• We present dust polarization and CO molecular line images of NGC 7538 IRS1. We combined data from the SMA, CARMA and JCMT telescopes to make images with 2.5 arcsec resolution at 230 and 345 GHz. The images show a remarkable spiral pattern in both the dust polarization and molecular outflow. These data dramatically illustrate the interplay between a high infall rate onto IRS1 and a powerful outflow disrupting the dense, clumpy medium surrounding the star. The images of the dust polarization and the CO outflow presented here provide observational evidence for the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the infall and the outflow. The spiral dust pattern, which rotates through over 180 degrees from IRS1, may be a clumpy filament wound up by conservation of angular momentum in the infalling material. The redshifted CO emission ridge traces the dust spiral closely through the MM dust cores, several of which may contain protostars. We propose that the CO maps the boundary layer where the outflow is ablating gas from the dense gas in the spiral.
  • The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently concluded a set of engineering flights for Observatory performance evaluation. These in-flight opportunities are viewed as a first comprehensive assessment of the Observatory's performance and are used to guide future development activities, as well as to identify additional Observatory upgrades. Pointing stability was evaluated, including the image motion due to rigid-body and flexible-body telescope modes as well as possible aero-optical image motion. We report on recent improvements in pointing stability by using an active mass damper system installed on the telescope. Measurements and characterization of the shear layer and cavity seeing, as well as image quality evaluation as a function of wavelength have also been performed. Additional tests targeted basic Observatory capabilities and requirements, including pointing accuracy, chopper evaluation and imager sensitivity. This paper reports on the data collected during these flights and presents current SOFIA Observatory performance and characterization.
  • We present {\lambda}1.3 mm CARMA observations of dust polarization toward 30 star-forming cores and 8 star-forming regions from the TADPOL survey. We show maps of all sources, and compare the ~2.5" resolution TADPOL maps with ~20" resolution polarization maps from single-dish submillimeter telescopes. Here we do not attempt to interpret the detailed B-field morphology of each object. Rather, we use average B-field orientations to derive conclusions in a statistical sense from the ensemble of sources, bearing in mind that these average orientations can be quite uncertain. We discuss three main findings: (1) A subset of the sources have consistent magnetic field (B-field) orientations between large (~20") and small (~2.5") scales. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations than the sources with inconsistent large-to-small-scale fields. We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ~1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. (2) Outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields; although, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. (3) Finally, even at ~2.5" resolution we see the so-called "polarization hole" effect, where the fractional polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. All data are publicly available in the electronic edition of this article.
  • We report new results based on the analysis of the SMA and CARMA observations of NGC 7538\,IRS\,1 at 1.3 and 3.4 mm with sub-arcsec resolutions. With angular resolutions $\sim$ 0\farcs7, the SMA and CARMA observations show that the continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.4 mm from the hyper-compact \ion{H}{2} region IRS\,1 is dominated by a compact source with a tail-like extended structure to the southwest of IRS\,1. With a CARMA B-array image at 1.3 mm convolved to 0\farcs1, we resolve the hyper-compact \ion{H}{2} region into two components: an unresolved hyper-compact core, and a north-south extension with linear sizes of $<270$ AU and $\sim$2000 AU, respectively. The fine structure observed with CARMA is in good agreement with the previous VLA results at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the hyper-compact \ion{H}{2} region at the center of IRS\,1 is associated with an ionized bipolar outflow. We image the molecular lines OCS(19-18) and CH$_3$CN(12-11) as well as $^{13}$CO(2-1) surrounding IRS\,1, showing a velocity gradient along the southwest-northeast direction. The spectral line profiles in $^{13}$CO(2-1), CO(2-1), and HCN(1-0) observed toward IRS\,1 show broad redshifted absorption, providing evidence for gas infall with rates in the range of $3-10\times10^{-3}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ inferred from our observations.
