolve this conundrum, also given that the Magellanic Clouds observations are very uncertain and may need to be revised. The fast rotating massive stars scenario would not face this potential problem as the slow mechanical winds of these stars during their main-sequence phase do not carry any Rb enhancements; however, these candidates face even bigger issues such as the production of Li and the close over-imposition with core-collapse supernova timescales. Observations of Sr, Rb, and Zr in metal-rich clusters such as NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 are sorely needed to clarify the situation.
  • In this paper we study the long-term dynamical evolution of multiple-population clusters, focusing on the evolution of the spatial distributions of the first- (FG) and second-generation (SG) stars.In previous studies we have suggested that SG stars formed from the ejecta of FG AGB stars are expected initially to be concentrated in the cluster inner regions. Here, by means of N-body simulations, we explore the time scales and the dynamics of the spatial mixing of the FG and the SG populations and their dependence on the SG initial concentration.Our simulations show that, as the evolution proceeds, the radial profile of the SG/FG number ratio, NSG/NFG, is characterized by three regions: 1) a flat inner part; 2) a declining part in which FG stars are increasingly dominant; and 3) an outer region where the NSG/NFG profile flattens again (the NSG/NFG profile may rise slightly again in the outermost cluster regions). The radial variation of NSG/NFG implies that the fraction of SG stars determined by observations covering a limited range of radial distances is not, in general, equal to the SG global fraction, (NSG/NFG)glob. The distance at which NSG/NFG equals (NSG/NFG)glob is approximately between 1 and 2 cluster half-mass radii. The results of our simulations suggest that in many Galactic globular clusters the SG should still be more spatially concentrated than the FG.[abridged]
  • We follow the scenario of formation of second generation stars in globular clusters by matter processed by hot bottom burning (HBB) in massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and Super AGB stars (SAGB). In the cluster NGC 2419 we assume the presence of an extreme population directly formed from the AGB and SAGB ejecta, so we can directly compare the yields for a metallicity Z=0.0003 with the chemical inventory of the cluster NGC 2419. At such a low metallicity, the HBB temperatures (well above 108K) allow a very advanced nucleosynthesis. Masses of about 6Mo deplete Mg and synthesize Si, going beyond Al, so this latter element results only moderately enhanced; sodium can not be enhanced. The models are consistent with the observations, although the predicted Mg depletion is not as strong as in the observed stars. We predict that the oxygen abundance must be depleted by a huge factor in the Mg poor stars. The HBB temperatures are close to the region where other p capture reactions on heavier nuclei become possible. We show that high potassium abundance found in Mg poor stars can be achieved during HBB, by p captures on the argon nuclei, if the relevant cross section(s) are larger than listed in the literature or if the HBB temperature is higher. Finally, we speculate that some calcium production is occurring owing to proton capture on potassium. We emphasize the importance of a strong effort to measure a larger sample of abundances in this cluster.
  • In order to account for the chemical composition of a stellar second generation (SG), Globular Clusters (GCs) evolution models based on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) scenario so far included only the yields available for the massive AGB stars, while the possible role of super-AGB ejecta was either extrapolated or not considered. In this work, we explore the role of super-AGB ejecta using yields recently calculated by Ventura and D'Antona. Models of clusters showing extended Na-O anticorrelations, like NGC 2808, indicate that a SG formation history similar to that outlined in our previous work is required: formation of an Extreme population with very large helium content from the pure ejecta of super-AGB stars, followed by formation of an Intermediate population by dilution of stellar ejecta with pristine gas. The very O-poor Na-rich Extreme stars can be accounted for once deep-mixing is assumed in SG giants forming in a gas with helium abundance Y> 0.34, which significantly reduces the atmospheric oxygen content, while preserving the sodium abundance. On the other hand, for clusters showing a mild O-Na anticorrelation, like M 4, the use of the new yields broadens the range of SG formation routes leading to abundance patterns consistent with observations. It is shown that models in which SG stars form only from super-AGB ejecta promptly diluted with pristine gas can reproduce the observations. We discuss the variety of small helium variations occurring in this model and its relevance for the horizontal branch morphology. In some of these models the duration of the SG formation episode can be as short as \sim10 Myr; the formation time of the SG is thus compatible with the survival of a cooling flow in the GC, previous to the explosion of the SG core collapse supernovae. We also explore models with formation of multiple populations in individual bursts, each lasting no longer than \sim10 Myr.
