• We present a detailed analysis of the stacked frequency spectrum of a large sample of galaxy clusters using Planck data, together with auxiliary data from the AKARI and IRAS missions. Our primary goal is to search for the imprint of relativistic corrections to the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (tSZ) spectrum, which allow to measure the temperature of the intracluster medium. We remove Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds with a matched filtering technique, which is validated using simulations with realistic mock data sets. The extracted spectra show the tSZ signal at high significance and reveal an additional far-infrared (FIR) excess, which we attribute to thermal emission from the galaxy clusters themselves. This excess FIR emission from clusters is accounted for in our spectral model. We are able to measure the tSZ relativistic corrections at $2.2\sigma$ by constraining the mean temperature of our cluster sample to $4.4^{+2.1}_{-2.0} \, \mathrm{keV}$. We repeat the same analysis on a subsample containing only the 100 hottest clusters, for which we measure the mean temperature to be $6.0^{+3.8}_{-2.9} \, \mathrm{keV}$, corresponding to $2.0\sigma$. The temperature of the emitting dust grains in our FIR model is constrained to $\simeq 20 \, \mathrm{K}$, consistent with previous studies. Control for systematic biases is done by fitting mock clusters, from which we also show that using the non-relativistic spectrum for SZ signal extraction will lead to a bias in the integrated Compton parameter $Y$, which can be up to 14% for the most massive clusters. We conclude by providing an outlook for the upcoming CCAT-prime telescope, which will improve upon Planck with lower noise and better spatial resolution.
  • We present a survey of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m line and underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission in a sample of 27 z>6 quasars using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at ~1" resolution. The [CII] line was significantly detected (at >5-sigma) in 23 sources (85%). We find typical line luminosities of $L_{\rm [CII]}=10^{9-10}$ L$_\odot$, and an average line width of ~385 km/s. The [CII]-to-far-infrared luminosity ratio ([CII]/FIR) in our sources span one order of magnitude, highlighting a variety of conditions in the star-forming medium. Four quasar host galaxies are clearly resolved in their [CII] emission on a few kpc scales. Basic estimates of the dynamical masses of the host galaxies give masses between $2\times10^{10}$ and $2\times10^{11}$ M$_\odot$, i.e., more than an order of magnitude below what is expected from local scaling relations, given the available limits on the masses of the central black holes ($>3\times10^8$ M$_\odot$, assuming Eddington-limited accretion). In stacked ALMA [CII] spectra of individual sources in our sample, we find no evidence of a deviation from a single Gaussian profile. The quasar luminosity does not strongly correlate with either the [CII] luminosity or equivalent width. This survey (with typical on-source integration times of 8 min) showcases the unparalleled sensitivity of ALMA at millimeter wavelengths, and offers a unique reference sample for the study of the first massive galaxies in the universe.
  • We carried out targeted ALMA observations of 129 fields in the COSMOS region at 1.25 mm, detecting 152 galaxies at S/N$\geq$5 with an average continuum RMS of 150 $\mu$Jy. These fields represent a S/N-limited sample of AzTEC / ASTE sources with 1.1 mm S/N$\geq$4 over an area of 0.72 square degrees. Given ALMA's fine resolution and the exceptional spectroscopic and multiwavelength photometric data available in COSMOS, this survey allows us unprecedented power in identifying submillimeter galaxy counterparts and determining their redshifts through spectroscopic or photometric means. In addition to 30 sources with prior spectroscopic redshifts, we identified redshifts for 113 galaxies through photometric methods and an additional nine sources with lower limits, which allowed a statistically robust determination of the redshift distribution. We have resolved 33 AzTEC sources into multi-component systems and our redshifts suggest that nine are likely to be physically associated. Our overall redshift distribution peaks at $z\sim$2.0 with a high redshift tail skewing the median redshift to $\tilde{z}$=2.48$\pm$0.05. We find that brighter millimeter sources are preferentially found at higher redshifts. Our faintest sources, with S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$<1.25 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=2.18$\pm$0.09, while the brightest sources, S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$>1.8 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=3.08$\pm$0.17. After accounting for spectral energy distribution shape and selection effects these results are consistent with several previous submillimeter galaxy surveys, and moreover, support the conclusion that the submillimeter galaxy redshift distribution is sensitive to survey depth.
