• Electromagnetic radiation at terahertz (THz) frequencies is a useful tool in probing and controlling matter and light in new and interesting ways, especially at high peak-fields and pulse energies. Generating THz radiation often employs nonlinear optical processes, for which the overlapping of stretched, broadband near-infrared (NIR) pulse copies within nonlinear crystals is common. Here we show that for narrowband THz generation, the higher-order phase present on the NIR pulses offers control of the properties of the THz, for example creating temporally complex THz with multiplexed NIR pulses. We manipulate the phase of two NIR pump pulses independently to remove higher order effects and generate record mJ-level THz in two crystals simultaneously, with an average total energy of 604 microjoule at 361 GHz with 1% bandwidth. This high pulse energy combined with such a narrow bandwidth has broad implications for accelerator applications, resonant driven material studies, and nonlinear THz spectroscopy.
  • We perform a detailed experimental and theoretical study of the transition from multiphoton to optical-field photoemission from n-doped, single-crystal silicon nanotips. Around this transition, we measure an enhanced emission rate as well as intensity-dependent structure in the photoelectron yield from the illuminated nanostructures. Numerically solving the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE), we demonstrate that the excess emission derives from the build-up of standing electronic wavepackets near the surface of the silicon, and the intensity dependent structure in this transition results from the increased ponderomotive potential and channel closing effects. By way of time-dependent perturbation theory (TDPT), we then show that the visibility of intensity dependent structure, the transition rate from multiphoton to optical-field emission, and scaling rate at high intensities are all consistent with a narrow band of ground-state energies near the conduction band dominating the emission process in silicon. These results highlight the importance of considering both coherent electron wavepacket dynamics at the emitter surface as well as the ground-state energy distribution when interpreting strong-field photoemission from solids.
  • A velocity-map-imaging spectrometer is demonstrated to characterize the normalized transverse emittance of photoemitted electron bunches. The two-dimensional (2D) projected velocity distribution images of photoemitted electrons are recorded by the detection system and analyzed to obtain the normalized transverse emittance. With the presented distribution function of the electron photoemission angles a mathematical method is implemented to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) velocity distribution curve. As a first example, multiphoton emission from a planar Au surface is studied via irradiation at a glancing angle by intense 45 fs laser pulses at a central wavelength of 800 nm. The reconstructed energy distribution agrees very well with the Berglund-Spicer theory of photoemission. The normalized transverse emittance of the intrinsic electron bunch is characterized to be 0.52 and 0.05 $\pi \cdot mm \cdot mrad$ in $X$- and $Y$-directions, respectively.
  • The strong ellipticity dependence of high-harmonic generation in gases enables numerous experimental techniques that are nowadays routinely used, for instance, to create isolated attosecond pulses. Extending such techniques to high-harmonic generation in solids requires a fundamental understanding of the microscopic mechanism of the high-harmonic generation. Here, using extensive first-principles simulations within a time-dependent density-functional framework, we show how intraband and interband mechanisms are strongly and differently affected by the ellipticity of the driving laser field. The complex interplay between intraband and interband effects can be used to tune and improve harmonic emission in solids. In particular, we show that the energy cutoff of the high-harmonic plateau can be increased by as much as 30\% using a finite ellipticity of the driving field, opening a new avenue for better understanding and control of HHG in solids based on ellipticity. Also, we demonstrate the possibility to generate, from a single circularly polarized driving field, circularly polarized harmonics with alternating helicity. Our work shows that ellipticity provides an additional knob to experimentally control high-order harmonic generation in solids.