  • We measured temperatures, gravities, and masses for a large sample of blue horizontal branch stars in omega Centauri, comparing the results with theoretical expectations for canonical and He-enriched stars, and with previous measurements in three other clusters. The measured gravities of omega Cen stars are systematically lower than canonical models, in agreement with expectations for He-enriched stars, and contrary to that observed in the comparison clusters. However, the derived masses are unrealistically too low as well. This cannot be explained by low gravities alone, nor by any of the other parameters entering in the calculation. We find that the same stars are not brighter than their analogs in the other clusters, contrary to the expectations of the He-enrichment scenario. The interpretation of the results is thus not straightforward, but they reveal an intrinsic, physical difference between HB stars in omega Cen and in the three comparison clusters.
  • The discovery of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters raises fundamental questions concerning the formation and dynamical history of these systems. In a previous study aimed at exploring the formation of second-generation (SG) stars from the ejecta of first-generation (FG) AGB stars, and the subsequent dynamical evolution of the cluster, we showed that SG stars are expected to form in a dense subsystem concentrated in the inner regions of the FG cluster. In this paper we explore the implications of the structural properties of multiple-population clusters, and in particular the presence of the inner SG subsystem, for the disruption of binary stars. We quantify the enhancement of the binary disruption rate due to the presence of the central SG subsystem for a number of different initial conditions. Our calculations show that SG binaries, which are assumed to be more concentrated in the cluster inner regions, are disrupted at a substantially larger rate than FG binaries. Assuming a similar initial fraction of FG and SG binaries, our dynamical study indicates that the SG population is now expected to contain a significantly smaller binary fraction than the FG population.
  • The stars in globular clusters are known to differ in their surface chemistry: the spectroscopic investigations in the last decades outlined the presence of star-to-star differences in the abundances of the light elements, up to aluminium (and possibly silicon), suggesting that some stars were contaminated by an advanced proton-capture nucleosynthesis. The AGB stars are one of the most promising candidates in producing the pollution of the intra-cluster medium, via the ejection of gas processed by Hot Bottom Burning, from which new stellar generations are formed. This work is focused on the degree of nucleosynthesis involving magnesium, aluminium and silicon that these sources may experience. The key ingredient to determine the degree of magnesium depletion, and the amount of aluminium that can be produced, is the rate of proton capture on Mg25, forming Al26; an increase in this cross-section by a factor 2 with respect to the highest value allowed by the NACRE compilation allows to reproduce the extent of the Mg-depletion observed, and is in qualitative agreement with the positive Al-Si correlation observed in a few clusters. The main uncertainties associated with the macro- and micro-physics input, are discussed and commented, and the comparison with recent spectroscopic results for the globular cluster showing some degree of Mg-Al anticorrelation and Al-Si correlation is presented.
  • The star-to-star differences in the abundance of light elements observed in the globular clusters (GCs) can be explained assuming that a second generation (SG) of stars form in the gas ejected by the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars belonging to a first stellar generation. However, while Na and O appear to be anticorrelated in the cluster stars, from the stellar models they turn out to be correlated into the AGB ejecta. In order to reconcile the stellar theory with the observational findings, all the GC models invoke an early dilution of AGB ejecta with pristine gas occurring during the SG formation. Despite a vast consensus about the occurrence of such dilution, the physical process behind it is still unknown. In the present paper we set some general constraints on the pristine gas dynamics and on the possible amount of pristine gas involved in the SG formation, making use of a one zone chemical model. We find that such a dilution is a necessary ingredient in the SG star formation to explain the observed abundance patterns. We confirm the conclusion of our previous works showing that clusters must have been initially much more massive. We also show that models assuming that clusters had an initial mass similar to their current one, and adopting a large fraction of pristine gas to form SG stars, fail to reproduce the observed Na-O anticorrelation and are not viable. We finally show that the dilution event should be restricted in time, rather than extended for the all duration of the SG formation.