  • We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the dust continuum and [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line emission towards a far-infrared-luminous quasar, ULAS J131911.29$+$095051.4 at $z=6.13$, and combine the new Cycle 1 data with ALMA Cycle 0 data. The combined data have an angular resolution $\sim$ $0.3$, and resolve both the dust continuum and the [C II] line emission on few kpc scales. The [C II] line emission is more irregular than the dust continuum emission which suggests different distributions between the dust and [C II]-emitting gas. The combined data confirm the [C II] velocity gradient that we previously detected in lower resolution ALMA image from Cycle 0 data alone. We apply a tilted ring model to the [C II] velocity map to obtain a rotation curve, and constrain the circular velocity to be 427 $\pm$ 55 km s$^{-1}$ at a radius of 3.2 kpc with an inclination angle of 34$^\circ$. We measure the dynamical mass within the 3.2 kpc region to be 13.4$_{-5.3}^{+7.8}$ $\times 10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$. This yields a black hole and host galaxy mass ratio of 0.020$_{-0.007}^{+0.013}$, which is about 4$_{-2}^{+3}$ times higher than the present-day $M_{\rm BH}$/$M_{\rm bulge}$ ratio. This suggests that the supermassive black hole grows the bulk of its mass before the formation of the most of stellar mass in this quasar host galaxy in the early universe.
  • We determine the physical properties of a sample of SMGs in the COSMOS field that were pre-selected at the observed wavelength of $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.1$ mm, and followed up at $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.3$ mm with ALMA. We used MAGPHYS to fit the panchromatic (ultraviolet to radio) SEDs of 124 of the target SMGs, 19.4% of which are spectroscopically confirmed. The SED analysis was complemented by estimating the gas masses of the SMGs by using the $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.3$ mm emission as a tracer of the molecular gas. The sample median and 16th-84th percentile ranges of the stellar masses, SFRs, dust temperatures, and dust and gas masses were derived to be $\log(M_{\star}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=11.09^{+0.41}_{-0.53}$, ${\rm SFR}=402^{+661}_{-233}$ ${\rm M}_{\odot}~{\rm yr}^{-1}$, $T_{\rm dust}=39.7^{+9.7}_{-7.4}$ K, $\log(M_{\rm dust}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=9.01^{+0.20}_{-0.31}$, and $\log(M_{\rm gas}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=11.34^{+0.20}_{-0.23}$, respectively. The median gas-to-dust ratio and gas fraction were found to be $120^{+73}_{-30}$ and $0.62^{+0.27}_{-0.23}$, respectively. We found that 57.3% of our SMGs populate the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies, while 41.9% of the sources lie above the MS by a factor of >3 (one source lies below the MS). The largest 3 GHz radio sizes are found among the MS sources. Those SMGs that appear irregular in the rest-frame UV are predominantly starbursts, while the MS SMGs are mostly disk-like. The larger radio-emitting sizes of the MS SMGs compared to starbursts is a likely indication of their more widespread, less intense star formation. The irregular UV morphologies of the starburst SMGs are likely to echo their merger nature. Our results suggest that the transition from high-$z$ SMGs to local ellipticals via compact, quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at $z \sim 2$ might not be universal, and the latter population might also descend from the so-called blue nuggets.
  • The existence of massive ($10^{11}$ solar masses) elliptical galaxies by redshift z~4 (when the Universe was 1.5 billion years old) necessitates the presence of galaxies with star-formation rates exceeding 100 solar masses per year at z>6 (corresponding to an age of the Universe of less than 1 billion years). Surveys have discovered hundreds of galaxies at these early cosmic epochs, but their star-formation rates are more than an order of magnitude lower. The only known galaxies with very high star-formation rates at z>6 are, with only one exception, the host galaxies of quasars, but these galaxies also host accreting supermassive (more than $10^9$ solar masses) black holes, which probably affect the properties of the galaxies. Here we report observations of an emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII] at a wavelength of 158 micrometres) in four galaxies at z>6 that are companions of quasars, with velocity offsets of less than 600 kilometers per second and linear offsets of less than 600 kiloparsecs. The discovery of these four galaxies was serendipitous; they are close to their companion quasars and appear bright in the far-infrared. On the basis of the [CII] measurements, we estimate star-formation rates in the companions of more than 100 solar masses per year. These sources are similar to the host galaxies of the quasars in [CII] brightness, linewidth and implied dynamical masses, but do not show evidence for accreting supermassive black holes. Similar systems have previously been found at lower redshift. We find such close companions in four out of twenty-five z>6 quasars surveyed, a fraction that needs to be accounted for in simulations. If they are representative of the bright end of the [CII] luminosity function, then they can account for the population of massive elliptical galaxies at z~4 in terms of cosmic space density.