  • High-energy, carrier-envelope phase (CEP)-stable, sub-cycle, mid-infrared (mid-IR) pulses can provide unique opportunities of exploring phase-sensitive strong-field light-matter interactions in atoms, molecules, and solids. In the mid-IR wavelength, the ponderomotive energy of laser pulses is dramatically increased (versus the visible/near-infrared) and, therefore, the Keldysh parameter is much smaller than unity even at relatively modest laser intensities. This enables to study the sub-cycle electron dynamics in solids via high-harmonic generation (HHG) without damage. One can also control the electron emissions from nano-devices in the sub-cycle time scale. These efforts are opening a great opportunity towards petahertz electronics. Here, we present a high-energy, sub-cycle pulse synthesizer based on a mid-IR optical parametric amplifier (OPA), pumped by CEP-stable, 2.1 um femtosecond pulses, and its application to HHG in solids. The signal and idler combined spectrum spans from 2.5 to 9.0 um, which covers the whole midwave-infrared (MWIR) region. We coherently synthesize the passively CEP-stable few-cycle signal and idler pulses to generate 33 uJ, 0.88-cycle (12.4 fs), multi-GW pulses centered at ~4.2 um, which is further energy scalable. The in-line synthesis of the CEP-stable sub-cycle pulse is realized through the type-I collinear OPA with minimal temporal walk-off. The MWIR sub-cycle pulse is used for driving HHG in thin silicon samples, producing harmonics up to ~19th order with a continuous spectral coverage due to the isolated emission by the sub-cycle driver. Our demonstration offers an energy scalable and technically simple platform of laser sources generating CEP-stable sub-cycle pulses in the whole MWIR region for investigating isolated phase-sensitive strong-field interactions in solids and gases.
  • Free Electron Lasers (FELs) are a solution for providing intense, coherent and bright radiation in the hard X-ray regime. Due to the low wall-plug efficiency of FEL facilities, it is crucial and additionally very useful to develop complete and accurate simulation tools for better optimizing a FEL interaction. The highly sophisticated dynamics involved in a FEL process was the main obstacle hindering the development of general simulation tools for this problem. We present a numerical algorithm based on finite difference time domain/Particle in cell (FDTD/PIC) in a Lorentz boosted coordinate system which is able to fulfil a full-wave simulation of a FEL process. The developed software offers a suitable tool for the analysis of FEL interactions without considering any of the usual approximations. A coordinate transformation to bunch rest frame makes the very different length scales of bunch size, optical wavelengths and the undulator period transform to values with the same order. Consequently, FDTD/PIC simulations in conjunction with efficient parallelization techniques make the full-wave simulation feasible using the available computational resources. Several examples of free electron lasers are analyzed using the developed software, the results are benchmarked based on standard FEL codes and discussed in detail.
  • Linear acceleration in free space is a topic that has been studied for over 20 years, and its ability to eventually produce high-quality, high energy multi-particle bunches has remained a subject of great interest. Arguments can certainly be made that such an ability is very doubtful. Nevertheless, we chose to develop an accurate and truly predictive theoretical formalism to explore this remote possibility in a computational experiment. The formalism includes exact treatment of Maxwell's equations, exact relativistic treatment of the interaction among the multiple individual particles, and exact treatment of the interaction at near and far field. Several surprising results emerged. For example, we find that 30 keV electrons (2.5% energy spread) can be accelerated to 7.7 MeV (2.5% spread) and to 205 MeV (0.25% spread) using 25 mJ and 2.5 J lasers respectively. These findings should hopefully guide and help develop compact, high-quality, ultra-relativistic electron sources, avoiding conventional limits imposed by material breakdown or structural constraints.
  • An accurate analytic model describing high-harmonic generation (HHG) in solids is derived. Extensive first-principles simulations within a time-dependent density-functional framework corroborate the conclusions of the model. Our results reveal that: (i) the emitted HHG spectra are highly anisotropic and laser-polarization dependent even for cubic crystals, (ii) the harmonic emission is enhanced by the inhomogeneity of the electron-nuclei potential, the yield is increased for heavier atoms, and (iii) the cutoff photon energy is driver-wavelength independent. Moreover, we show that it is possible to predict the laser polarization for optimal HHG in bulk crystals solely from the knowledge of their electronic band structure. Our results pave the way to better control and optimize HHG in solids by engineering their band structure.