  • At the distance of 99-116 pc, HD141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disk, probably in transition between a massive primordial disk and a debris disk. We observed the fine-structure lines of OI at 63 and 145 micron and the CII line at 157 micron with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Telescope as part of the open-time large programme GASPS. We complemented the atomic line observations with archival Spitzer spectroscopic and photometric continuum data, a ground-based VLT-VISIR image at 8.6 micron, and 12CO fundamental ro-vibrational and pure rotational J=3-2 observations. We simultaneously modeled the continuum emission and the line fluxes with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk gas- and dust properties assuming no dust settling. The models suggest that the oxygen lines are emitted from the inner disk around HD141569A, whereas the [CII] line emission is more extended. The CO submillimeter flux is emitted mostly by the outer disk. Simultaneous modeling of the photometric and line data using a realistic disk structure suggests a dust mass derived from grains with a radius smaller than 1 mm of 2.1E-7 MSun and from grains with a radius of up to 1 cm of 4.9E-6 MSun. We constrained the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mass to be between 2E-11 and 1..4E-10 MSun assuming circumcircumcoronene (C150H30) as the representative PAH. The associated PAH abundance relative to hydrogen is lower than those found in the interstellar medium (3E-7) by two to three orders of magnitude. The disk around HD141569A is less massive in gas (2.5 to 4.9E-4 MSun or 67 to 164 MEarth) and has a flat opening angle (<10%). [abridged]
  • We present 30 and 40 micron imaging of the massive protostar G35.20-0.74 with SOFIA-FORCAST. The high surface density of the natal core around the protostar leads to high extinction, even at these relatively long wavelengths, causing the observed flux to be dominated by that emerging from the near-facing outflow cavity. However, emission from the far-facing cavity is still clearly detected. We combine these results with fluxes from the near-infrared to mm to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED). For isotropic emission the bolometric luminosity would be 3.3x10^4 Lsun. We perform radiative transfer modeling of a protostar forming by ordered, symmetric collapse from a massive core bounded by a clump with high mass surface density, Sigma_cl. To fit the SED requires protostellar masses ~20-34 Msun depending on the outflow cavity opening angle (35 - 50 degrees), and Sigma_cl ~ 0.4-1 g cm-2. After accounting for the foreground extinction and the flashlight effect, the true bolometric luminosity is ~ (0.7-2.2)x10^5 Lsun. One of these models also has excellent agreement with the observed intensity profiles along the outflow axis at 10, 18, 31 and 37 microns. Overall our results support a model of massive star formation involving the relatively ordered, symmetric collapse of a massive, dense core and the launching bipolar outflows that clear low density cavities. Thus a unified model may apply for the formation of both low and high mass stars.
  • The BD+40\degree4124 region was observed with high angular and spectral resolution with the German heterodyne instrument GREAT in CO J = 13 \rightarrow 12 and [CII] on SOFIA. These observations show that the [CII] emission is very strong in the reflection nebula surrounding the young Herbig Ae/Be star BD+40\degree4124. A strip map over the nebula shows that the [CII] emission approximately coincides with the optical nebulosity. The strongest [CII] emission is centered on the B2 star and a deep spectrum shows that it has faint wings, which suggests that the ionized gas is expanding. We also see faint CO J = 13 \rightarrow 12 at the position of BD+40\degree4124, which suggests that the star may still be surrounded by an accretion disk.We also detected [CII] emission and strong CO J = 13 \rightarrow 12 toward V1318 Cyg. Here the [CII] emission is fainter than in BD+40\degree4124 and appears to come from the outflow, since it shows red and blue wings with very little emission at the systemic velocity, where the CO emission is quite strong. It therefore appears that in the broad ISO beam the [CII] emission was dominated by the reflection nebula surrounding BD+40\degree4124, while the high J CO lines originated from the adjacent younger and more deeply embedded binary system V1318 Cyg.
  • We present high angular resolution continuum observations of the high-mass protostar NGC 7538S with BIMA and CARMA at 3 and 1.4 mm, VLA observations at 1.3, 2, 3.5 and 6 cm, and archive IRAC observations from the Spitzer Space Observatory, which detect the star at 4.5, 5.8, and 8 $\mu$m. The star looks rather unremarkable in the mid-IR. The excellent positional agreement of the IRAC source with the VLA free-free emission, the OH, CH$_3$OH, H$_2$O masers, and the dust continuum confirms that this is the most luminous object in the NGC 7538S core. The continuum emission at millimeter wavelengths is dominated by dust emission from the dense cold cloud core surrounding the protostar. Including all array configurations, the emission is dominated by an elliptical source with a size of ~ 8" x 3". If we filter out the extended emission we find three compact mm-sources inside the elliptical core. The strongest one, $S_A$, coincides with the VLA/IRAC source and resolves into a double source at 1.4 mm, where we have sub-arcsecond resolution. The measured spectral index, $\alpha$, between 3 and 1.4 mm is ~ 2.3, and steeper at longer wavelengths, suggesting a low dust emissivity or that the dust is optically thick. We argue that the dust in these accretion disks is optically thick and estimate a mass of an accretion disk or infalling envelope surrounding S$_A$ to be ~ 60 solar masses.
