• LaSalle invariance principle was originally proposed in the 1950's and has become a fundamental mathematical tool in the area of dynamical systems and control. In both theoretical research and engineering practice, discrete-time dynamical systems have been at least as extensively studied as continuous-time systems. For example, model predictive control is typically studied in discrete-time via Lyapunov methods. However, there is a peculiar absence in the standard literature of standard treatments of Lyapunov functions and LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time nonlinear systems. Most of the textbooks on nonlinear dynamical systems focus only on continuous-time systems. In Chapter 1 of the book by LaSalle [11], the author establishes the LaSalle invariance principle for difference equation systems. However, all the useful lemmas in [11] are given in the form of exercises with no proof provided. In this document, we provide the proofs of all the lemmas proposed in [11] that are needed to derive the main theorem on the LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time dynamical systems. We organize all the materials in a self-contained manner. We first introduce some basic concepts and definitions in Section 1, such as dynamical systems, invariant sets, and limit sets. In Section 2 we present and prove some useful lemmas on the properties of invariant sets and limit sets. Finally, we establish the original LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time dynamical systems and a simple extension in Section~3. In Section 4, we provide some references on extensions of LaSalle invariance principles for further reading. This document is intended for educational and tutorial purposes and contains lemmas that might be useful as a reference for researchers.
  • This paper studies linear stochastic approximation (SA) algorithms and their application to multi-agent systems in engineering and sociology. As main contribution, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for convergence of linear SA algorithms to a deterministic or random final vector. We also characterize the system convergence rate, when the system is convergent. Moreover, differing from non-negative gain functions in traditional SA algorithms, this paper considers also the case when the gain functions are allowed to take arbitrary real numbers. Using our general treatment, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions to reach consensus and group consensus for first-order discrete-time multi-agent system over random signed networks and with state-dependent noise. Finally, we extend our results to the setting of multi-dimensional linear SA algorithms and characterize the behavior of the multi-dimensional Friedkin-Johnsen model over random interaction networks.
  • Synchronization in the networks of coupled oscillators is a widely studied topic in different areas. It is well-known that synchronization occurs if the connectivity of the network dominates heterogeneity of the oscillators. Despite the extensive study on this topic, the quest for sharp closed-form synchronization tests is still in vain. In this paper, we present an algorithm for finding the Taylor expansion of the inverse Kuramoto map. We show that this Taylor series can be used to obtain a hierarchy of increasingly accurate approximate tests with low computational complexity. These approximate tests are then used to estimate the threshold of synchronization as well as the position of the synchronization manifold of the network.
  • This paper studies the problem of maximizing the return time entropy generated by a Markov chain subject to a given graph structure and a prescribed stationary distribution. The return time entropy is defined to be the weighted sum of the entropy of the first return time for the states in the Markov chains. The objective function in our optimization problem is a function series and does not have a closed form in general. First, we show that this problem is well-posed, i.e., the objective function is continuous over a compact set and there exists at least one optimal solution. Then, we analyze two special cases when the objective functions have closed-form expressions. Third, we obtain an upper bound for the return time entropy and solve analytically for the case when the given graph is a complete graph. Fourth, we establish the connections between the return time entropy and the well-known entropy rate of Markov chains. We also approximate the problem by truncating the objective function and propose a gradient projection based method to solve it. The results derived in this paper are relevant to the design of stochastic surveillance strategies in robotic surveillance problems.
  • A decomposition-based coverage control scheme is proposed for multi-agent, persistent surveillance missions operating in a communication-constrained, dynamic environment. The proposed approach decouples high-level task assignment from low-level motion planning in a modular framework. Coverage assignments and surveillance parameters are managed by a central base station, and transmitted to mobile agents via unplanned and asynchronous exchanges. Coverage updates promote load balancing, while maintaining geometric and temporal characteristics that allow effective pairing with generic path planners. Namely, the proposed scheme guarantees that (i) coverage regions are connected and collectively cover the environment, (ii) subregions may only go uncovered for bounded periods of time, (iii) collisions (or sensing overlaps) are inherently avoided, and (iv) under static event likelihoods, the collective coverage regions converge to a Pareto-optimal configuration. This management scheme is then paired with a generic path planner satisfying loose assumptions. The scheme is illustrated through simulated surveillance missions.
