• Enormous Ly$\alpha$ Nebulae (ELANe), unique tracers of galaxy density peaks, are predicted to lie at the nodes and intersections of cosmic filamentary structures. Previous successful searches for ELANe have focused on wide-field narrowband surveys, or have targeted known sources such as ultraluminous quasi-stellar-objects (QSOs) or radio galaxies. Utilizing groups of coherently strong Ly$\alpha$ absorptions (CoSLAs), we have developed a new method to identify high-redshift galaxy overdensities and have identified an extremely massive overdensity, BOSS1441, at $z=2-3$ (Cai et al. 2016a). In its density peak, we discover an ELAN that is associated with a relatively faint continuum. To date, this object has the highest diffuse Ly$\alpha$ nebular luminosity of $L_{\rm{nebula}}=5.1\pm0.1\times10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Above the 2$\sigma$ surface brightness limit of SB$_{\rm{Ly\alpha}}= 4.8\times10^{-18}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$, this nebula has an end-to-end spatial extent of 442 kpc. This radio-quiet source also has extended \civ\ $\lambda1549$ and \heii\ $\lambda1640$ emission on $\gtrsim30$ kpc scales. Note that the Ly$\alpha$, \heii\ and \civ\ emission all have double-peaked line profiles. Each velocity component has a full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of $\approx700 - 1000$ km s$^{-1}$. We argue that this Ly$\alpha$ nebula could be powered by shocks due to an AGN-driven outflow or/and photoionization by a strongly obscured source.
  • We present a detailed study of a unusually bright, lensed galaxy at $z=5.424$ discovered within the CFHTLS imaging survey. With an observed flux of $i_{\rm AB}=23.0$, J141446.82+544631.9 is one of the brightest galaxies known at $z>5$. It is characterized by strong Ly$\alpha$ emission, reaching a peak in (observed) flux density of $>10^{-16}~{\rm erg}~{\rm s}^{-1}~{\rm cm}^{-2}~{\rm \AA}^{-1}$. A deep optical spectrum from the LBT places strong constraints on NV and CIV emission, disfavouring an AGN source for the emission. However, a detection of the NIV]~$\lambda$1486 emission line indicates a hard ionizing continuum, possibly from hot, massive stars. Resolved imaging from HST deblends the galaxy from a foreground interloper; these observations include narrowband imaging of the Ly$\alpha$ emission, which is marginally resolved on $\sim$few~kpc scales and has EW$_0~\sim$ 260\AA. The Ly$\alpha$ emission extends over ~2000~${\rm km}~{\rm s}^{-1}$ and is broadly consistent with expanding shell models. SED fitting that includes Spitzer/IRAC photometry suggests a complex star formation history that include both a recent burst and an evolved population. J1414+5446 lies 30" from the centre of a known lensing cluster in the CFHTLS; combined with the foreground contribution this leads to a highly uncertain estimate for the lensing magnification in the range $5 \leq \mu \leq 25$. Because of its unusual brightness J1414+5446 affords unique opportunities for detailed study of an individual galaxy near the epoch of reionization and a preview of what can be expected from upcoming wide-area surveys that will yield hundreds of similar objects.
  • We report the discovery of the ultra-luminous QSO SMSS~J215728.21-360215.1 with magnitude $z=16.9$ and W4$=7.42$ at redshift 4.75. Given absolute magnitudes of $M_{145,\rm AB}=-29.3$, $M_{300,\rm AB}=-30.12$ and $\log L_{\rm bol}/L_{\rm bol,\odot} = 14.84$, it is the QSO with the highest unlensed UV-optical luminosity currently known in the Universe. It was found by combining proper-motion data from Gaia DR2 with photometry from SkyMapper DR1 and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). In the Gaia database it is an isolated single source and thus unlikely to be strongly gravitationally lensed. It is also unlikely to be a beamed source as it is not discovered in the radio domain by either NVSS or SUMSS. It is classed as a weak-emission-line QSO and possesses broad absorption line features. A lightcurve from ATLAS spanning the time from October 2015 to December 2017 shows little sign of variability.