  • We present high signal-to-noise, moderate spectral resolution (R ~ 2000-2500) near-infrared (0.8-5.0 micron) spectroscopy of the nearby T Tauri star TW Hya. By comparing the spectrum and the equivalent widths of several atomic and molecular features with those for stars in the IRTF near-infrared library, we revise the spectral type to M2.5V, which is later than usually adopted (K7V). This implies a substantially cooler stellar temperature than previously assumed. Comparison with various pre-main sequence models suggests that TW Hya is only ~3 Myr old; much younger than the usually adopted 8 - 10 Myr. Analysis of the relative strengths of the H lines seen in the spectrum yields estimates for the temperature and density of the emitting region of T_e > 7500 K and n_e ~ 10^{12} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. The thickness of the emitting region is 10^2 - 10^4 km and the covering fraction is f_\ast ~ 0.04. Our derived physical parameter values agree with the predictions of the magnetospheric accretion scenario. The highest signal-to-noise H lines have profiles that indicate multiple emission components. We derive an excess spectrum (above that of the M2.5V template) that peaks in the H band. Although our derived veiling values, ~ 0.1, agree with previous estimates, the excess spectrum does not match that of current models in which this flux is generated by an inner optically thin disk. We suggest that the excess flux spectrum instead reflects the differences in atmospheric opacity, gravity, and age between TW Hya and older, higher gravity field M2.5 dwarfs.
  • We have acquired sub-millimeter observations of 33 fields containing 37 Herbig Ae/Be (HAEBE) stars or potential HAEBE stars, including SCUBA maps of all but two of these stars. Nine target stars show extended dust emission. The other 18 are unresolved, suggesting that the dust envelopes or disks around these stars are less than a few arcseconds in angular size. In several cases we find that the strongest sub-millimeter emission originates from younger, heavily embedded sources rather than from the HAEBE star, which means that previous models must be viewed with caution. These new data, in combination with far-infrared flux measurements available in the literature, yield SEDs from far-infrared to millimeter wavelengths for all the observed objects. Isothermal fits to these SEDs demonstrate excellent fits, in most cases, to the flux densities longward of 100 {\mu}m. We find that a smaller proportion of B-type stars than A and F-type stars are surrounded by circumstellar disks, suggesting that disks around B stars dissipate on shorter time scales than those around later spectral types. Our models also reveal that the mass of the circumstellar material and the value of beta are correlated, with low masses corresponding to low values of beta. Since low values of beta imply large grain sizes, our results suggest that a large fraction of the mass in low-beta sources is locked up in very large grains. Several of the isolated HAEBE stars have disks with very flat sub-millimeter SEDs. These disks may be on the verge of forming planetary systems.
  • We present deep high angular resolution observations of the high-mass protostar NGC 7538S, which is in the center of a cold dense cloud core with a radius of 0.5 pc and a mass of ~2,000 Msun. These observations show that NGC 7538S is embedded in a compact elliptical core with a mass of 85 - 115 Msun. The star is surrounded by a rotating accretion disk, which powers a very young, hot molecular outflow approximately perpendicular to the rotating accretion disk. The accretion rate is very high, ~ 1.4 - 2.8 10^-3 Msun yr^-1. Evidence for rotation of the disk surrounding the star is seen in all largely optically thin molecular tracers, H13CN J = 1-0, HN13C J = 1-0, H13CO+ J = 1-0, and DCN J = 3-2. Many molecules appear to be affected by the hot molecular outflow, including DCN and H13CO+. The emission from CH3CN, which has often been used to trace disk rotation in young high-mass stars, is dominated by the outflow, especially at higher K-levels. Our new high-angular resolution observations show that the rotationally supported part of the disk is smaller than we previously estimated. The enclosed mass of the inner, rotationally supported part of the disk (D ~ 5", i.e 14,000 AU) is ~ 14 - 24 Msun.
  • We present multi-wavelength, high spatial resolution imaging of the IRS 7 region in the R Corona Australis molecular cloud. Our observations include 1.1 mm continuum and HCO^+ J = $3 \to 2$ images from the SMA, ^{12}CO J = $3 \to 2$ outflow maps from the DesertStar heterodyne array receiver on the HHT, 450 $\mu$m and 850 $\mu$m continuum images from SCUBA, and archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 \micron images. The accurate astrometry of the IRAC images allow us to identify IRS 7 with the cm source VLA 10W (IRS 7A) and the X-ray source X_W. The SMA 1.1 mm image reveals two compact continuum sources which are also distinguishable at 450 $\mu$m. SMA 1 coincides with X-ray source CXOU J190156.4-365728 and VLA cm source 10E (IRS 7B) and is seen in the IRAC and MIPS images. SMA 2 has no infrared counterpart but coincides with cm source VLA 9. Spectral energy distributions constructed from SMA, SCUBA and Spitzer data yield bolometric temperatures of 83 K for SMA 1 and $\leq$70 K for SMA 2. These temperatures along with the submillimeter to total luminosity ratios indicate that SMA 2 is a Class 0 protostar, while SMA 1 is a Class 0/Class I transitional object (L=$17\pm6$ \Lsun). The ^{12}CO J = $3 \to 2$ outflow map shows one major and possibly several smaller outflows centered on the IRS 7 region, with masses and energetics consistent with previous work. We identify the Class 0 source SMA 2/VLA 9 as the main driver of this outflow. The complex and clumpy spatial and velocity distribution of the HCO^+ J = $3 \to 2$ emission is not consistent with either bulk rotation, or any known molecular outflow activity.