  • In this work we review a class of deterministic nonlinear models for the propagation of infectious diseases over contact networks with strongly-connected topologies. We consider network models for susceptible-infected (SI), susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS), and susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) settings. In each setting, we provide a comprehensive nonlinear analysis of equilibria, stability properties, convergence, monotonicity, positivity, and threshold conditions. For the network SI setting, specific contributions include establishing its equilibria, stability, and positivity properties. For the network SIS setting, we review a well-known deterministic model, provide novel results on the computation and characterization of the endemic state (when the system is above the epidemic threshold), and present alternative proofs for some of its properties. Finally, for the network SIR setting, we propose novel results for transient behavior, threshold conditions, stability properties, and asymptotic convergence. These results are analogous to those well-known for the scalar case. In addition, we provide a novel iterative algorithm to compute the asymptotic state of the network SIR system.
  • This paper proposes models of learning process in teams of individuals who collectively execute a sequence of tasks and whose actions are determined by individual skill levels and networks of interpersonal appraisals and influence. The closely-related proposed models have increasing complexity, starting with a centralized manager-based assignment and learning model, and finishing with a social model of interpersonal appraisal, assignments, learning, and influences. We show how rational optimal behavior arises along the task sequence for each model, and discuss conditions of suboptimality. Our models are grounded in replicator dynamics from evolutionary games, influence networks from mathematical sociology, and transactive memory systems from organization science.
  • In this paper we propose a class of propagation models for multiple competing products over a social network. We consider two propagation mechanisms: social conversion and self conversion, corresponding, respectively, to endogenous and exogenous factors. A novel concept, the product-conversion graph, is proposed to characterize the interplay among competing products. According to the chronological order of social and self conversions, we develop two Markov-chain models and, based on the independence approximation, we approximate them with two respective difference equations systems. Theoretical analysis on these two approximation models reveals the dependency of the systems' asymptotic behavior on the structures of both the product-conversion graph and the social network, as well as the initial condition. In addition to the theoretical work, accuracy of the independence approximation and the asymptotic behavior of the Markov-chain model are investigated via numerical analysis, for the case where social conversion occurs before self conversion. Finally, we propose a class of multi-player and multi-stage competitive propagation games and discuss the seeding-quality trade-off, as well as the allocation of seeding resources among the individuals. We investigate the unique Nash equilibrium at each stage and analyze the system's behavior when every player is adopting the policy at the Nash equilibrium.
  • The assessment of voltage stability margins is a promising direction for wide-area monitoring systems. Accurate monitoring architectures for long-term voltage instability are typically centralized and lack scalability, while completely decentralized approaches relying on local measurements tend towards inaccuracy. Here we present distributed linear algorithms for the online computation of voltage collapse sensitivity indices. The computations are collectively performed by processors embedded at each bus in the smart grid, using synchronized phasor measurements and communication of voltage phasors between neighboring buses. Our algorithms provably converge to the proper index values, as would be calculated using centralized information, but but do not require any central decision maker for coordination. Modifications of the algorithms to account for generator reactive power limits are discussed. We illustrate the effectiveness of our designs with a case study of the New England 39 bus system.
  • A standard operational requirement in power systems is that the voltage magnitudes lie within prespecified bounds. Conventional engineering wisdom suggests that such a tightly-regulated profile, imposed for system design purposes and good operation of the network, should also guarantee a secure system, operating far from static bifurcation instabilities such as voltage collapse. In general however, these two objectives are distinct and must be separately enforced. We formulate an optimization problem which maximizes the distance to voltage collapse through injections of reactive power, subject to power flow and operational voltage constraints. By exploiting a linear approximation of the power flow equations we arrive at a convex reformulation which can be efficiently solved for the optimal injections. We also address the planning problem of allocating the resources by recasting our problem in a sparsity-promoting framework that allows us to choose a desired trade-off between optimality of injections and the number of required actuators. Finally, we present a distributed algorithm to solve the optimization problem, showing that it can be implemented on-line as a feedback controller. We illustrate the performance of our results with the IEEE30 bus network.
  • We consider the problem of voltage stability and reactive power balancing in islanded small-scale electrical networks outfitted with DC/AC inverters ("microgrids"). A droop-like voltage feedback controller is proposed which is quadratic in the local voltage magnitude, allowing for the application of circuit-theoretic analysis techniques to the closed-loop system. The operating points of the closed-loop microgrid are in exact correspondence with the solutions of a reduced power flow equation, and we provide explicit solutions and small-signal stability analyses under several static and dynamic load models. Controller optimality is characterized as follows: we show a one-to-one correspondence between the high-voltage equilibrium of the microgrid under quadratic droop control, and the solution of an optimization problem which minimizes a trade-off between reactive power dissipation and voltage deviations. Power sharing performance of the controller is characterized as a function of the controller gains, network topology, and parameters. Perhaps surprisingly, proportional sharing of the total load between inverters is achieved in the low-gain limit, independent of the circuit topology or reactances. All results hold for arbitrary grid topologies, with arbitrary numbers of inverters and loads. Numerical results confirm the robustness of the controller to unmodeled dynamics.