  • We present a search for bright $z\sim5$ quasars using imaging data from SkyMapper Southern Survey, Pan-STARRS1 and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We select two sets of candidates using WISE with optical bands from SkyMapper and alternatively from Pan-STARRS1, limited to a magnitude of $i<18.2$. We follow up several candidates with spectroscopy and find that the four candidates common to both lists are quasars, while others turned out to be cool stars. Two of the four quasars, SMSS J013539.27-212628.4 at $z=4.86$ and SMSS J093032.58-221207.7 at $z=4.94$, are new discoveries and ranked among the dozen brightest known $z>4.5$ QSOs in the $i$-band.
  • We investigate the evolution of the ionisation parameter of star-forming galaxies using a high-redshift ($z\sim 1.5$) sample from the FMOS-COSMOS survey and matched low-redshift samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By constructing samples of low-redshift galaxies for which the stellar mass ($\mathrm{M}_{*}$), star formation rate (SFR) and specific star formation rate (sSFR) are matched to the high-redshift sample we remove the effects of an evolution in these properties. We also account for the effect of metallicity by jointly constraining the metallicity and ionisation parameter of each sample. We find an evolution in the ionisation parameter for main-sequence, star-forming galaxies and show that this evolution is driven by the evolution of sSFR. By analysing the matched samples as well as a larger sample of $z<0.3$, star-forming galaxies we show that high ionisation parameters are directly linked to high sSFRs and are not simply the byproduct of an evolution in metallicity. Our results are physically consistent with the definition of the ionisation parameter, a measure of the hydrogen ionising photon flux relative to the number density of hydrogen atoms.
  • Taipan is a multi-object spectroscopic galaxy survey starting in 2017 that will cover 2pi steradians over the southern sky, and obtain optical spectra for about two million galaxies out to z<0.4. Taipan will use the newly-refurbished 1.2m UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory with the new TAIPAN instrument, which includes an innovative 'Starbugs' positioning system capable of rapidly and simultaneously deploying up to 150 spectroscopic fibres (and up to 300 with a proposed upgrade) over the 6-deg diameter focal plane, and a purpose-built spectrograph operating from 370 to 870nm with resolving power R>2000. The main scientific goals of Taipan are: (i) to measure the distance scale of the Universe (primarily governed by the local expansion rate, H_0) to 1% precision, and the structure growth rate of structure to 5%; (ii) to make the most extensive map yet constructed of the mass distribution and motions in the local Universe, using peculiar velocities based on improved Fundamental Plane distances, which will enable sensitive tests of gravitational physics; and (iii) to deliver a legacy sample of low-redshift galaxies as a unique laboratory for studying galaxy evolution as a function of mass and environment. The final survey, which will be completed within 5 years, will consist of a complete magnitude-limited sample (i<17) of about 1.2x10^6 galaxies, supplemented by an extension to higher redshifts and fainter magnitudes (i<18.1) of a luminous red galaxy sample of about 0.8x10^6 galaxies. Observations and data processing will be carried out remotely and in a fully-automated way, using a purpose-built automated 'virtual observer' software and an automated data reduction pipeline. The Taipan survey is deliberately designed to maximise its legacy value, by complementing and enhancing current and planned surveys of the southern sky at wavelengths from the optical to the radio.