  • Ultrashort electron beams with narrow energy spread, high charge, and low jitter are essential for resolving phase transitions in metals, semiconductors, and molecular crystals. These semirelativistic beams, produced by phototriggered electron guns, are also injected into accelerators for x-ray light sources. The achievable resolution of these time-resolved electron diffraction or x-ray experiments has been hindered by surface field and timing jitter limitations in conventional RF guns, which thus far are <200 MV/m and >96 fs, respectively. A gun driven by optically-generated single-cycle THz pulses provides a practical solution to enable not only GV/m surface fields but also absolute timing stability, since the pulses are generated by the same laser as the phototrigger. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical THz gun yielding peak electron energies approaching 1 keV, accelerated by 300 MV/m THz fields in a novel micron-scale waveguide structure. We also achieve quasimonoenergetic, sub-keV bunches with 32 fC of charge, which can already be used for time-resolved low-energy electron diffraction. Such ultracompact, easy to implement guns driven by intrinsically synchronized THz pulses that are pumped by an amplified arm of the already present photoinjector laser provide a new tool with potential to transform accelerator based science.
  • We refine the method towards extraction of sub-cycle transients in the 0.1-1 THz frequency (mm-wavelength) range from optical rectification in lithium niobate using tilted pulse fronts. Our scheme exploits previously unexplored spatio-temporal shaping of the pump pulses, resulting in highly efficient and near diffraction-limited sub-THz transients reaching 0.2 GV/m electric field strengths in free-space using only mJ-level optical ps-pulses. We address experimentally and theoretically the means to producing above-GV/m relativistic sub-THz transients with proper beam confinement and under moderate pumping conditions, thereby bringing widespread access to strong-field and nonlinear terahertz applications and devices.
  • Femtosecond electron bunches with keV energies and eV energy spread are needed by condensed matter physicists to resolve state transitions in carbon nanotubes, molecular structures, organic salts, and charge density wave materials. These semirelativistic electron sources are not only of interest for ultrafast electron diffraction, but also for electron energy-loss spectroscopy and as a seed for x-ray FELs. Thus far, the output energy spread (hence pulse duration) of ultrafast electron guns has been limited by the achievable electric field at the surface of the emitter, which is 10 MV/m for DC guns and 200 MV/m for RF guns. A single-cycle THz electron gun provides a unique opportunity to not only achieve GV/m surface electric fields but also with relatively low THz pulse energies, since a single-cycle transform-limited waveform is the most efficient way to achieve intense electric fields. Here, electron bunches of 50 fC from a flat copper photocathode are accelerated from rest to tens of eV by a microjoule THz pulse with peak electric field of 72 MV/m at 1 kHz repetition rate. We show that scaling to the readily-available GV/m THz field regime would translate to monoenergetic electron beams of ~100 keV.
  • The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators is dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency (RF) accelerating structures operate with 30-50 MeV/m gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional RF structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators and suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here, we demonstrate the first linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically-generated terahertz (THz) pulses. THz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron or proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. Increasing the operational frequency of accelerators into the THz band allows for greatly increased accelerating gradients due to reduced complications with respect to breakdown and pulsed heating. Electric fields in the GV/m range have been achieved in the THz frequency band using all optical methods. With recent advances in the generation of THz pulses via optical rectification of slightly sub-picosecond pulses, in particular improvements in conversion efficiency and multi-cycle pulses, increasing accelerating gradients by two orders of magnitude over conventional linear accelerators (LINACs) has become a possibility. These ultra-compact THz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, future linear particle colliders, ultra-fast electron diffraction, x-ray science, and medical therapy with x-rays and electron beams.
