• Tasks such as social network analysis, human behavior recognition, or modeling biochemical reactions, can be solved elegantly by using the probabilistic inference framework. However, standard probabilistic inference algorithms work at a propositional level, and thus cannot capture the symmetries and redundancies that are present in these tasks. Algorithms that exploit those symmetries have been devised in different research fields, for example by the lifted inference-, multiple object tracking-, and modeling and simulation-communities. The common idea, that we call state space abstraction, is to perform inference over compact representations of sets of symmetric states. Although they are concerned with a similar topic, the relationship between these approaches has not been investigated systematically. This survey provides the following contributions. We perform a systematic literature review to outline the state of the art in probabilistic inference methods exploiting symmetries. From an initial set of more than 4,000 papers, we identify 116 relevant papers. Furthermore, we provide new high-level categories that classify the approaches, based on the problem classes the different approaches can solve. Researchers from different fields that are confronted with a state space explosion problem in a probabilistic system can use this classification to identify possible solutions. Finally, based on this conceptualization, we identify potentials for future research, as some relevant application domains are not addressed by current approaches.
  • Bayesian Filtering for plan and activity recognition is challenging for scenarios that contain many observation equivalent entities (i.e. entities that produce the same observations). This is due to the combinatorial explosion in the number of hypotheses that need to be tracked. However, this class of problems exhibits a certain symmetry that can be exploited for state space representation and inference. We analyze current state of the art methods and find that none of them completely fits the requirements arising in this problem class. We sketch a novel inference algorithm that provides a solution by incorporating concepts from Lifted Inference algorithms, Probabilistic Multiset Rewriting Systems, and Computational State Space Models. Two experiments confirm that this novel algorithm has the potential to perform efficient probabilistic inference on this problem class.
  • Entropic forces in classical many-body systems, e.g. colloidal suspensions, can lead to the formation of new phases. Quantum fluctuations can have similar effects: spin fluctuations drive the superfluidity of Helium-3 and a similar mechanism operating in metals can give rise to superconductivity. It is conventional to discuss the latter in terms of the forces induced by the quantum fluctuations. However, focusing directly upon the free energy provides a useful alternative perspective in the classical case and can also be applied to study quantum fluctuations. Villain first developed this approach for insulating magnets and coined the term order-by-disorder to describe the observed effect. We discuss the application of this idea to metallic systems, recent progress made in doing so, and the broader prospects for the future.
  • We study the square-lattice Bose-Hubbard model with bounded random on-site energies at zero temperature. Starting from a dual representation obtained from a strong-coupling expansion around the atomic limit, we employ a real-space block decimation scheme. This approach is non-perturbative in the disorder and enables us to study the renormalization-group flow of the induced random-mass distribution. In both insulating phases, the Mott insulator and the Bose glass, the average mass diverges, signaling short range superfluid correlations. The relative variance of the mass distribution distinguishes the two phases, renormalizing to zero in the Mott insulator and diverging in the Bose glass. Negative mass values in the tail of the distribution indicate the presence of rare superfluid regions in the Bose glass. The breakdown of self-averaging is evidenced by the divergent relative variance and increasingly non-Gaussian distributions. We determine an explicit phase boundary between the Mott insulator and Bose glass.
  • We study the interplay of disorder with pumping and decay in coupled qubit-cavity arrays, the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model. We find that relatively weak disorder can wash out the bistability present in the clean pumped system, and that moreover, the combination of disorder in on-site energies and decay can lead to effective phase disorder. To explore these questions, we present a non- equilibrium generalisation of Stochastic-Mean-Field theory, providing a simple tool to address such questions. This technique is developed for rather general forms of light-matter coupling, driving, dissipation, and on-site disorder, making it applicable to a wide range of systems.
  • The formation of new phases close to itinerant electron quantum critical points has been observed experimentally in many compounds. We present a unified analytical model that explains the emergence of new types of order around itinerant ferromagnetic quantum critical points. The central idea of our analysis is that certain Fermi-surface deformations associated with the onset of the competing order enhance the phase-space available for low-energy quantum fluctuations and so self-consistently lower the free energy. We demonstrate that this quantum order-by-disorder mechanism leads to instabilities towards the formation of spiral and d-wave spin nematic phases close to itinerant ferromagnetic quantum critical points in three spatial dimensions.
  • The vicinity of quantum phase transitions has proven fertile ground in the search for new quantum phases. We propose a physically motivated and unifying description of phase reconstruction near metallic quantum-critical points using the idea of quantum order-by-disorder. Certain deformations of the Fermi surface associated with the onset of competing order enhance the phase space available for low-energy, particle-hole fluctuations and self-consistently lower the free energy. Applying the notion of quantum order-by-disorder to the itinerant helimagnet MnSi, we show that near to the quantum critical point, fluctuations lead to an increase of the spiral ordering wave vector and a reorientation away from the lattice favored directions. The magnetic ordering pattern in this fluctuation-driven phase is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutron scattering data in the partially ordered phase of MnSi.