  • We present a spectroscopic survey of high-redshift, luminous galaxies over four square degrees on the sky, aiming to build a large and homogeneous sample of Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) at $z\approx5.7$ and 6.5, and Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at $5.5<z<6.8$. The fields that we choose to observe are well-studied, such as SXDS and COSMOS. They have deep optical imaging data in a series of broad and narrow bands, allowing efficient selection of galaxy candidates. Spectroscopic observations are being carried out using the multi-object spectrograph M2FS on the Magellan Clay telescope. M2FS is efficient to identify high-redshift galaxies, owing to its 256 optical fibers deployed over a circular field-of-view 30 arcmin in diameter. We have observed $\sim2.5$ square degrees. When the program is completed, we expect to identify more than 400 bright LAEs at $z\approx5.7$ and 6.5, and a substantial number of LBGs at $z\ge6$. This unique sample will be used to study a variety of galaxy properties and to search for large protoclusters. Furthermore, the statistical properties of these galaxies will be used to probe cosmic reionization. We describe the motivation, program design, target selection, and M2FS observations. We also outline our science goals, and present a sample of the brightest LAEs at $z\approx5.7$ and 6.5. This sample contains 32 LAEs with Ly$\alpha$ luminosities higher than 10$^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$. A few of them reach $\ge3\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$, comparable to the two most luminous LAEs known at $z\ge6$, `CR7' and `COLA1'. These LAEs provide ideal targets to study extreme galaxies in the distant universe.
  • Recent observations have suggested that the CIII]$\lambda1907/1909$ emission lines could be alternative diagnostic lines for galaxies in the reionization epoch. We use the F128N narrowband filter on the Hubble Space Telescope's ($\it{HST}$) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) to search for CIII] emission in a sample of five galaxies at z = 5.7 in the Subaru Deep Field and the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field. Using the F128N narrowband imaging, together with the broadband imaging, we do not detect CIII] emission for the five galaxies with $J_{\rm{AB}}$ ranging from 24.10 -- 27.00 in our sample. For the brightest galaxy J132416.13+274411.6 in our sample (z = 5.70, $J_{\rm{AB}} = 24.10$), which has a significantly higher signal to noise, we report a CIII] flux of $3.34\pm1.81 \times 10^{-18}$ $\mathrm{erg\ s^{-1}\ cm^{-2}}$, which places a stringent 3-$\rm\sigma$ upper limit of $5.43\times 10^{-18}$ $\mathrm{erg\ s^{-1}\ cm^{-2}}$ on CIII] flux and 6.57 \AA\ on the CIII] equivalent width. Using the stacked image, we put a 3-$\rm\sigma$ upper limit on the mean CIII] flux of $\mathrm{2.55\times10^{-18}\ erg\ s^{-1}\ cm^{-2}}$, and a 3-$\rm\sigma$ upper limit on the mean CIII] equivalent width of 4.20 {\AA} for this sample of galaxies at z = 5.70. Combined with strong CIII] detection reported among high-z galaxies in the literature, our observations suggest that the equivalent widths of CIII] from galaxies at z $>$ 5.70 exhibit a wide range of distribution. Our strong limits on CIII] emission could be used as a guide for future observations in the reionization epoch.
  • We present a sample of $\sim 1000$ emission line galaxies at $z=0.4-4.7$ from the $\sim0.7$deg$^2$ High-$z$ Emission Line Survey (HiZELS) in the Bo\"otes field identified with a suite of six narrow-band filters at $\approx 0.4-2.1$ $\mu$m. These galaxies have been selected on their Ly$\alpha$ (73), {\sc [Oii]} (285), H$\beta$/{\sc [Oiii]} (387) or H$\alpha$ (362) emission-line, and have been classified with optical to near-infrared colours. A subsample of 98 sources have reliable redshifts from multiple narrow-band (e.g. [O{\sc ii}]-H$\alpha$) detections and/or spectroscopy. In this survey paper, we present the observations, selection and catalogs of emitters. We measure number densities of Ly$\alpha$, [O{\sc ii}], H$\beta$/{\sc [Oiii]} and H$\alpha$ and confirm strong luminosity evolution in star-forming galaxies from $z\sim0.4$ to $\sim 5$, in agreement with previous results. To demonstrate the usefulness of dual-line emitters, we use the sample of dual [O{\sc ii}]-H$\alpha$ emitters to measure the observed [O{\sc ii}]/H$\alpha$ ratio at $z=1.47$. The observed [O{\sc ii}]/H$\alpha$ ratio increases significantly from 0.40$\pm0.01$ at $z=0.1$ to 0.52$\pm0.05$ at $z=1.47$, which we attribute to either decreasing dust attenuation with redshift, or due to a bias in the (typically) fiber-measurements in the local Universe which only measure the central kpc regions. At the bright end, we find that both the H$\alpha$ and Ly$\alpha$ number densities at $z\approx2.2$ deviate significantly from a Schechter form, following a power-law. We show that this is driven entirely by an increasing X-ray/AGN fraction with line-luminosity, which reaches $\approx 100$ \% at line-luminosities $L\gtrsim3\times10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$.