  • Compact laser-driven accelerators are versatile and powerful tools of unarguable relevance on societal grounds for the diverse purposes of science, health, security, and technology because they bring enormous practicality to state-of-the-art achievements of conventional radio-frequency accelerators. Current benchmarking laser-based technologies rely on a medium to assist the light-matter interaction, which impose material limitations or strongly inhomogeneous fields. The advent of few cycle ultra-intense radially polarized lasers has materialized an extensively studied novel accelerator that adopts the simplest form of laser acceleration and is unique in requiring no medium to achieve strong longitudinal energy transfer directly from laser to particle. Here we present the first observation of direct longitudinal laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons that undergo highly-directional multi-GeV/m accelerating gradients. This demonstration opens a new frontier for direct laser-driven particle acceleration capable of creating well collimated and relativistic attosecond electron bunches and x-ray pulses.
  • We experimentally investigate the limits to 800 nm-to-terahertz (THz) energy conversion in lithium niobate at room temperature driven by amplified Ti:Sapphire laser pulses with tilted-pulse-front. The influence of the pump central wavelength, pulse duration, and fluence on THz generation is studied. We achieved a high peak efficiency of 0.12% using transform limited 150 fs pulses and observed saturation of the optical to THz conversion efficiency at a fluence of 15 mJ/cm2. We experimentally identify two main limitations for the scaling of optical-to-THz conversion efficiencies: (i) the large spectral broadening of the optical pump spectrum in combination with large angular dispersion of the tilted-pulse-front and (ii) free-carrier absorption of THz radiation due to multi-photon absorption of the 800 nm radiation.
  • We derive an asymptotically accurate formula for the beam waist of ultrashort, tightly-focused fundamental linearly-polarized, radially-polarized, and azimuthally-polarized modes in free space. We compute the exact beam waist via numerical cubature to ascertain the accuracy with which our formula approximates the exact beam waist over a broad range of parameters of practical interest. Based on this, we describe a method of choosing parameters in the model given the beam waist and pulse duration of a laser pulse.
  • We report on a multi-mJ 2.1-$\mu$m OPCPA system operating at a 1-kHz repetition rate, pumped by a picosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG pump laser, and the phase-matched high-flux high-harmonic soft X-ray generation.
  • We numerically investigate the acceleration and bunch compression capabilities of 20 mJ, 0.6 THz-centered coherent terahertz pulses in optimized metallic dielectric-loaded cylindrical waveguides. In particular, we theoretically demonstrate the acceleration of 1.6 pC and 16 pC electron bunches from 1 MeV to 10 MeV over an interaction distance of 20mm, the compression of a 1.6 pC 1 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 2 fs (50 times compression) over an interaction distance of about 18mm, and the compression of a 1.6 pC 10 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 1.61 fs (62 times) over an interaction distance of 42 cm. The obtained results show the promise of coherent THz pulses in realizing compact electron acceleration and bunch compression schemes.
  • We propose a direct electron acceleration scheme that uses a two-color pulsed radially-polarized laser beam. The two-color scheme achieves electron acceleration exceeding 90% of the theoretical energy gain limit, over twice of what is possible with a one-color pulsed beam of equal total energy and pulse duration. The scheme succeeds by exploiting the Gouy phase shift to cause an acceleration-favoring interference of fields only as the electron enters its effectively final accelerating cycle. Optimization conditions and power scaling characteristics are discussed.
  • We study the direct acceleration of a free electron in infinite vacuum along the axis of a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam. We find that net energy transfer from laser pulse to electron is maximized with the tightest focusing. We show that the net energy gain of an electron initially moving at a relativistic velocity may exceed more than half the theoretical limit of energy transfer, which is not possible with an initially stationary electron in the parameter space studied. We determine and analyze the power scaling of maximum energy gain, extending our study to include a relatively unexplored regime of low powers and revealing that substantial acceleration is already possible without the use of petawatt peak-power laser technology.
  • We hypothesize that a charged particle in unbounded vacuum can be substantially accelerated by a force linear in the electric field of a propagating electromagnetic wave only if the accelerating field is capable of bringing the particle to a relativistic energy in its initial rest frame during the interaction. We consequently derive a general formula for the acceleration threshold of such schemes and support our conclusion with the results of numerical simulations over a broad range of parameters for different kinds of pulsed laser beams.