  • We investigate the physical and chemical evolution of population II stars with initial masses in the range 6.5-8 Msun, which undergo an off centre carbon ignition under partially degenerate conditions, followed by a series of thermal pulses, and supported energetically by a CNO burning shell, above a O-Ne degenerate core. In agreement with the results by other research groups, we find that the O-Ne core is formed via the formation of a convective flame that proceeds to the centre of the star. The evolution which follows is strongly determined by the description of the mass loss mechanism. Use of the traditional formalism with the super-wind phase favours a long evolution with many thermal pulses, and the achievement of an advanced nucleosynthesis, due the large temperatures reached by the bottom of the external mantle. Use of a mass loss recipe with a strong dependence on the luminosity favours an early consumption of the stellar envelope, so that the extent of the nucleosynthesis, and thus the chemical composition of the ejecta, is less extreme. The implications for the multiple populations in globular clusters are discussed. If the "extreme" populations present in the most massive clusters are a result of direct formation from the super-AGB ejecta, their abundances may constitute a powerful way of calibrating the mass loss rate of this phase. This calibration will also provide informations on the fraction of super-AGBs exploding as single e-capture supernova, leaving a neutron star remnant in the cluster.
  • Many observational studies have revealed the presence of multiple stellar generations in Galactic globular clusters. These studies suggest that second-generation stars make up a significant fraction of the current mass of globular clusters, with the second-generation mass fraction ranging from ~50 to 80 per cent in individual clusters. In this Letter we carry out hydrodynamical simulations to explore the dependence of the mass of second-generation stars on the initial mass and structural parameters and stellar initial mass function (IMF) of the parent cluster. We then use the results of these simulations to estimate the fraction, f_{SG,H}, of the mass of the Galactic stellar halo composed of second-generation stars that originated in globular clusters. We study the dependence of f_{SG,H} on the parameters of the initial mass function of the Galactic globular cluster system. For a broad range of initial conditions, we find that the fraction of mass of the Galactic stellar halo in second-generation stars is always small, f_{SG,H}<4-6 per cent for a Kroupa-1993 IMF and f_{SG,H}<7-9 per cent for a Kroupa-2001 IMF.
  • A large number of spectroscopic studies have provided evidence of the presence of multiple populations in globular clusters by revealing patterns in the stellar chemical abundances. This paper is aimed at studying the origin of these abundance patterns. We explore a model in which second generation (SG) stars form out of a mix of pristine gas and ejecta of the first generation of asymptotic giant branch stars. We first study the constraints imposed by the spectroscopic data of SG stars in globular clusters on the chemical properties of the asymptotic and super asymptotic giant branch ejecta. With a simple one-zone chemical model, we then explore the formation of the SG population abundance patterns focussing our attention on the Na-O, Al-Mg anticorrelations and on the helium distribution function. We carry out a survey of models and explore the dependence of the final SG chemical properties on the key parameters affecting the gas dynamics and the SG formation process. Finally, we use our chemical evolution framework to build specific models for NGC 2808 and M4, two Galactic globular clusters which show different patterns in the Na-O and Mg-Al anticorrelation and have different helium distributions. We find that the amount of pristine gas involved in the formation of SG stars is a key parameter to fit the observed O-Na and Mg-Al patterns. The helium distribution function for these models is in general good agreement with the observed one. Our models, by shedding light on the role of different parameters and their interplay in determining the final SG chemical properties, illustrate the basic ingredients, constraints and problems encountered in this self-enrichment scenario which must be addressed by more sophisticated chemical and hydrodynamic simulations.