  • We investigate the energy sources of random turbulent motions of ionised gas from H$\alpha$ emission in eight local star-forming galaxies from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. These galaxies satisfy strict pure star-forming selection criteria to avoid contamination from active galactic nuclei (AGN) or strong shocks/outflows. Using the relatively high spatial and spectral resolution of SAMI, we find that -- on sub-kpc scales our galaxies display a flat distribution of ionised gas velocity dispersion as a function of star formation rate (SFR) surface density. A major fraction of our SAMI galaxies shows higher velocity dispersion than predictions by feedback-driven models, especially at the low SFR surface density end. Our results suggest that additional sources beyond star formation feedback contribute to driving random motions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in star-forming galaxies. We speculate that gravity, galactic shear, and/or magnetorotational instability (MRI) may be additional driving sources of turbulence in these galaxies.
  • Stars form in cold molecular clouds. However, molecular gas is difficult to observe because the most abundant molecule (H2) lacks a permanent dipole moment. Rotational transitions of CO are often used as a tracer of H2, but CO is much less abundant and the conversion from CO intensity to H2 mass is often highly uncertain. Here we present a new method for estimating the column density of cold molecular gas (Sigma_gas) using optical spectroscopy. We utilise the spatially resolved H-alpha maps of flux and velocity dispersion from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. We derive maps of Sigma_gas by inverting the multi-freefall star formation relation, which connects the star formation rate surface density (Sigma_SFR) with Sigma_gas and the turbulent Mach number (Mach). Based on the measured range of Sigma_SFR = 0.005-1.5 M_sol/yr/kpc^2 and Mach = 18-130, we predict Sigma_gas = 7-200 M_sol/pc^2 in the star-forming regions of our sample of 260 SAMI galaxies. These values are close to previously measured Sigma_gas obtained directly with unresolved CO observations of similar galaxies at low redshift. We classify each galaxy in our sample as 'Star-forming' (219) or 'Composite/AGN/Shock' (41), and find that in Composite/AGN/Shock galaxies the average Sigma_SFR, Mach, and Sigma_gas are enhanced by factors of 2.0, 1.6, and 1.3, respectively, compared to Star-forming galaxies. We compare our predictions of Sigma_gas with those obtained by inverting the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and find that our new method is a factor of two more accurate in predicting Sigma_gas, with an average deviation of 32% from the actual Sigma_gas.
  • We present the first discoveries from a survey of $z\gtrsim6$ quasars using imaging data from the DECam Legacy Survey (DECaLS) in the optical, the UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) and a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS) in the near-IR, and ALLWISE in the mid-IR. DECaLS will image 9000 deg$^2$ of sky down to $z_{\rm AB}\sim23.0$, and UKIDSS and UHS, which will map the northern sky at $0<DEC<+60^{\circ}$, reaching $J_{\rm VEGA}\sim19.6$ (5-$\sigma$). The combination of these datasets allows us to discover quasars at redshift $z\gtrsim7$ and to conduct a complete census of the faint quasar population at $z\gtrsim6$. In this paper, we report on the selection method of our search, and on the initial discoveries of two new, faint $z\gtrsim6$ quasars and one new $z=6.63$ quasar in our pilot spectroscopic observations. The two new $z\sim6$ quasars are at $z=6.07$ and $z=6.17$ with absolute magnitudes at rest-frame wavelength 1450 \AA\ being $M_{1450}=-25.83$ and $M_{1450}=-25.76$, respectively. These discoveries suggest that we can find quasars close to or fainter than the break magnitude of the Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF) at $z\gtrsim6$. The new $z=6.63$ quasar has an absolute magnitude of $M_{1450}=-25.95$. This demonstrates the potential of using the combined DECaLS and UKIDSS/UHS datasets to find $z\gtrsim7$ quasars. Extrapolating from previous QLF measurements, we predict that these combined datasets will yield $\sim200$ $z\sim6$ quasars to $z_{\rm AB} < 21.5$, $\sim1{,}000$ $z\sim6$ quasars to $z_{\rm AB}<23$, and $\sim 30$ quasars at $z>6.5$ to $J_{\rm VEGA}<19.5$.