  • We determine the radio size distribution of a large sample of 152 SMGs in COSMOS that were detected with ALMA at 1.3 mm. For this purpose, we used the observations taken by the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project. One hundred and fifteen of the 152 target SMGs were found to have a 3 GHz counterpart. The median value of the major axis FWHM at 3 GHz is derived to be $4.6\pm0.4$ kpc. The radio sizes show no evolutionary trend with redshift, or difference between different galaxy morphologies. We also derived the spectral indices between 1.4 and 3 GHz, and 3 GHz brightness temperatures for the sources, and the median values were found to be $\alpha=-0.67$ and $T_{\rm B}=12.6\pm2$ K. Three of the target SMGs, which are also detected with the VLBA, show clearly higher brightness temperatures than the typical values. Although the observed radio emission appears to be predominantly powered by star formation and supernova activity, our results provide a strong indication of the presence of an AGN in the VLBA and X-ray-detected SMG AzTEC/C61. The median radio-emitting size we have derived is 1.5-3 times larger than the typical FIR dust-emitting sizes of SMGs, but similar to that of the SMGs' molecular gas component traced through mid-$J$ line emission of CO. The physical conditions of SMGs probably render the diffusion of cosmic-ray electrons inefficient, and hence an unlikely process to lead to the observed extended radio sizes. Instead, our results point towards a scenario where SMGs are driven by galaxy interactions and mergers. Besides triggering vigorous starbursts, galaxy collisions can also pull out the magnetised fluids from the interacting disks, and give rise to a taffy-like synchrotron-emitting bridge. This provides an explanation for the spatially extended radio emission of SMGs, and can also cause a deviation from the well-known IR-radio correlation.
  • We report new IRAM/PdBI, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and VLA observations of the ultraluminous quasar SDSSJ010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter, J0100+2802) at z=6.3, which hosts the most massive supermassive black hole (SMBH) of 1.24x10^10 Msun known at z>6. We detect the [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line and molecular CO(6-5) line and continuum emission at 353 GHz, 260 GHz, and 3 GHz from this quasar. The CO(2-1) line and the underlying continuum at 32 GHz are also marginally detected. The [C II] and CO detections suggest active star formation and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxy. The redshift determined with the [C II] and CO lines shows a velocity offset of ~1000 km/s from that measured with the quasar Mg II line. The CO (2-1) line luminosity provides direct constraint on the molecular gas mass which is about (1.0+/-0.3)x10^10 Msun. We estimate the FIR luminosity to be (3.5+/-0.7)x10^12 Lsun, and the UV-to-FIR spectral energy distribution of J0100+2802 is consistent with the templates of the local optically luminous quasars. The derived [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratio of J0100+2802 is 0.0010+/-0.0002, which is slightly higher than the values of the most FIR luminous quasars at z~6. We investigate the constraint on the host galaxy dynamical mass of J0100+2802 based on the [C II] line spectrum. It is likely that this ultraluminous quasar lies above the local SMBH-galaxy mass relationship, unless we are viewing the system at a small inclination angle.