  • Spectroscopic and photometric observations show that many globular clusters host multiple stellar populations, challenging the common paradigm that globular clusters are "simple stellar populations" composed of stars of uniform age and chemical composition. The chemical abundances of second-generation (SG) stars constrain the sources of gas out of which these stars must have formed, indicating that the gas must contain matter processed through the high-temperature CNO cycle. First-generation massive Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars have been proposed as the source of this gas. In a previous study, by means of hydrodynamical and N-body simulations, we have shown that the AGB ejecta collect in a cooling flow in the cluster core, where the gas reaches high densities, ultimately forming a centrally concentrated subsystem of SG stars. In this Letter we show that the high gas density can also lead to significant accretion onto a pre-existing seed black hole. We show that gas accretion can increase the black hole mass by up to a factor of 100. The details of the gas dynamics are important in determining the actual black hole growth. Assuming a near-universal seed black hole mass and small cluster-to-cluster variations in the duration of the SG formation phase, the outcome of our scenario is one in which the present intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) mass may have only a weak dependence on the current cluster properties. The scenario presented provides a natural mechanism for the formation of an IMBH at the cluster center during the SG star-formation phase.
  • Core helium burning is the dominant source of energy of extreme horizontal branch stars, as the hydrogen envelope is too small to contribute to the nuclear energy output. The evolution of each mass in the HR diagram occurs along vertical tracks that, when the core helium is consumed, evolve to higher Teff and then to the white dwarf stage. The larger is the mass, the smaller is the Teff of the models, so that the zero age horizontal branch (ZAHB) is "horizontal". In this paper we show that, if the helium mass fraction (Y) of the envelope is larger than Y~0.5, the shape of the tracks changes completely: the hydrogen burning becomes efficient again also for very small envelope masses, thanks to the higher molecular weight and to the higher temperatures of the hydrogen shell. The larger is Y, the smaller is the envelope mass that provides strong H-shell burning. These tracks have a curled shape, are located at a Teff following the approximate relation Teff=8090+ 32900xY, and become more luminous for larger envelope masses. Consequently, the ZAHB of the very high helium models is "vertical" in the HR diagram. Synthetic models based on these tracks nicely reproduce the location and shape of the "blue hook" in the globular cluster wCen, best fit by a very high Teff (bluer) sequence with Y=0.80 and a cooler (redder) one with Y=0.65. Although these precise values of Y may depend on the color-Teff conversions, we know that the helium content of the progenitors of the blue hook stars can not be larger than Y~0.38-0.40, if they are descendants of the cluster blue main sequence. Consequently, this interpretation implies that all these objects must in fact be progeny of the blue main sequence, but they have all suffered further deep mixing, that has largely and uniformly increased their surface helium abundance, during the red giant branch evolution. A late helium flash can not be the cause of this deep mixing, as the models we propose have hydrogen rich envelopes much more massive than those required for a late flash. We discuss different models of deep mixing proposed in the literature, and conclude that our interpretation of the blue hook can not be ruled out, but requires a much deeper investigation before it can be accepted.
  • Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819 -- one of four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation and the frequency of maximum oscillation power. We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster-membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about two orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.
  • Lithium is made up in the envelopes of massive Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars through the process of Hot Bottom Burning. In Globular Clusters, this processing is one possible source of the hot-CNO burning whose nuclear products are then ejected into the intracluster medium and take part in the formation of a second stellar generation, explaining the peculiar distribution of chemical elements among the cluster stars. We discuss the lithium yields from AGB stars in the mass range 3-6.3 Msun, and from super-AGB stars of masses in the range 6.5-9 Msun for metallicity Z=0.001. The qualitative behaviour of these yields is discussed in terms of the physical structure of the different masses. Although many uncertainties affect the other yields of these stars (e.g. O, Na and Mg), even larger uncertainties affect the lithium yield, as it depends dramatically on the adopted description of mass loss. When we adopt our standard mass loss formulation, very large yields are obtained especially for the super-AGB stars, and we discuss their possible role on the lithium abundance of second generation stars in globular clusters.