  • We present initial results from the first systematic survey of luminous $z\sim 5.5$ quasars. Quasars at $z \sim$ 5.5, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium, quasar evolution and the early super-massive black hole growth. However, it has been very challenging to select quasars at redshifts 5.3 $\le z \le$ 5.7 using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distributions. We develop a new selection technique for $z \sim$ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near-IR and mid-IR photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), UKIRT InfraRed Deep Sky Surveys - Large Area Survey (ULAS), VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) and Wide field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). From our pilot observations in SDSS-ULAS/VHS area, we have discovered 15 new quasars at 5.3 $\le z \le$ 5.7 and 6 new lower redshift quasars, with SDSS z band magnitude brighter than 20.5. Including other two $z \sim$ 5.5 quasars already published in our previous work, we now construct an uniform quasar sample at 5.3 $\le z \le$ 5.7 with 17 quasars in a $\sim$ 4800 square degree survey area. For further application in a larger survey area, we apply our selection pipeline to do a test selection by using the new wide field J band photometric data from a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS). We successfully discover the first UHS selected $z \sim$ 5.5 quasar.
  • We present the HST WFC3/F275W UV imaging observations of A2218-Flanking, a lensed compact dwarf galaxy at redshift $z\approx2.5$. The stellar mass of A2218-Flanking is $\log(M/M_{\odot}=9.14$ and SFR is 12.5$M_\odot$yr$^{-1}$ after correcting the magnification. This galaxy has a young galaxy age of 127 Myr and a compact galaxy size of $r_{1/2}=2.4$kpc. The HST UV imaging observations cover the rest-frame Lyman continuum (LyC) emission ($\sim800${\AA}) from A2218-Flanking. We firmly detect ($14\sigma$) the LyC emission in A2218-Flanking in the F275W image. Together with the HST F606W images, we find that the absolute escape fraction of LyC is $f_{\rm abs,esc}>28-57\%$ based on the flux density ratio between 1700{\AA} and 800{\AA} ($f_{1700}/f_{800}$). The morphology of the LyC emission in the F275W images is extended and well follows the morphology of the UV continuum morphology in the F606W images, suggesting that the $f_{800}$ is not from foreground contaminants. We find that the region with a high star formation rate surface density has a lower $f_{1700}/f_{800}$ (higher $f_{800}/f_{1700}$) ratio than the diffused regions, suggesting that LyC photons are more likely to escape from the region with the intensive star-forming process. We compare the properties of galaxies with and without LyC detections and find that LyC photons are easier to escape in low mass galaxies.