  • In this work we present new distributed controllers for secondary frequency and voltage control in islanded microgrids. Inspired by techniques from cooperative control, the proposed controllers use localized information and nearest-neighbor communication to collectively perform secondary control actions. The frequency controller rapidly regulates the microgrid frequency to its nominal value while maintaining active power sharing among the distributed generators. Tuning of the voltage controller provides a simple and intuitive trade-off between the conflicting goals of voltage regulation and reactive power sharing. Our designs require no knowledge of the microgrid topology, impedances or loads. The distributed architecture allows for flexibility and redundancy, and eliminates the need for a central microgrid controller. We provide a voltage stability analysis and present extensive experimental results validating our designs, verifying robust performance under communication failure and during plug-and-play operation.
  • This brief examines the behavior of DC circuits comprised of resistively interconnected constant power devices, as may arise in DC microgrids containing micro-sources and constant power loads. We derive a sufficient condition for all operating points of the circuit to lie in a desirable set, where the average nodal voltage level is high and nodal voltages are tightly clustered near one another. Our condition has the elegant physical interpretation that the ratio of resistive losses to total injected power should be small compared to a measure of network heterogeneity, as quantified by a ratio of conductance matrix eigenvalues. Perhaps surprisingly, the interplay between the circuit topology, branch conductances and the constant power devices implicitly defines a nominal voltage level for the circuit, despite the explicit absence of voltage-regulated nodes.
  • Modeled after the hierarchical control architecture of power transmission systems, a layering of primary, secondary, and tertiary control has become the standard operation paradigm for islanded microgrids. Despite this superficial similarity, the control objectives in microgrids across these three layers are varied and ambitious, and they must be achieved while allowing for robust plug-and-play operation and maximal flexibility, without hierarchical decision making and time-scale separations. In this work, we explore control strategies for these three layers and illuminate some possibly-unexpected connections and dependencies among them. Building from a first-principle analysis of decentralized primary droop control, we study centralized, decentralized, and distributed architectures for secondary frequency regulation. We find that averaging-based distributed controllers using communication among the generation units offer the best combination of flexibility and performance. We further leverage these results to study constrained AC economic dispatch in a tertiary control layer. Surprisingly, we show that the minimizers of the economic dispatch problem are in one-to-one correspondence with the set of steady-states reachable by droop control. In other words, the adoption of droop control is necessary and sufficient to achieve economic optimization. This equivalence results in simple guidelines to select the droop coefficients, which include the known criteria for power sharing. We illustrate the performance and robustness of our designs through simulations.
  • This paper studies the problem of controlling complex networks, that is, the joint problem of selecting a set of control nodes and of designing a control input to steer a network to a target state. For this problem (i) we propose a metric to quantify the difficulty of the control problem as a function of the required control energy, (ii) we derive bounds based on the system dynamics (network topology and weights) to characterize the tradeoff between the control energy and the number of control nodes, and (iii) we propose an open-loop control strategy with performance guarantees. In our strategy we select control nodes by relying on network partitioning, and we design the control input by leveraging optimal and distributed control techniques. Our findings show several control limitations and properties. For instance, for Schur stable and symmetric networks: (i) if the number of control nodes is constant, then the control energy increases exponentially with the number of network nodes, (ii) if the number of control nodes is a fixed fraction of the network nodes, then certain networks can be controlled with constant energy independently of the network dimension, and (iii) clustered networks may be easier to control because, for sufficiently many control nodes, the control energy depends only on the controllability properties of the clusters and on their coupling strength. We validate our results with examples from power networks, social networks, and epidemics spreading.
  • We study the mixed human-robot team design in a system theoretic setting using the context of a surveillance mission. The three key coupled components of a mixed team design are (i) policies for the human operator, (ii) policies to account for erroneous human decisions, and (iii) policies to control the automaton. In this paper, we survey elements of human decision-making, including evidence aggregation, situational awareness, fatigue, and memory effects. We bring together the models for these elements in human decision-making to develop a single coherent model for human decision-making in a two-alternative choice task. We utilize the developed model to design efficient attention allocation policies for the human operator. We propose an anomaly detection algorithm that utilizes potentially erroneous decision by the operator to ascertain an anomalous region among the set of regions surveilled. Finally, we propose a stochastic vehicle routing policy that surveils an anomalous region with high probability. Our mixed team design relies on the certainty-equivalent receding-horizon control framework.