  • We present ALMA measurements of a merger shock using the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect signal, at the location of a radio relic in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster at $z \approx 0.9$. Multi-wavelength analysis in combination with the archival Chandra data and a high-resolution radio image provides a consistent picture of the thermal and non-thermal signal variation across the shock front and helps to put robust constraints on the shock Mach number as well as the relic magnetic field. We employ a Bayesian analysis technique for modeling the SZ and X-ray data self-consistently, illustrating respective parameter degeneracies. Combined results indicate a shock with Mach number ${\cal M} = 2.4^{+1.3}_{-0.6}$, which in turn suggests a high value of the magnetic field (of the order of $4-10 ~\mu$G) to account for the observed relic width at 2 GHz. At roughly half the current age of the universe, this is the highest-redshift direct detection of a cluster shock to date, and one of the first instances of an ALMA-SZ observation in a galaxy cluster. It shows the tremendous potential for future ALMA-SZ observations to detect merger shocks and other cluster substructures out to the highest redshifts.
  • Radio halos are diffuse synchrotron sources on scales of ~1 Mpc that are found in merging clusters of galaxies, and are believed to be powered by electrons re-accelerated by the merger-driven turbulence. We present measurements of extended radio emission on similarly large scales in two clusters of galaxies hosting cool cores: Abell 2390 and Abell 2261. The analysis is based on interferometric imaging with the JVLA, VLA and GMRT. We present detailed radio images of the targets, subtract the compact emission components, and measure the spectral indices for the diffuse components. The radio emission in A2390 extends beyond a known sloshing-like brightness discontinuity, and has a very steep in-band spectral slope at 1.5 GHz that is similar to some known ultra-steep spectrum radio halos. The diffuse signal in A2261 is more extended than in A2390 but has lower luminosity. X-ray morphological indicators, derived from XMM-Newton X-ray data, place these clusters in the category of relaxed or regular systems, although some asymmetric features that can indicate past minor mergers are seen in the X-ray brightness images. If these two Mpc-scale radio sources are categorized as giant radio halos, they question the common assumption of radio halos occurring exclusively in clusters undergoing violent merging activity, in addition to commonly used criteria in distinguishing between radio halos and mini-halos.
  • In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \sim 2$ to $z \sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation ($z\sim2$).
  • We study the molecular gas properties of high-$z$ galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets a $\sim1$ arcmin$^2$ region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3mm and 1mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities $L_{\rm{}IR}>10^{11}$ L$_\odot$, i.e. a detection in CO emission was expected. Out these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than typically found in starburst/SMG/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star-formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): The CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-$L_{\rm{}IR}$ envelope of the scatter in the $L_{\rm{}IR}-L'_{\rm{}CO}$ relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of $\sim$ 1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ($M_{\rm{}H2}$/$M_*$) is consistent with earlier measurements of main sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor $\sim$2-5$\times$ smaller than those based on CO. Accounting for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.
  • We make use of deep 1.2mm-continuum observations (12.7microJy/beam RMS) of a 1 arcmin^2 region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to probe dust-enshrouded star formation from 330 Lyman-break galaxies spanning the redshift range z=2-10 (to ~2-3 Msol/yr at 1sigma over the entire range). Given the depth and area of ASPECS, we would expect to tentatively detect 35 galaxies extrapolating the Meurer z~0 IRX-beta relation to z>~2 (assuming T_d~35 K). However, only 6 tentative detections are found at z>~2 in ASPECS, with just three at >3sigma. Subdividing z=2-10 galaxies according to stellar mass, UV luminosity, and UV-continuum slope and stacking the results, we only find a significant detection in the most massive (>10^9.75 Msol) subsample, with an infrared excess (IRX=L_{IR}/L_{UV}) consistent with previous z~2 results. However, the infrared excess we measure from our large selection of sub-L* (<10^9.75 Msol) galaxies is 0.11(-0.42)(+0.32) and 0.14(-0.14)(+0.15) at z=2-3 and z=4-10, respectively, lying below even an SMC IRX-beta relation (95% confidence). These results demonstrate the relevance of stellar mass for predicting the IR luminosity of z>~2 galaxies. We furthermore find that the evolution of the IRX-stellar mass relationship depends on the evolution of the dust temperature. If the dust temperature increases monotonically with redshift (as (1+z)^0.32) such that T_d~44-50 K at z>=4, current results are suggestive of little evolution in this relationship to z~6. We use these results to revisit recent estimates of the z>~3 SFR density. One less obvious implication is in interpreting the high Halpha EWs seen in z~5 galaxies: our results imply that star-forming galaxies produce Lyman-continuum photons at twice the efficiency (per unit UV luminosity) as implied in conventional models. Star-forming galaxies can then reionize the Universe, even if the escape fraction is <10%.