  • We revisit the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation of low- and high-redshift galaxies by using a sample of local analogs of high-redshift galaxies. These analogs share the same location of the UV-selected star-forming galaxies at $z\sim2$ on the [OIII]/H$\beta$ versus [NII]/H$\alpha$ nebular emission-line diagnostic (or BPT) diagram. Their physical properties closely resemble those in $z\sim2$ UV-selected star-forming galaxies being characterized in particular by high ionization parameters ($\log q\approx7.9$) and high electron densities ($n_e\approx100~\rm{cm}^{-3}$). With the full set of well-detected rest-frame optical diagnostic lines, we measure the gas-phase oxygen abundance in the SDSS galaxies and these local analogs using the empirical relations and the photoionization models. We find that the metallicity difference between the SDSS galaxies and our local analogs in the $8.5<log(M_*/M_{\odot})<9.0$ stellar mass bin varies from -0.09 to 0.39 dex, depending on strong-line metallicity measurement methods. Due to this discrepancy the evolution of mass-metallicity should be used to compare with the cosmological simulations with caution. We use the [SII]/H$\alpha$ and [OI]/H$\alpha$ BPT diagram to reduce the potential AGN and shock contamination in our local analogs. We find that the AGN/shock influences are negligible on the metallicity estimation.
  • Star-forming galaxies at $z > 1$ exhibit significantly different properties to local galaxies of equivalent stellar mass. Not only are high-redshift star-forming galaxies characterized by higher star formation rates and gas fractions than their local counterparts, they also appear to host star-forming regions with significantly different physical conditions, including greater electron densities. To understand what physical mechanisms are responsible for the observed evolution of star-forming conditions we have assembled the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at $z\sim 1.5$ with emission-line measurements of the $\mathrm{[OII]} \lambda \lambda 3726,3729$ doublet. By comparing our $z\sim 1.5$ sample to local galaxy samples with equivalent distributions of stellar mass, star formation rate and specific star formation rate we investigate the proposed evolution in electron density and its dependence on global properties. We measure an average electron density of $114_{-27}^{+28} \, \mathrm {cm}^{-3} $ for our $z\sim 1.5$ sample, a factor of five greater than the typical electron density of local star-forming galaxies. However, we find no offset between the typical electron densities of local and high-redshift galaxies with equivalent star-formation rates. Our work indicates that the average electron density of a sample is highly sensitive to the star formation rates, implying that the previously observed evolution is mainly the result of selection effects.
  • Application of fitting techniques to obtain physical parameters---such as ages, metallicities, and $\alpha$-element to iron ratios---of stellar populations is an important approach to understand the nature of both galaxies and globular clusters (GCs). In fact, fitting methods based on different underlying models may yield different results, and with varying precision. In this paper, we have selected 22 confirmed M31 GCs for which we do not have access to previously known spectroscopic metallicities. Most are located at approximately one degree (in projection) from the galactic center. We performed spectroscopic observations with the 6.5 m MMT telescope, equipped with its Red Channel Spectrograph. Lick/IDS absorption-line indices, radial velocities, ages, and metallicities were derived based on the $\rm EZ\_Ages$ stellar population parameter calculator. We also applied full spectral fitting with the ULySS code to constrain the parameters of our sample star clusters. In addition, we performed $\chi^2_{\rm min}$ fitting of the clusters' Lick/IDS indices with different models, including the Bruzual & Charlot models (adopting Chabrier or Salpeter stellar initial mass functions and 1994 or 2000 Padova stellar evolutionary tracks), the GALEV, and the Thomas et al. models. For comparison, we collected their $UVBRIJK$ photometry from the Revised Bologna Catalogue (v.5) to obtain and fit the GCs' spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Finally, we performed fits using a combination of Lick/IDS indices and SEDs. The latter results are more reliable and the associated error bars become significantly smaller than those resulting from either our Lick/IDS indices-only or our SED-only fits.