  • We experimentally and numerically study the atomic response and pulse propagation effects of high-order harmonics generated in Xe, Kr, and Ar driven by a 2.1-\mu m infrared femtosecond light source. The light source is an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier, and a modified strong-field approximation and 3-dimensional pulse propagation code are used for the numerical simulations. The extended cutoff in the long-wavelength driven high-harmonic generation has revealed the spectral shaping of high-order harmonics due to the atomic structure (or photo-recombination cross-section) and the macroscopic effects, which are the main factors of determining the conversion efficiency besides the driving wavelength. Using precise numerical simulations to determine the macroscopic electron wavepacket, we are able to extract the photo-recombination cross-sections from experimental high-order harmonic spectra in the presence of macroscopic effects. We have experimentally observed that the macroscopic effects shift the observed Cooper minimum of Kr from 80 eV to 60-70 eV and wash out the Cooper minimum of Ar. Measured high-harmonic conversion efficiencies per harmonic near the cutoff are ~10^{-9} for all three gases.
  • We present a study of direct laser driven electron acceleration and scaling of attosecond bunch compression in unbound vacuum. Simple analytical expressions and detailed three-dimensional numerical calculations including space charge reveal the conditions for compression to attosecond electron sheets. Intermediate emittance minima suitable for brilliant x-ray generation via coherent inverse Compton scattering (ICS) are predicted. We verify the coherent emission properties of the resulting x-ray fields and demonstrate feasability for realistic laser parameters.
  • We theoretically study the carrier-envelope phase dependent inversion generated in a two-level system by excitation with a few-cycle pulse. Based on the invariance of the inversion under time reversal of the exciting field, parameters are introduced to characterize the phase sensitivity of the induced inversion. Linear and nonlinear phase effects are numerically studied for rectangular and sinc-shaped pulses. Furthermore, analytical results are obtained in the limits of weak fields as well as strong dephasing, and by nearly degenerate perturbation theory for sinusoidal excitation. The results show that the phase sensitive inversion in the ideal two-level system is a promising route for constructing carrier-envelope phase detectors.
  • Using the Kantorovitch method in combination with a Gaussian ansatz, we derive the equations of motion for spatial, temporal and spatiotemporal optical propagation in a dispersive Kerr medium with a general transverse and spectral gain profile. By rewriting the variational equations as differential equations for the temporal and spatial Gaussian q parameters, optical ABCD matrices for the Kerr effect, a general transverse gain profile and nonparabolic spectral gain filtering are obtained. Further effects can easily be taken into account by adding the corresponding ABCD matrices. Applications include the temporal pulse dynamics in gain fibers and the beam propagation or spatiotemporal pulse evolution in bulk gain media. As an example, the steady-state spatiotemporal Gaussian pulse dynamics in a Kerr-lens mode-locked laser resonator is studied.
  • We propose and analyze a new approach to generate a broadband astro-comb by spectral broadening of a narrowband astro-comb inside a highly nonlinear optical fiber. Numerical modeling shows that cascaded four-wave-mixing dramatically degrades the input comb's side-mode suppression and causes side-mode amplitude asymmetry. These two detrimental effects can systematically shift the center-of-gravity of astro-comb spectral lines as measured by an astrophysical spectrograph with resolution \approx100,000; and thus lead to wavelength calibration inaccuracy and instability. Our simulations indicate that this performance penalty, as a result of nonlinear spectral broadening, can be compensated by using a filtering cavity configured for double-pass. As an explicit example, we present a design based on an Yb-fiber source comb (with 1 GHz repetition rate) that is filtered by double-passing through a low finesse cavity (finesse = 208), and subsequent spectrally broadened in a 2-cm, SF6-glass photonic crystal fiber. Spanning more than 300 nm with 16 GHz line spacing, the resulting astro-comb is predicted to provide 1 cm/s (~10 kHz) radial velocity calibration accuracy for an astrophysical spectrograph. Such extreme performance will be necessary for the search for and characterization of Earth-like extra-solar planets, and in direct measurements of the change of the rate of cosmological expansion.