• Size bias occurs famously in waiting-time paradoxes, undesirably in sampling schemes, and unexpectedly in connection with Stein's method, tightness, analysis of the lognormal distribution, Skorohod embedding, infinite divisibility, and number theory. In this paper we review the basics and survey some of these unexpected connections.
  • Asymptotics for Dickman's number theoretic function $\rho(u)$, as $u \rightarrow \infty$, were given de Bruijn and Alladi, and later in sharper form by Hildebrand and Tenenbaum. The perspective in these works is that of analytic number theory. However, the function $\rho(\cdot)$ also arises as a constant multiple of a certain probability density connected with a scale invariant Poisson process, and we observe that Dickman asymptotics can be interpreted as a Gaussian local limit theorem for the sum of arrivals in a tilted Poisson process, combined with untilting. In this paper we exploit and extend this reasoning to obtain analogous asymptotic formulas for a class of functions including, in addition to Dickman's function, the densities of random variables having L\'evy measure with support contained in $[0,1]$, subject to mild regularity assumptions.
  • Billingsley's theorem (1972) asserts that the Poisson--Dirichlet process is the limit, as $n \to \infty$, of the process giving the relative log sizes of the largest prime factor, the second largest, and so on, of a random integer chosen uniformly from 1 to $n$. In this paper we give a new proof that directly exploits Dickman's asymptotic formula for the number of such integers with no prime factor larger than $n^{1/u}$, namely $\Psi(n,n^{1/u}) \sim n \rho(u)$, to derive the limiting joint density functions of the finite-dimensional projections of the log prime factor processes. Our main technical tool is a new criterion for the convergence in distribution of non-lattice discrete random variables to continuous random variables.
  • Let $p_1 \ge p_2 \ge \dots$ be the prime factors of a random integer chosen uniformly from $1$ to $n$, and let $$ \frac{\log p_1}{\log n}, \frac{\log p_2}{\log n}, \dots $$ be the sequence of scaled log factors. Billingsley's Theorem (1972), in its modern formulation, asserts that the limiting process, as $n \to \infty$, is the Poisson-Dirichlet process with parameter $\theta =1$. In this paper we give a new proof, inspired by the 1993 proof by Donnelly and Grimmett, and extend the result to factorizations of elements of normed arithmetic semigroups satisfying certain growth conditions, for which the limiting Poisson-Dirichlet process need not have $\theta =1$. We also establish Poisson-Dirichlet limits, with $\theta \ne 1$, for ordinary integers conditional on the number of prime factors deviating from the usual value $\log \log n$. At the core of our argument is a purely probabilistic lemma giving a new criterion for convergence in distribution to a Poisson-Dirichlet process, from which the number-theoretic applications follow as straightforward corollaries. The lemma uses ingredients similar to those employed by Donnelly and Grimmett, but reorganized so as to allow subsequent number theory input to be processed as rapidly as possible. A by-product of this work is a new characterization of Poisson-Dirichlet processes in terms of multi-intensities.
  • We present new, exceptionally efficient proofs of Poisson--Dirichlet limit theorems for the scaled sizes of irreducible components of random elements in the classic combinatorial contexts of arbitrary assemblies, multisets, and selections, when the components generating functions satisfy certain standard hypotheses. The proofs exploit a new criterion for Poisson--Dirichlet limits, originally designed for rapid proofs of Billingsley's theorem on the scaled sizes of log prime factors of random integers (and some new generalizations). Unexpectedly, the technique applies in the present combinatorial setting as well, giving, perhaps, a long sought-after unifying point of view. The proofs depend also on formulas of Arratia and Tavar{\'e} for the mixed moments of counts of components of various sizes, as well as formulas of Flajolet and Soria for the asymptotics of generating function coefficients.
  • According to a 1975 result of T. Kaijser, if some nonvanishing product of hidden Markov model (HMM) stepping matrices is subrectangular, and the underlying chain is aperiodic, the corresponding $\alpha$-chain has a unique invariant limiting measure $\lambda$. Here the $\alpha$-chain $\{\alpha_n\}=\{(\alpha_{ni})\}$ is given by \[\alpha_{ni}=P(X_n=i| Y_n,Y_{n-1},...),\] where $\{(X_n,Y_n)\}$ is a finite state HMM with unobserved Markov chain component $\{X_n\}$ and observed output component $\{Y_n\}$. This defines $\{\alpha_n\}$ as a stochastic process taking values in the probability simplex. It is not hard to see that $\{\alpha_n\}$ is itself a Markov chain. The stepping matrices $M(y)=(M(y)_{ij})$ give the probability that $(X_n,Y_n)=(j,y)$, conditional on $X_{n-1}=i$. A matrix is said to be subrectangular if the locations of its nonzero entries forms a cartesian product of a set of row indices and a set of column indices. Kaijser's result is based on an application of the Furstenberg--Kesten theory to the random matrix products $M(Y_1)M(Y_2)... M(Y_n)$. In this paper we prove a slightly stronger form of Kaijser's theorem with a simpler argument, exploiting the theory of e chains.