  • We present the rationale for and the observational description of ASPECS: The ALMA SPECtroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF), the cosmological deep field that has the deepest multi-wavelength data available. Our overarching goal is to obtain an unbiased census of molecular gas and dust continuum emission in high-redshift (z$>$0.5) galaxies. The $\sim$1$'$ region covered within the UDF was chosen to overlap with the deepest available imaging from HST. Our ALMA observations consist of full frequency scans in band 3 (84-115 GHz) and band 6 (212-272 GHz) at approximately uniform line sensitivity ($L'_{\rm CO}\sim$2$\times$10$^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$), and continuum noise levels of 3.8 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ and 12.7 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$, respectively. The molecular surveys cover the different rotational transitions of the CO molecule, leading to essentially full redshift coverage. The [CII] emission line is also covered at redshifts $6.0<z<8.0$. We present a customized algorithm to identify line candidates in the molecular line scans, and quantify our ability to recover artificial sources from our data. Based on whether multiple CO lines are detected, and whether optical spectroscopic redshifts as well as optical counterparts exist, we constrain the most likely line identification. We report 10 (11) CO line candidates in the 3mm (1mm) band, and our statistical analysis shows that $<$4 of these (in each band) are likely spurious. Less than 1/3 of the total CO flux in the low-J CO line candidates are from sources that are not associated with an optical/NIR counterpart. We also present continuum maps of both the band 3 and band 6 observations. The data presented here form the basis of a number of dedicated studies that are presented in subsequent papers.
  • In recent years there has been a paradigm shift from centralised to geographically distributed resources. Individual entities are no longer able to host or afford the necessary expertise in-house, and, as a consequence, society increasingly relies on widespread collaborations. Although such collaborations are now the norm for scientific projects, more technical structures providing support to a distributed scientific community without direct financial or other material benefits are scarce. The network of European ALMA Regional Centre (ARC) nodes is an example of such an internationally distributed user support network. It is an organised effort to provide the European ALMA user community with uniform expert support to enable optimal usage and scientific output of the ALMA facility. The network model for the European ARC nodes is described in terms of its organisation, communication strategies and user support.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the CO ($J = 2 \rightarrow 1$) line emission towards the $z = 6.419$ quasar SDSS J$114816.64+525150.3$ (J$1148+5251$). The molecular gas is found to be marginally resolved with a major axis of $0.9"$ (consistent with previous size measurements of the CO ($J = 7 \rightarrow 6$) emission). We observe tentative evidence for extended line emission towards the south west on a scale of ~$1.4"$, but this is only detected at $3.3\sigma$ significance and should be confirmed. The position of the molecular emission region is in excellent agreement with previous detections of low frequency radio continuum emission as well as [C ii] line and thermal dust continuum emission. These CO ($J = 2 \rightarrow 1$) observations provide an anchor for the low excitation part of the molecular line SED. We find no evidence for extended low excitation component, neither in the spectral line energy distribution nor the image. We fit a single kinetic gas temperature model of 50 K. We revisit the gas and dynamical masses in light of this new detection of a low order transition of CO, and confirm previous findings that there is no extended reservoir of cold molecular gas in J$1148+5251$, and that the source departs substantially from the low $z$ relationship between black hole mass and bulge mass. Hence, the characteristics of J$1148+5251$ at $z = 6.419$ are very similar to $z$~$2$ quasars, in the lack of a diffuse cold gas reservoir and kpc-size compactness of the star forming region.