  • We investigate the instabilities of the Mott-insulating phase of the weakly disordered Bose-Hubbard model within a renormalization group analysis of the replica field theory obtained by a strong-coupling expansion around the atomic limit. We identify a new order parameter and associated correlation length scale that is capable of capturing the transition from a state with zero compressibility, the Mott insulator, to one in which the compressibility is finite, the Bose glass. The order parameter is the relative variance of the disorder-induced mass distribution. In the Mott insulator, the relative variance renormalizes to zero, whereas it diverges in the Bose glass. The divergence of the relative variance signals the breakdown of self-averaging. The length scale governing the breakdown of self-averaging is the distance between rare regions. This length scale is finite in the Bose glass but diverges at the transition to the Mott insulator with an exponent of $\nu=1/D$ for incommensurate fillings. Likewise, the compressibility vanishes with an exponent of $\gamma=4/D-1$ at the transition. At commensurate fillings, the transition is controlled by a different fixed point at which both the disorder and interaction vertices are relevant.
  • The magnetic excitations of the iron pnictides are explained within a degenerate double-exchange model. The local-moment spins are coupled by superexchanges $J_1$ and $J_2$ between nearest and next-nearest neighbors, respectively, and interact with the itinerant electrons of the degenerate $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals via a ferromagnetic Hund exchange. The latter stabilizes $(\pi,0)$ stripe antiferromagnetism due to emergent ferro-orbital order and the resulting kinetic energy gain by hopping preferably along the ferromagnetic spin direction. Taking the quantum nature of the spins into account, we calculate the magnetic excitation spectra in the presence of both, super- and double-exchange. A dramatic increase of the spin-wave energies at the competing N\'eel ordering wave vector is found, in agreement with recent neutron scattering data. The spectra are fitted to a spin-only model with a strong spatial anisotropy and additional longer ranged couplings along the ferromagnetic chains. Over a realistic parameter range, the effective couplings along the chains are negative corresponding to unfrustrated stripe antiferromagnetism.
  • We study the weakly disordered Bose-Hubbard model on a cubic lattice through a one-loop renormalization group analysis of the corresponding effective field theory which is explicitly derived by combining a strong-coupling expansion with a replica average over the disorder. The method is applied not only to generic uncorrelated on-site disorder but also to simultaneous hopping disorder correlated with the differences of adjacent disorder potentials. Such correlations are inherent in fine-grained optical speckle potentials used as a source of disorder in optical lattice experiments. As a result of strong coupling, the strength of the replica mixing disorder vertex, responsible for the emergence of a Bose glass, crucially depends on the chemical potential and the Hubbard repulsion and vanishes to leading order in the disorder at commensurate boson fillings. As a consequence, at such fillings a direct transition between the Mott-insulator and the superfluid in the presence of disorder cannot be excluded on the basis of a one-loop calculation. At incommensurate fillings, at a certain length scale, the Mott insulator will eventually become unstable towards the formation of a Boss glass. Phase diagrams as a function of the microscopic parameters are presented and the finite-size crossover between the Mott-insulating state and the Bose glass is analyzed.
  • The complete lack of theoretical understanding of the quantum critical states found in the heavy fermion metals and the normal states of the high-T$_c$ superconductors is routed in deep fundamental problem of condensed matter physics: the infamous minus signs associated with Fermi-Dirac statistics render the path integral non-probabilistic and do not allow to establish a connection with critical phenomena in classical systems. Using Ceperley's constrained path-integral formalism we demonstrate that the workings of scale invariance and Fermi-Dirac statistics can be reconciled. The latter is self-consistently translated into a geometrical constraint structure. We prove that this "nodal hypersurface" encodes the scales of the Fermi liquid and turns fractal when the system becomes quantum critical. To illustrate this we calculate nodal surfaces and electron momentum distributions of Feynman backflow wave functions and indeed find that with increasing backflow strength the quasiparticle mass gradually increases, to diverge when the nodal structure becomes fractal. Such a collapse of a Fermi liquid at a critical point has been observed in the heavy-fermion intermetallics in a spectacular fashion.
  • Recently it was argued that quantum phase transitions can be radically different from classical phase transitions with as a highlight the 'deconfined critical points' exhibiting fractionalization of quantum numbers due to Berry phase effects. Such transitions are supposed to occur in frustrated ('$J_1$-$J_2$') quantum magnets. We have developed a novel renormalization approach for such systems which is fully respecting the underlying lattice structure. According to our findings, another profound phenomenon is around the corner: a fluctuation induced (order-out-of-disorder) first order transition. This has to occur for large spin and we conjecture that it is responsible for the weakly first order behavior recently observed in numerical simulations for frustrated $S=1/2$ systems.