  • Inter-area oscillations in bulk power systems are typically poorly controllable by means of local decentralized control. Recent research efforts have been aimed at developing wide- area control strategies that involve communication of remote signals. In conventional wide-area control, the control structure is fixed a priori typically based on modal criteria. In contrast, here we employ the recently-introduced paradigm of sparsity- promoting optimal control to simultaneously identify the optimal control structure and optimize the closed-loop performance. To induce a sparse control architecture, we regularize the standard quadratic performance index with an l1-penalty on the feedback matrix. The quadratic objective functions are inspired by the classic slow coherency theory and are aimed at imitating homogeneous networks without inter-area oscillations. We use the New England power grid model to demonstrate that the proposed combination of the sparsity-promoting control design with the slow coherency objectives performs almost as well as the optimal centralized control while only making use of a single wide-area communication link. In addition to this nominal performance, we also demonstrate that our control strategy yields favorable robustness margins and that it can be used to identify a sparse control architecture for control design via alternative means.
  • Motivated by the recent and growing interest in smart grid technology, we study the operation of DC/AC inverters in an inductive microgrid. We show that a network of loads and DC/AC inverters equipped with power-frequency droop controllers can be cast as a Kuramoto model of phase-coupled oscillators. This novel description, together with results from the theory of coupled oscillators, allows us to characterize the behavior of the network of inverters and loads. Specifically, we provide a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a synchronized solution that is unique and locally exponentially stable. We present a selection of controller gains leading to a desirable sharing of power among the inverters, and specify the set of loads which can be serviced without violating given actuation constraints. Moreover, we propose a distributed integral controller based on averaging algorithms which dynamically regulates the system frequency in the presence of a time-varying load. Remarkably, this distributed-averaging integral controller has the additional property that it maintains the power sharing properties of the primary droop controller. Our results hold without assumptions on identical line characteristics or voltage magnitudes.
  • This work studies consensus strategies for networks of agents with limited memory, computation, and communication capabilities. We assume that agents can process only values from a finite alphabet, and we adopt the framework of finite fields, where the alphabet consists of the integers {0,...,p-1}, for some prime number p, and operations are performed modulo p. Thus, we define a new class of consensus dynamics, which can be exploited in certain applications such as pose estimation in capacity and memory constrained sensor networks. For consensus networks over finite fields, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions on the network topology and weights to ensure convergence. We show that consensus networks over finite fields converge in finite time, a feature that can be hardly achieved over the field of real numbers. For the design of finite-field consensus networks, we propose a general design method, with high computational complexity, and a network composition rule to generate large consensus networks from smaller components. Finally, we discuss the application of finite-field consensus networks to distributed averaging and pose estimation in sensor networks.
  • We design persistent surveillance strategies for the quickest detection of anomalies taking place in an environment of interest. From a set of predefined regions in the environment, a team of autonomous vehicles collects noisy observations, which a control center processes. The overall objective is to minimize detection delay while maintaining the false alarm rate below a desired threshold. We present joint (i) anomaly detection algorithms for the control center and (ii) vehicle routing policies. For the control center, we propose parallel cumulative sum (CUSUM) algorithms (one for each region) to detect anomalies from noisy observations. For the vehicles, we propose a stochastic routing policy, in which the regions to be visited are chosen according to a probability vector. We study stationary routing policy (the probability vector is constant) as well as adaptive routing policies (the probability vector varies in time as a function of the likelihood of regional anomalies). In the context of stationary policies, we design a performance metric and minimize it to design an efficient stationary routing policy. Our adaptive policy improves upon the stationary counterpart by adaptively increasing the selection probability of regions with high likelihood of anomaly. Finally, we show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms through numerical simulations and a persistent surveillance experiment.
  • The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a pervasive topic in various scientific disciplines ranging from biology, physics, and chemistry to social networks and engineering applications. A coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous oscillators and a graph describing the interaction among the oscillators. These two ingredients give rise to a rich dynamic behavior that keeps on fascinating the scientific community. In this article, we present a tutorial introduction to coupled oscillator networks, we review the vast literature on theory and applications, and we present a collection of different synchronization notions, conditions, and analysis approaches. We focus on the canonical phase oscillator models occurring in countless real-world synchronization phenomena, and present their rich phenomenology. We review a set of applications relevant to control scientists. We explore different approaches to phase and frequency synchronization, and we present a collection of synchronization conditions and performance estimates. For all results we present self-contained proofs that illustrate a sample of different analysis methods in a tutorial style.