  • We used the PdBI to map a sample of 15 SMGs in the COSMOS field at the wavelength of 1.3 mm. The target SMGs were originally discovered in the JCMT/AzTEC 1.1 mm continuum survey at S/N=4-4.5. This paper presents, for the first time, interferometric millimetre-wavelength observations of these sources. The angular resolution of our observations, 1.8", allowed us to accurately determine the positions of the target SMGs. Using a detection threshold of S/N>4.5 regardless of multiwavelength counterpart association, and 4<S/N<=4.5 if a multiwavelength counterpart within 1.5" is also present, the total number of detections in our survey is 22. Three of our detected SMGs (AzTEC21, 27, and 28; which corresponds to 20%) are marginally resolved at our angular resolution, and these sources are found to have elongated or clumpy morphologies and/or multiple components. Using optical to NIR photometric redshifts, available spectroscopic redshifts, and redshifts estimated from the radio-to-submm spectral index we infer a median redshift of $\tilde{z}=3.20\pm0.25$ for our sample. To study the overall multiplicity and redshift distribution of flux-limited samples of SMGs we combined these sources with the 15 brightest AzTEC SMGs detected at 1.1 mm, AzTEC1-15, and studied previously. This constitutes a complete, flux- and S/N-limited 1.1-mm selected sample. We find that the median redshift for the 15 brightest AzTEC SMGs ($\tilde{z}=3.05\pm0.44$) is consistent with that for AzTEC16-30. This conforms to recent observational findings that SMGs do not exhibit any significant trend between the redshift and (sub)mm flux density. For the combined AzTEC1-30 sample we derive a median redshift of $\tilde{z}=3.17\pm0.27$, consistent with previous results based on mm-selected samples. We further infer that within the combined AzTEC1-30 sample $\sim25\pm9\%$ of sources separate into multiple components.
  • Radio relics are Mpc-scale diffuse synchrotron sources found in galaxy cluster outskirts. They are believed to be associated with large-scale shocks propagating through the intra-cluster medium, although the connection between radio relics and the cluster merger shocks is not yet proven conclusively. We present a first tentative detection of a pressure jump in the well-known relic of the Coma cluster through Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect imaging.The SZE data are extracted from the first public all-sky data release of Planck and we use high-frequency radio data at 2.3 GHz to constrain the shock-front geometry. The SZE data provide evidence for a pressure discontinuity, consistent with the relic position, without requiring any additional prior on the shock-front location. The derived Mach number M = 2.9 (+0.8/-0.6) is consistent with X-ray and radio results. A high-pressure "filament" without any pressure discontinuity is disfavoured by X-ray measurements and a "sub-cluster" model based on the infalling group NGC 4839 can be ruled out considering the published mass estimates for this group. These results signify a first attempt towards directly measuring the pressure discontinuity for a radio relic and the first SZ-detected shock feature observed near the virial radius of a galaxy cluster.
  • We aim to measure the average dust and molecular gas content of massive star-forming galaxies ($\rm > 3 \times 10^{10}\,M_\odot$) up to z=4 in the COSMOS field to determine if the intense star formation observed at high redshift is induced by major mergers or caused by large gas reservoirs. Firstly, we measured the evolution of the average spectral energy distributions as a function of redshift using a stacking analysis of Spitzer, Herschel, LABOCA, and AzTEC data for two samples of galaxies: normal star-forming objects and strong starbursts, as defined by their distance to the main sequence. We found that the mean intensity of the radiation field $< U >$ heating the dust (strongly correlated with dust temperature) increases with increasing redshift up to z$\sim$4 in main-sequence galaxies. We can reproduce this evolution with simple models that account for the decrease of the gas metallicity with redshift. No evolution of $< U >$ with redshift is found in strong starbursts. We then deduced the evolution of the molecular gas fraction (defined here as $\rm M_{\rm mol}/(M_{\rm mol}+M_\star)$) with redshift and found a similar, steeply increasing trend for both samples. At z$\sim$4, this fraction reaches $\sim$60%. The average position of the main-sequence galaxies is on the locus of the local, normal star-forming disks in the integrated Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram (star formation rate versus mass of molecular gas), suggesting that the bulk of the star formation up to z=4 is dominated by secular processes.