  • We perform an analysis of the K* polarization states in the exclusive B meson decay B0->K*0(-> K- pi+)l+ l- (l=e, mu, tau) in the low dilepton mass region, where the final vector meson has a large energy. Working in the transversity basis, we study various observables that involve the K* spin amplitudes Aperp, Apar, A0 by exploiting the heavy-to-light form factor relations in the heavy quark and large-E_K* limit. We find that at leading order in 1/m_b and alpha_s the form-factor dependence of the asymmetries that involve transversely polarized K* completely drops out. At next-to-leading logarithmic order, including factorizable and non-factorizable corrections, the theoretical errors for the transverse asymmetries turn out to be small in the standard model (SM). Integrating over the lower part of the dimuon mass region, and varying the theoretical input parameters, the SM predicts A_T^(1)=0.9986+/- 0.0002 and A_T^(2)=-0.043+/- 0.003. In addition, the longitudinal and transverse polarization fractions are found to be (69+/-3)% and (31+/-3)% respectively, so that Gamma_L/Gamma_T = 2.23+/-0.31. Beyond the SM, we focus on new physics that mainly gives sizable contributions to the coefficients C_7^eff' of the electromagnetic dipole operators. Taking into account experimental data on rare B decays, we find large effects of new physics in the transverse asymmetries. Furthermore, we show that a measurement of longitudinal and transverse polarization fractions will provide complementary information on physics beyond the SM.
  • We develop a novel renormalization approach for frustrated quantum antiferromagnets. It is designed to consistently treat spin-wave interactions all over the magnetic Brillouin zone, including high-energy modes in outer regions as well as low energy modes in the center. Focusing on the paradigmatic $J_1$-$J_2$ model, we find a unifying description of the second-order transition between the N\'eel phase and the paramagnetic phase and the first-order transition between the N\'eel phase and the columnar phase. Our approach provides explicit results for the renormalized values of the spin stiffness and spin-wave velocity characterizing the low-energy magnons in the N\'eel phase.
  • The spin dynamics of bilayer cuprate compounds are studied in a basic model. The magnetic spectral properties are calculated in linear spin-wave theory for several stripe configurations which differ by the relative location of the stripes in the layers. We focus on the bilayer splitting of the magnon bands near the incommensurate low energy peaks as well as near the $\pi$ resonance, distinguishing between the odd and even channel. We find that a x-shaped dispersion near the $\pi$ resonance is generic for stripes. By comparison of our results to neutron scattering data for $\mathrm{YBa_2Cu_3O_{6+x}}$ we conclude that the stripe model is consistent with characteristic features of bilayer high-$T_c$ compounds.
  • We analyse the form factors for the B --> gamma l^+l^- weak transition. We show that making use of the gauge invariance of the B --> gamma l^+l^- amplitude, the structure of the form factors in the resonance region, and their relations at large values of the photon energy results in efficient constraints on the behavior of the form factors. Based on these constraints, we propose a simple parametrization of the form factors and apply it to the lepton forward-backward (FB) asymmetry in the B --> gamma l^+l^- decay. We find that the behavior of the FB asymmetry as a function of the photon energy, as well as the location of its zero, depend only weakly on the B --> gamma l^+l^- form factors, and thus constitutes a powerful tool for testing the standard model.
  • The spin dynamics of stripes in high-temperature superconductors and related compounds is studied in the framework of a spin-wave theory for a simple spin-only model. The magnon dispersion relation and the magnetic structure factor are calculated for diagonal and vertical stripes. Acoustical as well as optical bands are included in the analysis. The incommensurability and the $\pi$ resonance appear as complementary features of the band structure at different energy scales. The dependence of spin-wave velocities and resonance frequencies on the stripe spacing and coupling is calculated. At low doping, the resonance frequency is found to scale roughly inversely proportional to the stripe spacing. The favorable comparison of the results with experimental data suggests that the spin-only model provides a suitable and simple basis for calculating and understanding the spin dynamics of stripes.
  • We study the interplay of topological excitations in stripe phases: charge dislocations, charge loops, and spin vortices. In two dimensions these defects interact logarithmically on large distances. Using a renormalization-group analysis in the Coulomb gas representation of these defects, we calculate the phase diagram and the critical properties of the transitions. Depending on the interaction parameters, spin and charge order can disappear at a single transition or in a sequence of two transitions (spin-charge separation). These transitions are non-universal with continuously varying critical exponents. We also determine the nature of the points where three phases coexist.
  • We examine the stability of magnetic order in a classical Heisenberg model with quenched random exchange couplings. This system represents the spin degrees of freedom in high-$T_\textrm{c}$ compounds with immobile dopants. Starting from a replica representation of the nonlinear $\sigma$-model, we perform a renormalization-group analysis. The importance of cumulants of the disorder distribution to arbitrarily high orders necessitates a functional renormalization scheme. From the renormalization flow equations we determine the magnetic correlation length numerically as a function of the impurity concentration and of temperature. From our analysis follows that two-dimensional layers can be magnetically ordered for arbitrarily strong but sufficiently diluted defects. We further consider the dimensional crossover in a stack of weakly coupled layers. The resulting phase diagram is compared with experimental data for La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$.