  • The emergence of synchronization in a network of coupled oscillators is a fascinating topic in various scientific disciplines. A coupled oscillator network is characterized by a population of heterogeneous oscillators and a graph describing the interaction among them. It is known that a strongly coupled and sufficiently homogeneous network synchronizes, but the exact threshold from incoherence to synchrony is unknown. Here we present a novel, concise, and closed-form condition for synchronization of the fully nonlinear, non-equilibrium, and dynamic network. Our synchronization condition can be stated elegantly in terms of the network topology and parameters, or equivalently in terms of an intuitive, linear, and static auxiliary system. Our results significantly improve upon the existing conditions advocated thus far, they are provably exact for various interesting network topologies and parameters, they are statistically correct for almost all networks, and they can be applied equally to synchronization phenomena arising in physics and biology as well as in engineered oscillator networks such as electric power networks. We illustrate the validity, the accuracy, and the practical applicability of our results in complex networks scenarios and in smart grid applications.
  • This paper discusses distributed approaches for the solution of random convex programs (RCP). RCPs are convex optimization problems with a (usually large) number N of randomly extracted constraints; they arise in several applicative areas, especially in the context of decision under uncertainty, see [2],[3]. We here consider a setup in which instances of the random constraints (the scenario) are not held by a single centralized processing unit, but are distributed among different nodes of a network. Each node "sees" only a small subset of the constraints, and may communicate with neighbors. The objective is to make all nodes converge to the same solution as the centralized RCP problem. To this end, we develop two distributed algorithms that are variants of the constraints consensus algorithm [4],[5]: the active constraints consensus (ACC) algorithm, and the vertex constraints consensus (VCC) algorithm. We show that the ACC algorithm computes the overall optimal solution in finite time, and with almost surely bounded communication at each iteration. The VCC algorithm is instead tailored for the special case in which the constraint functions are convex also w.r.t. the uncertain parameters, and it computes the solution in a number of iterations bounded by the diameter of the communication graph. We further devise a variant of the VCC algorithm, namely quantized vertex constraints consensus (qVCC), to cope with the case in which communication bandwidth among processors is bounded. We discuss several applications of the proposed distributed techniques, including estimation, classification, and random model predictive control, and we present a numerical analysis of the performance of the proposed methods. As a complementary numerical result, we show that the parallel computation of the scenario solution using ACC algorithm significantly outperforms its centralized equivalent.
  • The formation of opinions in a large population is governed by endogenous (human interactions) and exogenous (media influence) factors. In the analysis of opinion evolution in a large population, decision making rules can be approximated with non-Bayesian "rule of thumb" methods. This paper focuses on an Eulerian bounded-confidence model of opinion dynamics with a potential time-varying input. First, we prove some properties of this system's dynamics with time-varying input. Second, we derive a simple sufficient condition for opinion consensus, and prove the convergence of the population's distribution with no input to a sum of Dirac Delta functions. Finally, we define an input's attraction range, and for a normally distributed input and uniformly distributed initial population, we conjecture that the length of attraction range is an increasing affine function of population's confidence bound and input's variance.
  • Cyber-physical systems integrate computation, communication, and physical capabilities to interact with the physical world and humans. Besides failures of components, cyber-physical systems are prone to malignant attacks, and specific analysis tools as well as monitoring mechanisms need to be developed to enforce system security and reliability. This paper proposes a unified framework to analyze the resilience of cyber-physical systems against attacks cast by an omniscient adversary. We model cyber-physical systems as linear descriptor systems, and attacks as exogenous unknown inputs. Despite its simplicity, our model captures various real-world cyber-physical systems, and it includes and generalizes many prototypical attacks, including stealth, (dynamic) false-data injection and replay attacks. First, we characterize fundamental limitations of static, dynamic, and active monitors for attack detection and identification. Second, we provide constructive algebraic conditions to cast undetectable and unidentifiable attacks. Third, by using the system interconnection structure, we describe graph-theoretic conditions for the existence of undetectable and unidentifiable attacks. Finally, we validate our findings through some illustrative examples with different cyber-physical systems, such as a municipal water supply network and two electrical power grids.