  • We present stringent constraints on the average mid-, far-infrared and radio emissions of $\sim$14200 quiescent galaxies (QGs), identified out to $z=3$ in the COSMOS field via their rest-frame NUV$-$r and r$-$J colors, and with stellar masses $M_{\star}=10^{9.8-12.2} \,M_{\odot} $. Stacking in deep Spitzer (MIPS $24\,\mu$m), Herschel (PACS and SPIRE), and VLA (1.4 GHz) maps reveals extremely low dust-obscured star formation rates for QGs (SFR $<0.1-3\,M_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ at $z \leqslant 2$ and $<6-18\,M_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ at $z > 2$), consistent with the low unobscured SFRs ($<0.01-1.2\,M_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$) inferred from modeling their ultraviolet-to-near-infrared photometry. The average SFRs of QGs are $>10\times$ below those of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the $M_{\star}$- and $z$-ranges considered. The stacked 1.4 GHz signals (S/N $> 5$) are, if attributed solely to star formation, in excess of the total (obscured plus unobscured) SFR limits, suggestive of a widespread presence of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) among QGs. Our results reaffirm the existence of a significant population QGs out to $z = 3$, thus corroborating the need for powerful quenching mechanism(s) to terminate star formation in galaxies at earlier epochs.
  • We present ALMA observations of the [CII] line and far-infrared (FIR) continuum of a normally star-forming galaxy in the reionization epoch, the z=6.96 Ly-alpha emitter (LAE) IOK-1. Probing to sensitivities of sigma_line = 240 micro-Jy/beam (40 km/s channel) and sigma_cont = 21 micro-Jy/beam, we found the galaxy undetected in both [CII] and continuum. Comparison of UV - FIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of IOK-1, including our ALMA limit, with those of several types of local galaxies (including the effects of the cosmic microwave background, CMB, on the FIR continuum) suggests that IOK-1 is similar to local dwarf/irregular galaxies in SED shape rather than highly dusty/obscured galaxies. Moreover, our 3 sigma FIR continuum limit, corrected for CMB effects, implies intrinsic dust mass M_dust < 6.4 x 10^7 M_sun, FIR luminosity L_FIR < 3.7 x 10^{10} L_sun (42.5 - 122.5 micron), total IR luminosity L_IR < 5.7 x 10^{10} L_sun (8 - 1000 micron) and dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) < 10 M_sun/yr, if we assume that IOK-1 has a dust temperature and emissivity index typical of local dwarf galaxies. This SFR is 2.4 times lower than one estimated from the UV continuum, suggesting that < 29% of the star formation is obscured by dust. Meanwhile, our 3 sigma [CII] flux limit translates into [CII] luminosity, L_[CII] < 3.4 x 10^7 L_sun. Locations of IOK-1 and previously observed LAEs on the L_[CII] vs. SFR and L_[CII]/L_FIR vs. L_FIR diagrams imply that LAEs in the reionization epoch have significantly lower gas and dust enrichment than AGN-powered systems and starbursts at similar/lower redshifts, as well as local star-forming galaxies.
  • We present IRAM PdBI observations of the CO(3-2) and CO(5-4) line transitions from a Ly-alpha blob at z~2.7 in order to investigate the gas kinematics, determine the location of the dominant energy source, and study the physical conditions of the molecular gas. CO line and dust continuum emission are detected at the location of a strong MIPS source that is offset by ~1.5" from the Ly-alpha peak. Neither of these emission components is resolved with the 1.7" beam, showing that the gas and dust are confined to within ~7kpc from this galaxy. No millimeter source is found at the location of the Ly-alpha peak, ruling out a central compact source of star formation as the power source for the Ly-alpha emission. Combined with a spatially-resolved spectrum of Ly-alpha and HeII, we constrain the kinematics of the extended gas using the CO emission as a tracer of the systemic redshift. Near the MIPS source, the Ly-alpha profile is symmetric and its line center agrees with that of CO line, implying that there are no significant bulk flows and that the photo-ionization from the MIPS source might be the dominant source of the Ly-alpha emission. In the region near the Ly-alpha peak, the gas is slowly receding (~100km/s) with respect to the MIPS source, thus making the hyper-/superwind hypothesis unlikely. We find a sub-thermal line ratio between two CO transitions, I_CO(5-4)/I_CO(3-2)=0.97+/-0.21. This line ratio is lower than the average values found in high-z SMGs and QSOs, but consistent with the value found in the Galactic center, suggesting that there is a large reservoir of low-density molecular gas that is spread over the MIPS source and its vicinity.