  • We present the discovery of nine quasars at $z\sim6$ identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of $z\sim6$ quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at $5.7<z\le6.4$, including 29 quasars with $z_{\rm AB}\le20$ mag selected from 11,240 deg$^2$ of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with $20\le z_{\rm AB}\le20.5$ selected from 4223 deg$^2$ of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to $z_{\rm AB}\approx22$ mag from the 277 deg$^2$ in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of $-29.0\le M_{1450}\le-24.5$. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at $z\sim6$. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ($M_{1450}\ge-23$ mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope $\beta$ of the QLF is well constrained to be $\beta=-2.8\pm0.2$. Due to the small number of low-luminosity quasars, the faint-end slope $\alpha$ and the characteristic magnitude $M_{1450}^{\ast}$ are less well constrained, with $\alpha=-1.90_{-0.44}^{+0.58}$ and $M^{\ast}=-25.2_{-3.8}^{+1.2}$ mag. The spatial density of luminous quasars, parametrized as $\rho(M_{1450}<-26,z)=\rho(z=6)\,10^{k(z-6)}$, drops rapidly from $z\sim5$ to 6, with $k=-0.72\pm0.11$. Based on our fitted QLF and assuming an IGM clumping factor of $C=3$, we find that the observed quasar population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the $z\sim6$ IGM at $\sim90$\% confidence. Quasars may still provide a significant fraction of the required photons, although much larger samples of faint quasars are needed for more stringent constraints on the quasar contribution to reionization.
  • Cosmological simulations suggest a strong correlation between high optical-depth Ly$\alpha$ absorbers, which arise from the intergalactic medium (IGM), and 3-D mass overdensities on scales of $10-30$ $h^{-1}$ comoving Mpc. By examining the absorption spectra of $\sim$ 80,000 QSO sight-lines over a volume of 0.1 Gpc$^3$ in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), we have identified an extreme overdensity, BOSS1441, which contains a rare group of strong Ly$\alpha$ absorbers at $z=2.32\pm 0.02$. This absorber group is associated with six QSOs at the same redshift on a 30 comoving Mpc scale. Using Mayall/MOSAIC narrowband and broadband imaging, we detect Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) down to $0.7\times L_{\rm{Ly\alpha}}^*$, and reveal a large-scale structure of Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) in this field. Our follow-up Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) observations have spectroscopically confirmed 19 galaxies in the density peak. We show that BOSS1441 has an LAE overdensity of $10.8\pm 2.6$ on a 15 comoving Mpc scale which could collapse to a massive cluster with $M\gtrsim10^{15}$ M$_\odot$ at $z\sim0$. This overdensity is among the most massive large-scale structures at $z\sim2$ discovered to date.
  • This paper presents the first major data release and survey description for the ANU WiFeS SuperNovA Program (AWSNAP). AWSNAP is an ongoing supernova spectroscopy campaign utilising the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the Australian National University (ANU) 2.3m telescope. The first and primary data release of this program (AWSNAP-DR1) releases 357 spectra of 175 unique objects collected over 82 equivalent full nights of observing from July 2012 to August 2015. These spectra have been made publicly available via the WISeREP supernova spectroscopy repository. We analyse the AWSNAP sample of Type Ia supernova spectra, including measurements of narrow sodium absorption features afforded by the high spectral resolution of the WiFeS instrument. In some cases we were able to use the integral-field nature of the WiFeS instrument to measure the rotation velocity of the SN host galaxy near the SN location in order to obtain precision sodium absorption velocities. We also present an extensive time series of SN 2012dn, including a near-nebular spectrum which both confirms its "super-Chandrasekhar" status and enables measurement of the sub-solar host metallicity at the SN site.
  • This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ~ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ~ 5. Combined our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ~ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range 4.7 <= z < 5.4 and -29 < M1450 <= -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/Va method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as alpha = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope beta = -3.58+/-0.24 and a fainter break magnitude M*1450 = -26.98+/-0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a luminosity evolution and density evolution (LEDE) model. Using the best fit QLF, the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background at z ~ 5 is found to be 18% - 45% with a clumping factor C of 2 - 5. Our sample suggests an evolution of radio loud fraction with optical luminosity but no obvious evolution with redshift.
