• We propose a bio-inspired, agent-based approach to describe the natural phenomenon of group chasing in both two and three dimensions. Using a set of local interaction rules we created a continuous-space and discrete-time model with time delay, external noise and limited acceleration. We implemented a unique collective chasing strategy, optimized its parameters and studied its properties when chasing a much faster, erratic escaper. We show that collective chasing strategies can significantly enhance the chasers' success rate. Our realistic approach handles group chasing within closed, soft boundaries - contrasting most of those published in the literature with periodic ones -- and resembles several properties of pursuits observed in nature, such as the emergent encircling or the escaper's zigzag motion.
  • We investigated different dense multirotor UAV traffic simulation scenarios in open 2D and 3D space, under realistic environments with the presence of sensor noise, communication delay, limited communication range, limited sensor update rate and finite inertia. We implemented two fundamental self-organized algorithms: one with constant direction and one with constant velocity preference to reach a desired target. We performed evolutionary optimization on both algorithms in five basic traffic scenarios and tested the optimized algorithms under different vehicle densities. We provide optimal algorithm and parameter selection criteria and compare the maximal flux and collision risk of each solution and situation. We found that i) different scenarios and densities require different algorithmic approaches, i.e., UAVs have to behave differently in sparse and dense environments or when they have common or different targets; ii) a slower-is-faster effect is implicitly present in our models, i.e., the maximal flux is achieved at densities where the average speed is far from maximal; iii) communication delay is the most severe destabilizing environmental condition that has a fundamental effect on performance and needs to be taken into account when designing algorithms to be used in real life.
  • We present the first decentralized multi-copter flock that performs stable autonomous outdoor flight with up to 10 flying agents. By decentralized and autonomous we mean that all members navigate themselves based on the dynamic information received from other robots in the vicinity. We do not use central data processing or control; instead, all the necessary computations are carried out by miniature on-board computers. The only global information the system exploits is from GPS receivers, while the units use wireless modules to share this positional information with other flock members locally. Collective behavior is based on a decentralized control framework with bio-inspiration from statistical physical modelling of animal swarms. In addition, the model is optimized for stable group flight even in a noisy, windy, delayed and error-prone environment. Using this framework we successfully implemented several fundamental collective flight tasks with up to 10 units: i) we achieved self-propelled flocking in a bounded area with self-organized object avoidance capabilities and ii) performed collective target tracking with stable formation flights (grid, rotating ring, straight line). With realistic numerical simulations we demonstrated that the local broadcast-type communication and the decentralized autonomous control method allows for the scalability of the model for much larger flocks.
  • Animal swarms displaying a variety of typical flocking patterns would not exist without underlying safe, optimal and stable dynamics of the individuals. The emergence of these universal patterns can be efficiently reconstructed with agent-based models. If we want to reproduce these patterns with artificial systems, such as autonomous aerial robots, agent-based models can also be used in the control algorithm of the robots. However, finding the proper algorithms and thus understanding the essential characteristics of the emergent collective behaviour of robots requires the thorough and realistic modeling of the robot and the environment as well. In this paper, first, we present an abstract mathematical model of an autonomous flying robot. The model takes into account several realistic features, such as time delay and locality of the communication, inaccuracy of the on-board sensors and inertial effects. We present two decentralized control algorithms. One is based on a simple self-propelled flocking model of animal collective motion, the other is a collective target tracking algorithm. Both algorithms contain a viscous friction-like term, which aligns the velocities of neighbouring agents parallel to each other. We show that this term can be essential for reducing the inherent instabilities of such a noisy and delayed realistic system. We discuss simulation results about the stability of the control algorithms, and perform real experiments to show the applicability of the algorithms on a group of autonomous quadcopters.
  • We have developed an experimental setup of very simple self-propelled robots to observe collective motion emerging as a result of inelastic collisions only. A circular pool and commercial RC boats were the basis of our first setup, where we demonstrated that jamming, clustering, disordered and ordered motion are all present in such a simple experiment and showed that the noise level has a fundamental role in the generation of collective dynamics. Critical noise ranges and the transition characteristics between the different collective patterns were also examined. In our second experiment we used a real-time tracking system and a few steerable model boats to introduce intelligent leaders into the flock. We demonstrated that even a very small portion of guiding members can determine group direction and enhance ordering through inelastic collisions. We also showed that noise can facilitate and speed up ordering with leaders. Our work was extended with an agent-based simulation model, too, and high similarity between real and simulation results were observed. The simulation results show clear statistical evidence of three states and negative correlation between density and ordered motion due to the onset of jamming. Our experiments confirm the different theoretical studies and simulation results in the literature about collision-based, noise-dependent and leader-driven self-propelled particle systems.