  • We present the search for the [CII] emission line in three $z>6.5$ Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) and one J-Dropout galaxy using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). We observed three bright $z\sim6.5-7$ LAEs discovered in the SUBARU deep field (SDF) and the Multiple Imaged lensed $z\sim 11$ galaxy candidate found behind the galaxy cluster MACSJ0647.7+7015. For the LAEs IOK-1 ($z=6.965$), SDF J132415.7+273058 ($z=6.541$) and SDF J132408.3+271543 ($z=6.554$) we find upper limits for the [CII] line luminosity of $<2.05$, $<4.52$ and $<10.56\times10^{8}{\rm L}_{\odot}$ respectively. We find upper limits to the FIR luminosity of the galaxies using a spectral energy distribution template of the local galaxy NGC 6946 and taking into account the effects of the Cosmic Microwave Background on the mm observations. For IOK-1, SDF J132415.7+273058 and SDF J132408.3+271543 we find upper limits for the FIR luminosity of $<2.33$, $3.79$ and $7.72\times10^{11}{\rm L}_{\odot}$ respectively. For the lensed galaxy MACS0647-JD, one of the highest redshift galaxy candidate to date with $z_{\rm ph}=10.7^{+0.6}_{-0.4}$ we put an upper limit in the [CII] emission of $<1.36\times10^{8}\times(\mu/15)^{-1}{\rm L}_{\odot}$ and an upper limit in the FIR luminosity of $<6.1\times10^{10}\times(\mu/15)^{-1}{\rm L}_{\odot}$ (where $\mu$ is the magnification factor). We explore the different conditions relevant for the search for [CII] emission in high redshift galaxies as well as the difficulties for future observations with ALMA and CCAT.
  • We present ALMA observations of the [C II] 158 micron fine structure line and dust continuum emission from the host galaxies of five redshift 6 quasars. We also report complementary observations of 250 GHz dust continuum and CO (6-5) line emission from the z=6.00 quasar SDSS J231038.88+185519.7. The ALMA observations were carried out in the extended array at 0.7" resolution. We have detected the line and dust continuum in all five objects. The derived [C II] line luminosities are 1.6x10^{9} to 8.8x10^{9} Lsun and the [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratios are 3.0-5.6x10^{-4}, which is comparable to the values found in other high-redshift quasar-starburst systems and local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. The sources are marginally resolved and the intrinsic source sizes (major axis FWHM) are constrained to be 0.3" to 0.6" (i.e., 1.7 to 3.5 kpc) for the [C II] line emission and 0.2" to 0.4" (i.e., 1.2 to 2.3 kpc) for the continuum. These measurements indicate that there is vigorous star formation over the central few kpc in the quasar host galaxies. The ALMA observations also constrain the dynamical properties of the atomic gas in the starburst nuclei. The intensity-weighted velocity maps of three sources show clear velocity gradients. Such velocity gradients are consistent with a rotating, gravitationally bound gas component, although they are not uniquely interpreted as such. Under the simplifying assumption of rotation, the implied dynamical masses within the [C II]-emitting regions are of order 10^{10} to 10^{11} Msun. Given these estimates, the mass ratios between the SMBHs and the spheroidal bulge are an order of magnitude higher than the mean value found in local spheroidal galaxies, which is in agreement with results from previous CO observations of high redshift quasars.
  • We have been carrying out a systematic survey of the star formation and ISM properties in the host galaxies of z~6 quasars. Our 250 GHz observations, together with available data from the literature, yield a sample of 14 z~6 quasars that are bright in millimeter dust continuum emission with estimated FIR luminosities of a few 10^12 to 10^13 Lsun. Most of these millimeter-detected z~6 quasars have also been detected in molecular CO line emission, indicating molecular gas masses on order of 10^10 Msun. We have searched for [C II] 158 micron fine structure line emission toward four of the millimeter bright z~6 quasars with ALMA and all of them have been detected. All these results suggest massive star formation at rates of about 600 to 2000 Msun/yr over the central few kpc region of these quasar host galaxies.