  • We report exploratory \chandra\ observation of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.30. The quasar is clearly detected by \chandra\ with a possible component of extended emission. The rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity is 9.0$^{+9.1}_{-4.5}$ $\times$ 10$^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$ with inferred photon index of $\Gamma$ = 3.03$^{+0.78}_{-0.70}$. This quasar is X-ray bright, with inferred X-ray-to-optical flux ratio \aox\ $=-1.22^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$, higher than the values found in other quasars of comparable ultraviolet luminosity. The properties inferred from this exploratory observation indicate that this ultraluminous quasar might be growing with super-Eddington accretion and probably viewed with small inclination angle. Deep X-ray observation will help to probe the plausible extended emission and better constraint the spectral features for this ultraluminous quasar.
  • We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [OIII]/H$\beta$ versus [NII]/H$\alpha$ nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in $z\simeq2-3$ galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by $\simeq$0.6~dex and $\simeq$0.9~dex, respectively. The mass-metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows $-0.2$~dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the $z\sim2-3$ galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron densities in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameter and electron density to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.
  • High-redshift quasars are important tracers of structure and evolution in the early universe. However, they are very rare and difficult to find when using color selection because of contamination from late-type dwarfs. High-redshift quasar surveys based on only optical colors suffer from incompleteness and low identification efficiency, especially at $z\gtrsim4.5$. We have developed a new method to select $4.7\lesssim z \lesssim 5.4$ quasars with both high efficiency and completeness by combining optical and mid-IR Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometric data, and are conducting a luminous $z\sim5$ quasar survey in the whole Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We have spectroscopically observed 99 out of 110 candidates with $z$-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5 and 64 (64.6\%) of them are quasars with redshifts of $4.4\lesssim z \lesssim 5.5$ and absolute magnitudes of $-29\lesssim M_{1450} \lesssim -26.4$. In addition, we also observed 14 fainter candidates selected with the same criteria and identified 8 (57.1\%) of them as quasars with $4.7<z<5.4$ . Among 72 newly identified quasars, 12 of them are at $5.2 < z < 5.7$, which leads to an increase of $\sim$36\% of the number of known quasars at this redshift range. More importantly, our identifications doubled the number of quasars with $M_{1450}<-27.5$ at $z>4.5$, which will set strong constraints on the bright end of the quasar luminosity function. We also expand our method to select quasars at $z\gtrsim5.7$. In this paper we report the discovery of four new luminous $z\gtrsim5.7$ quasars based on SDSS-WISE selection.
  • Modern cosmology predicts that a galaxy overdensity is associated to a large reservoir of the intergalactic gas, which can be traced by the Ly$\alpha$ forest absorption. We have undertaken a systematic study of the relation between Coherently Strong intergalactic Ly$\alpha$ Absorption systems (CoSLAs), which have highest optical depth ($\tau$) in $\tau$ distribution, and mass overdensities on the scales of $\sim$ 10 - 20 $h^{-1}$ comoving Mpc. On such large scales, our cosmological simulations show a strong correlation between the effective optical depth ($\tau_{\rm{eff}}$) of the CoSLAs and the 3-D mass overdensities. In moderate signal-to-noise spectra, however, the profiles of CoSLAs can be confused with high column density absorbers. For $z>2.6$, where the corresponding Ly$\beta$ is redshifted to the optical, we have developed the technique to differentiate between these two alternatives. We have applied this technique to SDSS-III quasar survey at $z = 2.6$ - 3.3, and we present a sample of five CoSLA candidates with $\tau_{\rm{eff}}$ on 15 $h^{-1}$ Mpc greater than $4.5\times$ the mean optical depth. At lower redshifts of $z < 2.6$, where the background quasar density is higher, the overdensity can be traced by intergalactic absorption groups using multiple sight lines. Our overdensity searches fully utilize the current and next generation of Ly$\alpha$ forest surveys which cover a survey volume of $> (1\ h^{-1}$ Gpc)$^3$. In addition, systems traced by CoSLAs will build a uniform sample of the most massive overdensities at $z > 2$ to constrain the models of structure formation, and offer a unique laboratory to study the interactions between galaxy overdensities and the intergalactic medium.