  • Context: We present the physical and chemical properties of intermediate-mass stars models of low metallicity, evolved along the thermal pulse phase. Aims: The target of this work is to extend to low metallicities, Z=1,2 and 6 x 10^{-4}, the models previously computed for chemistries typical of Globular Clusters of an intermediate metallicity (Z=0.001), and for the most metal-rich clusters found in our Galaxy (Z=0.004); the main goal is to test the self-enrichment scenario also for metal poor Globular Clusters Methods: We calculated three grids of intermediate-mass models with metallicities Z=10^{-4}, 2x10^{-4}, and 6x10^{-4}; the evolutionary sequences are followed from the pre-main sequence throughout the AGB phase, almost until the ejection of the whole envelope. We discuss the chemistry of the ejecta, and in particular the mass fractions of those elements that have been investigated during the many, deep, spectrocopic surveys of Globular Clusters Results: Although the data for oxygen and sodium are scarce for low metallicity Globular Clusters, the few data for the unevolved stars in NGC6397 are compatible with the models. Further, we find good agreement with the C--N anticorrelation of unevolved stars in the cluster M15. In this cluster, however, no stars having low oxygen ([O/Fe] = -1) have been detected. The most massive, very metal poor clusters, should contain such stars, according to the present models. At the lowest metallicity Z=10^{-4}, the ejecta of the most massive AGBs have C/O>1, due to the dramatic decrease of the oxygen abundance. We discuss the possible implications of this prediction.
  • Some globular clusters are observed to host a population of second generation (SG) stars which show chemical anomalies and must have formed from gas containing matter processed in the envelopes of first generation (FG) cluster stars. We study the SG formation process by means of 1D hydrodynamical simulations, assuming that the SG is formed by the gas ejected by AGB stars. This gas collects in a cooling flow into the cluster core, where it forms a SG star subsystem strongly concentrated in the cluster innermost regions with structural properties largely independent of the FG initial properties. We also present the results of a model in which pristine gas contributes to the SG formation. In this model a very helium-rich SG population and one with a moderate helium enrichment form; the resulting SG bimodal helium distribution resembles that observed for SG stars in NGC 2808. By means of N-body simulations, we study the two-population cluster dynamical evolution. In our simulations, a large fraction of FG stars are lost early in the cluster evolution due to the expansion and stripping of the cluster outer layers resulting from early mass loss associated with FG SN ejecta. The SG population is largely unscathed by this early mass loss, and this early evolution leads to values of the SG to FG number ratio consistent with observations. We also demonstrate possible evolutionary routes leading to the loss of most of the FG population, leaving an SG-dominated cluster. Until mixing of the two populations is complete, the radial profile of the SG to FG number ratio is characterized by a flat inner part and a declining portion in the outer cluster regions. (abridged)
  • We present stellar yields computed from detailed models of intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch stars of low metallicity. In this work, the whole main microphysics inputs have been updated, and in particular alpha-enhancement is explicitly taken into account both in the opacities and equation of state. The target of this work is to provide a basis to test the reliability of the AGB self-enrichment scenario for Globular Clusters of intermediate metallicity. These Globular Clusters exhibit well defined abundance patterns, which have often been interpreted as a consequence of the pollution of the interstellar medium by the ejecta of massive AGBs. We calculated a grid of intermediate mass models with metallicity Z=0.001; the evolutionary sequences are followed from the pre-Main sequence along the whole AGB phase. We focus our attention on those elements largely studied in the spectroscopic investigations of Globular Clusters stars, i.e. oxygen, sodium, aluminum, magnesium and fluorine.} The predictions of our models show an encouraging agreement with the demand of the self-enrichment scenario for what concerns the abundances of oxygen, aluminum, fluorine and magnesium. The question of sodium is more tricky, due to the large uncertainties of the cross-sections of the Ne-Na cycle. The present results show that only a relatively small range of initial masses (M=5,6 solar masses) can be responsible for the self enrichment.
  • There is a growing evidence that several globular clusters must contain multiple stellar generations, differing in helium content. This hypothesis has helped to interpret peculiar unexplained features in their horizontal branches. In this framework we model the peaked distribution of the RR Lyr periods in M3, that has defied explanation until now. At the same time, we try to reproduce the colour distribution of M3 horizontal branch stars. We find that only a very small dispersion in mass loss along the red giant branch reproduces with good accuracy the observational data. The enhanced and variable helium content among cluster stars is at the origin of the extension in colour of the horizontal branch, while the sharply peaked mass loss is necessary to reproduce the sharply peaked period distribution of RR Lyr variables. The dispersion in mass loss has to be <~ 0.003 Msun, to be compared with the usually assumed values of ~0.02 Msun. This requirement represents a substantial change in the interpretation of the physical mechanisms regulating the evolution of globular cluster stars.